What is the book of Job in the Bible?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Cameron Lawrence



What is the book of Job in the Bible?

You take a book.

Look.

You read about a group of men sitting around a campfire. One by one they get up and give long speeches, page after page of uninterrupted poetry. And one of them responds with similar long poetic speeches.

The book, which mostly consists of these long poetic speeches, is topped off at the beginning and end with a prose chapter, like matching bookends. In the opening chapter, the protagonist loses almost all his family and all his wealth. In the final chapter, he wins a whole new family and gets his wealth back. Pretty nice symmetry, don't you think?

So what kind of writing?

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You take a book.

Look.

You read about a group of men sitting around a campfire. One by one they get up and give long speeches, page after page of uninterrupted poetry. And one of them responds with similar long poetic speeches.

The book, which mostly consists of these long poetic speeches, is topped off at the beginning and end with a prose chapter, like matching bookends. In the opening chapter, the protagonist loses almost all his family and all his wealth. In the final chapter, he wins a whole new family and gets his wealth back. Pretty nice symmetry, don't you think?

So what kind of writing do we have here? It is a play? A poem? A science fiction story? A newspaper report? A law?

This is where you need to exercise smart judgment. It seems unlikely to be a description of an actual event, in part because people don't normally speak to each other in long, long poems, and even if they do, who was recording it? Tape recorders had not been invented back then. It looks a bit like a Shakespearean play with all that poetry and long speeches. The opening and final chapters seem to frame the poetic part, once again, a plausible literary device. It seems that the aim of the book is to reflect on the central question discussed in the long speeches: why does this righteous suffer? It would come to the conclusion that it was composed by an author, not recorded from actual events.

So the book seems like a work of literary imagination, no more historical than Hamlet or Romeo and Juliet, where the writer makes us linger and think about a very important question. I dont see why not. The gospels have made up stories, like the Good Samaritan, that are very helpful ways to teach. Why shouldn't the book of Job be a story made up to make us think?

And if the play is an imaginary drama to discuss suffering, we should not take the details of the story too seriously: they are there to configure the drama, not to be a scientific or historical record of "facts." We must imagine "Satan" (not necessarily the character we think of as "Satan" today) receiving permission to aggravate Job to no end, and then imagine Job and his "friends" reflecting on the outcome. This "act of Satan" sets the story - the trouble Job is suffering when he has done nothing wrong - which is the real theme of the book.

The Book of Job is not there to answer questions about "Satan" as that term could be understood in the New Testament or even in modern times. Rather, the character "Satan" is in the book to establish the theme of undeserved suffering.

Don't try to read more on "Satan" than that.

Job is not a manual on demonology.

The book of Job reveals some crucial themes without which we could not understand why Jesus was sent to earth to be tested to the point of his agonizing death.

In the book Satan appears before God and when God questions Satan's contempt for Job, who was the most just and faithful man alive at that time, Satan makes the accusation that Job is only faithful for selfish reasons because of everything that God gave him and how he protected him. Satan tells God that if you take all of that away from him, he will curse you to your very face. So Jehovah allowed the Devil to test Job, but commanded him to stop before taking h

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The book of Job reveals some crucial themes without which we could not understand why Jesus was sent to earth to be tested to the point of his agonizing death.

In the book Satan appears before God and when God questions Satan's contempt for Job, who was the most just and faithful man alive at that time, Satan makes the accusation that Job is only faithful for selfish reasons because of everything that God gave him and how he protected him. Satan tells God that if you take all of that away from him, he will curse you to your very face. So Jehovah allowed the Devil to test Job, but ordered him to stop before taking his life. Satan tested Job severely only for Job to prove he was a liar.

The book of Job thus reveals the challenge that Satan made, not only on the faithful Job, but on all the faithful to God. Satan's defiance called into question the integrity of all of God's faithful children, both his faithful angels in heaven (the millions of spirit children that God created long before the creation of man) and faithful human beings on earth. Like Job, Satan claimed that he could break the loyalty of any faithful person to God. (Job 1: 7-11), (Job 2: 3-5)

Jehovah decided to send his beloved son to earth to be born as a man to solve the problem that Satan had raised. Jesus was the most loyal, most faithful, and most faithful angelic son of God, so God allowed Satan to test him to prove that the Devil was a liar. Why Jesus?

Well, imagine you are in a room full of people and a man walks in and challenges everyone with these words: "I can fight and defeat anyone in this room!" How would you prove that challenge is wrong? Would he make everyone in the room fight the man one at a time? No, to solve that challenge you would only need the strongest man in the room to fight him. If the stronger man defeated him, the problem would be solved, he would be shown to be a liar.

Was Jesus the "strongest" and most loyal son of God?

Unlike what he had done to Job, Jehovah allowed Satan to test his only son's loyalty to the point of death. However, to show the confidence he had in his loyal ones, God allowed Satan to test his most loyal son, not as a mighty angel, but instead allowed him to be tested as an ordinary human being with no special power or influence, but as a common human being. humble man of scarce resources, son of a humble carpenter.

