What is the biggest mistake you made during an interview?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Billy Cooper



What is the biggest mistake you made during an interview?

They never said it!

So once I went to an interview with a global tech giant (name is given at the end). After a quick initial HR interview on call, probably to find out the basic setting, I was immediately called into their office for a series of interviews. Just outside the block, there was unlimited food beautifully placed in bakery baskets