Even then Satan waited until Jesus became even weaker. It was when Jesus went into the desert and fasted for forty days that Satan came to Jesus when he was weak from hunger. But despite his state of weakness, Jesus rejected all the temptations of Satan, he remains faithful to his Heavenly Father. So Satan waited for another opportune moment.

Three and a half years later, the devil once again tried to break Jesus by falsely accusing him, unjustly judging him, insulted, beaten, spat on, whipped, and nailed to a torture stake to die. Still, Jesus proved unswervingly loyal to Jehovah until his death.

Jesus willingly endured this agonizing and humiliating death to prove once and for all that Satan the Devil is a monstrous liar. Like Job, Jesus demonstrated that he was faithful to God out of selfless love and genuine loyalty to our benevolent Creator.

The Book of Job is one of the most puzzling books in the Bible. It talks about God sending Satan to hurt Job, to prove how righteous Job really is. Not only does this seem to involve God in doing evil, it also raises questions about the relationship between God and Satan.

The Book of Job begins by telling us that Job, who lived in the land of Uz, was perfect and righteous, fearing God, and avoiding evil. He was a rich man who had seven sons and three daughters. Then we learn about Satan, who came to present himself to God along with God's children. When Satan has nothing to reign

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The Book of Job is one of the most puzzling books in the Bible. It talks about God sending Satan to hurt Job, to prove how righteous Job really is. Not only does this seem to involve God in doing evil, it also raises questions about the relationship between God and Satan.

The Book of Job begins by telling us that Job, who lived in the land of Uz, was perfect and righteous, fearing God, and avoiding evil. He was a rich man who had seven sons and three daughters. Then we learn about Satan, who came to present himself to God along with God's children. When Satan has nothing to report on his recent trip around the world, God asks him if he has thought of testing Job, the fairest of men. Satan says that no man is so righteous that he will not curse God if God does wrong to him. God accepts the challenge and tells Satan to go and do any wrong to Job, except harm Job's person.

The remainder of chapter 1 tells how, through Satan, the Sabeans killed all of Job's servants and took all his cattle and donkeys, and the Chaldeans took their camels, then a storm killed their sons and daughters while they ate in a house. Job mourned his losses, but despite all this, he never cursed God. In his next audience with God, Satan admitted that he had not caused Job to sin. So God gave Satan a new challenge, in the sense that he could even harm Job, but not kill him.

We have a series of conversations between Job and his three friends who had learned of his misfortunes. In verse 4:17, Eliphaz asks Job if it is right for a man to be more righteous than God. You are giving Job permission to curse God. In chapter 8, Bildad the suhita says that God is just, so these calamities must be a just punishment for the sins of Job's children, or Job himself, because otherwise God would have already fixed the problems that had happened. In chapter 11, Zophar the Naamatite continues Bildad's observations and says that if only God spoke to Job, then he would know why God is doing these things to him. The conversation continues, discussing questions of virtue and wisdom, with Job always showing himself just and thankful to God. Finally, Job 32: 1:

The Book ends with young Elihu judging Job harshly, then God takes over the judgment against Job. In return for his losses, the Lord gives Job twice what he had before, with thousands of sheep, donkeys, and camels. In addition, Job has seven other sons and seven other daughters, lives one hundred and forty years, and sees his sons and grandchildren.

KL Noll, in Canaan and Israel in ancient times, describes the Book of Job as a satire that attacks the conventional doctrine of 'blaming the victim' and in which an incompetent patron god is tricked into making a foolish bet with a divine subordinate . He says:

Although the tale and its poetic dialogues are best described as a farce, it has been taken seriously as a work of sophisticated theology, and perhaps that was the ancient author's intention.

Sure. Job was a godly man. He did what God wanted, and for that he was prosperous; he had many property and children, a loving wife, and good health. Satan, an inquisitor-type figure in the divine court in opposition to the ruler of hell, went to G-d and declared that Job was only a godly man because he was successful, and that he would stop loving G-d if all his things were taken away from him. . of the. Gd disagreed and invited Satan to test him by giving him permission to take away Job's prosperity, but not his life.

Satan did. In a short series of calamities, Job lost everything that made him rich.

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Sure. Job was a godly man. He did what God wanted, and for that he was prosperous; he had many property and children, a loving wife, and good health. Satan, an inquisitor-type figure in the divine court in opposition to the ruler of hell, went to G-d and declared that Job was only a godly man because he was successful, and that he would stop loving G-d if all his things were taken away from him. . of the. Gd disagreed and invited Satan to test him by giving him permission to take away Job's prosperity, but not his life.

Satan did. In a short series of calamities, Job lost everything that made him rich, as well as his children, but his health was spared, and he still praised Gd and was a godly man. Satan went to Gd and told him that Job was just a godly man because his health was intact, so Gd gave Satan permission to take away Job's health, but to keep him alive.

Job proceeded to get welts that were painful, and his wife left him. He continues, and initially he is still pious, but when his prayers go unanswered, he begins to hate Gd and insult Him. Three of his friends work to make him see reason, but he rebukes them and aggressively defies Gd. Gd himself comes and talks to Job, convincing him that he is right by doing what he likes and then returning the wealth to him once he capitulates.

It would be the first biblical story I would turn to for questions like 'why do bad things happen to good people?' or 'Is Gd testing me?' His story is accessible to Christians and almost anyone. I have counted this from memory and have missed many details and do not give any actual reference. Sorry. You will see that this is more or less what happens, but of course send me updates in the comments.

Thank you for the question: "What is the book of Job in the Bible?"

As I thought about this question, a verse from Job came to mind. In Job 40: 6–7, the LORD said this to Job:

"6 Then the Lord spoke to Job out of the storm: 7" Prepare as a man; I will ask you and you will answer me. 8 “Would you discredit my justice? Would you condemn me to justify yourself?

Job made this accusation that God has acted unjustly to him. At work. 27: 2, says this: "As God lives, who has denied me justice, the Almighty, who has made me taste the bitterness of my soul." Job wanted his day at court

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Thank you for the question: "What is the book of Job in the Bible?"

As I thought about this question, a verse from Job came to mind. In Job 40: 6–7, the LORD said this to Job:

"6 Then the Lord spoke to Job out of the storm: 7" Prepare as a man; I will ask you and you will answer me. 8 “Would you discredit my justice? Would you condemn me to justify yourself?

Job made this accusation that God has acted unjustly to him. At work. 27: 2, says this: "As God lives, who has denied me justice, the Almighty, who has made me taste the bitterness of my soul." Job wanted his day in court with God to ask him why he had acted this way with him. in light of his righteous life on earth. He listed his righteous actions in Job 29-30.

“I made a pact with my eyes not to look lustfully at a young woman… 5“ If I have walked in falsehood or my foot has hurried after deceit,
6 may God weigh me on honest scales and he will know that I am blameless.
7 If my steps strayed from the path, if my heart was guided by my eyes, or if my hands have been defiled, 8 then others will eat what I sowed, and my crops will be plucked.

13 “If I have denied justice to any of my servants, whether male or female,
when they have a wrong against me, 14 what will I do when God confronts me? What will I answer when I am called to account? 15 Didn't he that made me in the womb make them? Didn't the same form us both within our mothers?

16 “If I have denied the wishes of the poor or let the widow's eyes grow weary, 17 if I have kept my bread for myself, not sharing it with orphans, 18 but from my youth I raised them as a father would and Since I was born I have led the widow, 19 if I have seen someone perish for lack of clothes,
or the needy without clothes, 20 and their heart did not bless me for warming them with the fleece of my sheep, 21 if I have raised my hand against the an orphan, knowing that I had influence at court, 22 then I let my arm fall from my shoulder, break at the joint. 23 Because he feared the destruction of God, and for fear of his splendor he could not do such things.

It is clearly evident that Job lived in the fear of God and expected God to bless him for his righteous life on earth. It is against this backdrop that Satan appears before God and God praises Job highly. Satan accuses God that Job worships God because he has blessed him. Satan challenged God to see if Job would really still revere God if he lost everything. Satan said, "But reach out your hand and strike everything he has, and he will surely curse you to your face" (Job 1:11).

Therefore, there are two questions for every follower of God:

  1. Do we love / revere God for who He is or for what we receive from Him?
  2. Do we accuse God of acting unfairly when things don't go our way or do we trust God even when everything goes wrong in our lives?

The Book of Job is very relevant in our time when one doubts the love and justice of God. For every believer, it is not just about one's comfort in this life. Everything that happens to a follower of God is ultimately reflected in the character and glory of God.

ABSTRACT: It is not about the rights of the believer, but about his righteous life before God who glorifies him.

Job is a man who believes in God but without any hope of a life after death, since in those times, for the Jews, life after death was not a possibility.

Satan is "a stone in the middle of the road" to old Rabbis. We all understand that the cycle of life is broken through pain and obstacles.

God is life. God's will is more of an explanation for the present than past events.

So now the story of Job is supposed to give some clues on how to deal with all those realities.

Work loses everything. He is angry, tired, sad but not depressed. He still has hope and believes in life.

What is the end of the story? Invest in life again

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Job is a man who believes in God but without any hope of a life after death, since in those times, for the Jews, life after death was not a possibility.

Satan is "a stone in the middle of the road" to old Rabbis. We all understand that the cycle of life is broken through pain and obstacles.

God is life. God's will is more of an explanation for the present than past events.

So now the story of Job is supposed to give some clues on how to deal with all those realities.

Work loses everything. He is angry, tired, sad but not depressed. He still has hope and believes in life.

What is the end of the story? Invest in life again and found a new family with children.

For ancient Jews this is the goal, to give life, car for life.
But to achieve that and avoid morbid reactions, Job needs a help: his relationship with God.

PS
Understanding that for ancient people God's will is a post-event explanation and not some kind of prophecy is fundamental to understanding those texts! They are written by humans after those events.

The book of Job reveals to us the character of God and how the devil is working behind the misfortunes that people face today.

We understand that God has full authority over everything, no matter what the devil does, it has to be approved by God.

Man is on the battlefield, as a target to be attacked by the devil. God allows us to be attacked at times to test God's ordained principles. God has to prove his justice and fairness to his creation. We must be tested to prove our faith and obedience to Him. Whoever trusts God and trusts God will be abundantly blessed.

It is the story of a man who is given a hard time by Satan, with God's full permission. Just to add to his problems, he has a group of friends who say to him, "Well, you must have done something to provoke this on you."

The central idea of ​​the story is that suffering cannot necessarily be construed as divinely inflicted punishment of some kind, contrary to what Job's friends seem to think.

Old Testament

Very few of the Old Testament books were written close to the period described. We have to look at the linguistics, style, and historical content to best determine when they were written.

The Book of Genesis has been described as a compendium of ancient folklore, written between approximately 900 BC. C. and the VI century a. The books of Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy were written during almost the same period, although they portray legendary events of century XIV a. C. Scholars are forced to examine them, passage by passage, to identify the addition of mate.

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Old Testament

Very few of the Old Testament books were written close to the period described. We have to look at the linguistics, style, and historical content to best determine when they were written.

The Book of Genesis has been described as a compendium of ancient folklore, written between approximately 900 BC. C. and the VI century a. The books of Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy were written during almost the same period, although they portray legendary events of century XIV a. C. Scholars are forced to examine them, passage by passage, to identify the addition of material from different authors of different origins.

The Deuteronomic History (Joshua, Judges, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings and 2 Kings) form a unit of style and content that points to a single author. History is believed to have been written in the 7th century BC. C., in addition to numerous changes and additions to these books.

The Book of Chronicles covers roughly the same period, but it was written after the Babylonian exile.

The Book of Isaiah was actually written by three main authors, who wrote their respective contributions towards the end of their respective periods.

The books of Job, Ruth, Esther, and Daniel were novels from the 2nd century BC. C. based on previous historical periods. There are anachronisms that help identify the dates they were compiled, as well as linguistic uses that provide a term post quem.

The following table, summarized from Dating the Bible - Wikipedia is a complete and relatively accurate summary of the Old Testament books:

New Testament

We know from synoptic analysis that the Gospel of Mark was the first New Testament gospel to be written. Chapter 13, which includes a prophecy of the First Roman-Jewish War and the civil war that broke out within the city even as the Romans besieged the walls, provides the main evidence that it was written in approximately 70 CE. It is true that Jesus could have prophesied these events as stated, but the prophecy also includes the return of Jesus in clouds of glory within the lives of some to whom Jesus spoke. This did not happen, and since it is not acceptable for Jesus to prophesy something that did not happen, the author of Mark must have already known about the War and the associated events. There are ways to establish that Matthew was probably written a little before Luke, so it is reasonable to date it to the 80s of the first century. with Luke in the 1990s. The Gospel of Luke probably also uses material from Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews, published around 93 CE. Most New Testament scholars now say that the Gospel of John was loosely based on the Gospel of Luke, placing it in the early second century.

Acts of the Apostles was written shortly after the Gospel of Luke and by the same author. This shows strong evidence of having used material from Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews, published around 93 CE. Acts has long dated back to the end of the first century, but now there is a growing consensus that it must have been written shortly after the turn of the century.

Paul's thirteen epistles have traditionally been dated to the 1950s and early 1960s. However, most scholars believe that only seven of the Pauline epistles are genuine: Romans, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Philemon, Galatians, Philippians and 1 Thessalonians. The 'Deutero-Pauline' epistles (2 Thessalonians, Ephesians, and Colossians) were written later in the first century and the pastoral epistles (1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and Titus) can be dated by subject to the early second century.

The Book of Hebrews, once wrongly attributed to Paul, must have been written at roughly the same time as his epistles, due to early Christology.

The Second Epistle of Peter was the last book of the Bible to be written and pseudoepigraphically written in the late first half of the second century. 2 Peter 3:16 refers to "all" of Paul's epistles as if recognizing that the list was closed, and he referred to them as if they were already considered "Scripture." 2 Peter borrows themes from the Epistle of Judas, which identifies itself as written in the second century. The First Epistle of Peter was also written pseudoepigraphically, some time after the destruction of the Jerusalem temple in 70 CE, as evidenced by the reference to “Babylon” in 1 Peter 5:13. That coded reference to Rome would not have made sense before Rome destroyed the temple, just as Babylon had centuries before.

The Epistles of John (1 John, 2 John, 3 John) must have been written shortly after the Gospel of John, which I mentioned earlier as written in the early second century.

The Book of Revelation is an enigma, dated around 96 CE due to the context of persecution, but modern historians are no longer sure that there was a period of persecution at that time. Year 96 is still supported because there are no other tests from a different year.

The story of Job is very difficult to read because at first glance it seems so unsatisfactory. Job endures all these amazing problems and questions God. But God never answers Job directly, He just asks Job a bunch of questions that seem to say, "I've lived longer and done more important things than you, so who are you to question me?"

However, when you live with it for a while and begin to discover the bigger picture of God and theodicy, the question of why God allowed evil and what are God's goals for the human race, some very luminous ideas emerge. .

Simply put, James tells us in chapter 5 of the book of

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The story of Job is very difficult to read because at first glance it seems so unsatisfactory. Job endures all these amazing problems and questions God. But God never answers Job directly, He just asks Job a bunch of questions that seem to say, "I've lived longer and done more important things than you, so who are you to question me?"

However, when you live with it for a while and begin to discover the bigger picture of God and theodicy, the question of why God allowed evil and what are God's goals for the human race, some very luminous ideas emerge. .

Simply put, James tells us in chapter 5 of the book of James that Job, through his troubles, found his way to the "end" of God. James observes that God's goal or purpose in dealing with humanity is to show compassion.

How is God showing compassion when he puts Job in such an outrageous problem?

According to the biblical account, Job lived about 70 years before his troubles came. Then his fortune recovered and he lived 140 more years. You could say that Job lived a full life and then got twice the life he had before. He also got exactly twice the wealth he had before, and he was a wealthy man before his troubles.

In the patriarchal Jewish culture, the "double blessing" is what the firstborn received. So Job becomes an image or archetype of what the New Testament calls the "Church of the Firstborn" - the true and faithful followers of Jesus. (There is no denomination that can claim to have most or all of these overcomers within it. God silently chooses good fruit wherever He sees it).

The point is that the Bible seems fairly consistent in stating that in the end there will be a group of people who will constitute the spiritual "bride of Christ," the "heirs of God, joint heirs with Christ" who will be elevated to leadership and service in the name of God. rest of the human race. Your reward will be to serve and act as mediators between God and men in the future age of grace, commonly called the Millennium.

Job, in the picture, experiences that kind of change in his luck: the "double blessing." But not before he loses everything: his ten children, his wealth, his health.

Right now I am in the process of serializing my version of the Job story on Quora. The first installment focused on depression and what a process of struggling with ourselves is like: turning our anger inward, as women tend to do, or turning it outward and trying to heal our self-image through great internal dialogue or aggressive speech and behavior towards others. The best description of this pattern in men is I don't want to talk about it by Terrence Real. Job shows both ways of dealing with his problems.

The first part also defines the ancient sport of shadow boxing, talks about Paul's use of the term in his epistle to the Corinthians, and relates it to depression, which could be called "fighting ourselves." He then discusses how often Christians get depressed and presents how we will view Job's story in this context.

The second part is here. See a bird's-eye view of Job: what happened in the story and how God is also put to the test in the story. It points out what James the Righteous (the writer of the book of James, who was also Jesus' half brother) had to say about Job and about God: that Job discovered or revealed the end of God. What is the end, goal, or purpose of God? The blessing of all the families of the earth, which is the golden thread of the Bible.

The third part is being written now. You will go into much more detail about the process and progress of depression. How it works, how it is a natural survival mechanism that is understandable in light of the immense pressures humans face in this broken world. We will follow the depression in Job's response in conversations with his friends and with God.

Part 4 and later will look at more of the people in the Bible who struggled with themselves (sometimes depressed) and what we can learn from their experiences.

Romans 15: 4 tells us: "Everything that is written in the scriptures was written to teach us, so that we can have hope through the patience and encouragement that the scriptures give us."

All the Scriptures have to do with our Savior Jesus Christ and our salvation by grace through faith. It takes a quick background to understand Job's mindset before and during his trial, until the Lord responded:

Grace is a person. His name is Jesus Christ. Titus 2:11 says of him:

"The wonderful grace of God has been manifested in person, bringing salvation to all."

Verse 14 of the same Tit

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Romans 15: 4 tells us: "Everything that is written in the scriptures was written to teach us, so that we can have hope through the patience and encouragement that the scriptures give us."

All the Scriptures have to do with our Savior Jesus Christ and our salvation by grace through faith. It takes a quick background to understand Job's mindset before and during his trial, until the Lord responded:

Grace is a person. His name is Jesus Christ. Titus 2:11 says of him:

"The wonderful grace of God has been manifested in person, bringing salvation to all."

Verse 14 of Titus 2 himself says: "He gave his life to free us from all kinds of sin, to cleanse us and make us his own people, totally committed to doing good works."

He is the reason for our justification and eternal salvation, even from wrath, as it is written in Romans 5: 9-

"Therefore, since we have now been justified declared free from the guilt of sin by his blood, how much more certain is it that we will be saved from the wrath of God through him."

Unfortunately, in many places of worship, Romans 5: 9 above is interpreted as:

"Since we have been justified / declared free from the guilt of sin by the blood of Jesus, we have to do our best to be free from sin and free from guilt on our own so that we can be saved from the wrath of God and maintain our prosperity. "

Such teaching seems moral but subtly rests trust in the arm of the flesh (human effort) for the achievement of good, also known as piety (being like God). It is no different from the false doctrine that Satan sold to Eve in Eden. Always behind such statements of the antichrist is the yearning for self and self-glorification hidden under the guise of piety and morality - "Yes, we are in Christ, but we still have to ..." - when in reality, one simply does not it can be in Christ. without living well. Be careful with those preachers. Having your mindset is nothing more than Pride itself, also known as:

"Worthy is the Lamb that was slain and I ... I also did my part being obedient and I had the good sense to pray and be diligent and xyz and that is why God made an abc for me."

Our Maker says: "There is no other good but God." But those false teachers, under the guise of morality and godliness, challenge God by presuming that they can produce even an ounce of good and be free from guilt and wrath in their own power, without Christ. Enter work. Everyone needs to learn a lesson or two from Job, who had the same "I'm a good person" mentality before God opened his spiritual eyes.

Job's life consisted of doing good works and doing everything possible to be on God's right side. However, a calamity befell him. Job claimed the following as his resume for the honor he received from men and why he did not deserve to endure their suffering:

“11 For when the ear heard, it called me happy and blessed me; And when the eye saw, it testified for me with approval,

12 For I delivered the poor who cried out, the fatherless, and the one who had no one to help him.

13 The blessing of him who was about to perish came upon me, and I made the widow's heart sing for joy.

14 I clothed myself in righteousness, and she clothed me or clothed me; My righteousness was like a cloak and a turban or a diadem or a crown!

15 I was eyes to the blind, and feet were to the lame.

16 I was the father of the poor and needy; the cause of him did not know what I looked for ".

Job really thought he did all this and much more with his arm of flesh (human effort) that God's word says will fail. Also see his words in Job 27: 1-2--

“1 Job resumed his speech and said: 2 As God lives, who has taken away my right and denied me justice, and the Almighty, who has afflicted and embittered my life,

He thought that he did not deserve what he was receiving. Finally, he saw the truth and wrote "I hate myself ..."

Then Job thought that his righteous deeds, such as being "eyes to the blind" and helping the poor, stemmed from his personal goodness and that his prosperity and protection mattered in the matter. He even sought and received approval and testimony for being a good / righteous person of man -

"And when an eye saw me, it testified for me approvingly,"

But man cannot see how God sees. Christ tells us that works held in high esteem by men are an abomination to God:

“And the Pharisees, who were lovers of money, also heard all these things, and they made fun of him. And he said to them: “You are the ones who justify yourselves before men, but God knows your hearts. Because what men hold in high esteem is an abomination in the eyes of God. " Luke 16: 14-15

Job listed his righteous deeds as his defense of why he shouldn't suffer. We also see a snapshot of Job's heart in chapter 1, where he thought that his sacrifices to God on behalf of his children after the birthday party was what caused God to protect them from danger. Isaiah 64: 6 shows us what God really thinks of those righteous deeds and the "hard work" that many cling to as the reason for their success or God blesses them and protects them from wrath:

"We are all like an unclean, all our supposed righteous acts are like a menstrual cloth in Your eyes."

The ONLY reason that Job was prosperous and protected is written for us and is recognized by Satan as we see in the accuser's words to God in the book of Job itself:

“Have you not put a hedge around him and his house and everything he has? You have blessed the work of their hands, so that their flocks and herds are scattered throughout the land. "Job 1:10.

Very significant is the word "hedge" in this passage. It is translated from the Hebrew word "suwk", which has the following meaning:

"entwine, that is, enclose (for formation, protection or containment): - close, (make a) hedge (above)."

Hold on to "hold back."

Job thought that his righteous deeds, such as "being eyes to the blind" and helping the poor, mattered when it came to his prosperity or being blessed. Like many parishioners today and yours before Grace found me and took me away, Job had no idea that it was because of God's restriction, the COVERAGE of protection, that he could even begin to do any of the things of which he boasted. Without that restriction that God put in place, Job's suffering could have started earlier and surely ended in death. All that is needed is for Satan the accuser, also known as a prosecutor, to call your number before the judge. This is why Satan has to find someone to devour. You are looking for people who think that it is their being eyes to the blind,

Satan is the accuser, also known as a prosecutor. HaSatan is literally "fiscal" in Hebrew. Satan cannot just go around arbitrarily killing and cursing people and so forth, just as an earthly lawyer cannot arbitrarily throw a criminal in jail. The LAW decides that. The law is what Satan uses to bring charges against the sinner and put him in the prison of famine, disease, and death. The law is the only weapon in Satan's arsenal and it condemns the best of those who try to keep it, that is, they depend on their works to get God to do something for them; And no matter how good a person is, we all deserved to go to Job's kind of prison. All have sinned. James 2:10 says:

"Because anyone who keeps all the law, but stumbles at one point, becomes guilty of all."

All men are guilty by default. The only language that the defense attorney, also known as Satan the Accuser, understands for his accusations against anyone to fail is the blood of Jesus by which we are justified declared free from the guilt of sin before God the Just Judge. it is the blood of Jesus-

"Therefore, since we have now been justified declared free from the guilt of sin by his blood, how much more certain is it that we will be saved from the wrath of God through him." Romans 5: 9.

It is a legal battle that we are in this war. It is sad to see parishioners trying to free themselves from demonic oppression, generational curse and poverty by fasting for 70 days or trying to be godly (to be like God) in order to "not perish, but have eternal life." First of all, Christ says immediately after the popular John 3: 16-

"He who believes in him is not condemned, but he who does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God." John 3:18.

The MSG version puts it this way: "Anyone who trusts Him is acquitted; anyone who refuses to trust Him has long been under the penalty of death without knowing it. And why? A loving Son of God when was presented to him. "

Do you observe the previous judicial terms? Go to any court of law and see what happens to a person who has been convicted or was not acquitted of a crime whose penalty is death.

Those who are fasting and sowing seed to be acquitted and thus freed from the clutches of Satan the prosecutor and the prison of death are already condemned and even in the prison of death (preceded by earthly evils such as those that happened to Job) where they are subject to the jailers of poverty and demonic oppression, BECAUSE they are not justified by the blood of Jesus but by his fasting and other works.

Demonic oppression, disease, and poverty are mere prison guards. Trying to escape them by fasting and sowing seeds is similar to a prisoner sentenced to death in a maximum security prison who tries to escape from a prison warden who always beats him by fasting and praying to the judge to release him. The law has condemned it. There must be a just basis for acquittal. Only by having Christ as our righteousness and bearer of sins are we absolved of guilt and thus free from the prison of sin and death.

But by the restrictive hand of God (the COVER) that is preventing Satan from exercising the law on many parishioners who think it is because of the money they give to the poor, etc. and that they are still going around trying to do things like sowing and fasting in an attempt to prevent anger from overtaking them, many would be experiencing Job's situation today. I am not beating, sowing seeds and fasting. The reason for these works is crucial. It is a dead work if one believes that those activities are the ones that will push God to protect or provide for him, as useless as Job thinking that his children will not die if he made sacrifices for them.

Job thought it was "good" when God's Word says "There is no one good but God." Beloved, the gracious and restraining hand of God is the only thing standing between the one who trusts in the least bit and him facing the accusations of Satan the Accuser as did Job. Without his restraining hand, all of Job's unnecessary attempts to preserve the lives of his children with his strength and his "being eyes to the blind" and to help the poor would be utterly impossible. Yet today many boast of these same works. Some even present such works (for example, I fasted for 70 days and prayed for 24 hours) as their defense when bad things start to happen to them. Much to say here.

"24 So God removed their restraining hand and allowed them to fully express their sinful and shameful desires ..."

The wages of sin is death. This death is not just a physical death. It is translated from the Greek word "thanatos" which means-

"the misery of the soul that arises from sin, which begins on earth but lasts and increases after the death of the body in hell."

In essence, sickness, deprivation, depression, stupid mistakes, low IQ / IQ, working so hard and having so little to show for it, and Job's tribulations, all of these things are "the beginning of death." This death was man's fate by default, that God's protective / restraining hand is preventing many people from experiencing and that many parishioners and non-believers think they are not experiencing because of their intelligence and non-existent good.

If God removed His restraining hand - the COVER - that prevents man from engaging in heinous sins AND pays the wages of sin as He did when He briefly lifted His restraint / fence with Job; If Satan, the lawyer, were to call someone's number, a portion or more of Job's ordeal can be expected regardless of his fasts and seeds.

Job goes on to talk more about his good works in Job 31, which include:

"25 Didn't I cry for him who was in distress? Didn't my heart grow sad for the poor and needy? 26 But when I waited for good, evil came to me; and when I waited for light, darkness came."

In essence, Job expected God to bless him because of the "good" things that he did not know was because God blessed him and prevented him from experiencing what he really deserved to be able to do ANY of those good things that he attributed to his own effort.

After Job recited his good works as his defense of why he shouldn't be experiencing the things he did, essentially defying God, God answered him with a series of questions and statements that showed Job how completely wrong he was in his thinking. In Job 40:14, he said to Job:

"If you can do all this, Job, demonstrating your divine power then I God will also praise you and acknowledge that your own right hand can save you."

Another version says, "If you can do that, then I myself will praise you, because you are strong enough to save yourself."

In essence, the right hand of man to save himself with his works is useless. The arm of flesh (the human strength to be anything) will fail. And Job changed his mind. He said of our Lord God:

"5 I had heard of you only by the ear of the ear, but now my spiritual eye ​​sees you. 6 Therefore, I detest my words and hate myself and repent to dust and ashes."

May the Lord open our eyes to see the complete rottenness and helplessness of the flesh, also known as human strength; to see that it is because of His mercy / covering / restraining hand that we are not consumed by sin and its wages (death and its "death started" symptoms such as poverty and all the terrible that Job experienced) and not useless, arm from flesh-driven attempts to be godly (to be like God) or those useless "good" works that many of us depend on in an effort to get God to bless, reject Satan's accusations, or save ourselves from wrath .

But beloved, in Christ, we have MUCH MORE than God's restraining hand or His hedge that keeps us from experiencing the wages of sin in the form of "death begun" like Job. In the midst of his suffering, Job prayed a prayer:

"33 If only there were someone who MEDIA among us, someone who would unite us, 34 someone who would take away the rod of God, so that His terror would not scare me anymore. 35 Then I would speak without fear of Him, but since He is with me now, can not ". Work 9

Job did not have that "Someone" to save him from the wrath of the law, which was the destiny of all mankind, no matter how good or sinless he tried to be one. But believer in Christ, we do. His name is Jesus Christ. 1 Timothy 2 tells us:

"5 Porque hay sólo un Dios, y sólo un Mediador entre Dios y los hombres, Jesucristo Hombre, 6 quien se dio a sí mismo en rescate por todos los pueblos, un hecho que fue atestiguado a la derecha y momento apropiado."

Esta es nuestra herencia porque nuestro amoroso Dios entregó a su propio Hijo para ser nuestro Mediador:

"And there is still much more to say of His unfailing love for us! For through the blood of Jesus we have heard the powerful declaration, “You are now righteous in My sight.” And because of the sacrifice of Jesus, you will never experience the wrath of God."

God is a just God and cannot sweep sin under the carpet. All have sinned. What we all deserved was the fate of Job and worse, unto death and death in hell- no matter how good we were or tried to be. It is His restraining hand that keeps man from collapsing into the sins-ridden mass of flesh that man is of himself so none can take credit for being a good person. Because of what God has done, we who believe Jesus Christ can NEVER experience wrath. Only by the blood of Jesus are we 100% free from the guilt for sin which Satan uses to unleash the righteous demands of the law for sins (wrath) on man as he did Job. See this in Roman's 5:9-

"Therefore, since we have now been justified declared free of the guilt of sin by His blood, how much more certain is it that we will be saved from the wrath of God through Him." Romans 5:9.

Beloved, let's take our blessed brains church: if we have no sins, why would we need salvation from wrath? If we have no sins, why would we need to be declared free of the guilt of sin by the blood of Jesus? Only the one who has sins needs saving from guilt and wrath. Wrath entails every earthly ill such as lack and depression as well as death in hell. In Christ, God sees us as righteous, "even though we are guilty of many sins." --

"And the result of God’s gracious gift is very different from the result of that one man’s sin. For Adam’s sin led to condemnation, but God’s free gift leads to our being made right with God, even though we are guilty of many sins." Romans 5:16.

This truth (God's word!) is very hard to swallow for those who still trust their ability to even put one leg in front of the other and are yet to understand that the only thing standing between them and Job's painful experience is God's hedge/restraining hand; it is hard to swallow for those who are yet to abhor themselves as Job did when his spiritual eyes were opened to his uncleanness of himself despite his many good works or as Paul did when he wrote "In my flesh dwells no good thing." Such cannot but see God's Way of Salvation as license to sin and so plod on in that prideful walk of trust in human strength for the attainment of good (be like God) when God's word says "There is none good but God." Beloved, let's not be found here. In the Wisdom of God whose ways and thoughts are higher than man's, only by receiving His abundance of Grace and His gift of Righteousness to us in Christ do we get to live in triumph over sin and death (plus the "death begun" that Job experienced)-

"And the result of God’s gracious gift is very different from the result of that one man’s sin. For Adam’s sin led to condemnation, but God’s free gift leads to our being made right with God, even though we are guilty of many sins. 17 For the sin of this one man, Adam, caused death to rule over many. But even greater is God’s wonderful grace and His gift of righteousness, for all who receive it will live in triumph over sin and death through this one Man, Jesus Christ." Romans 5:16-17.

When your believing is right, right living will follow.

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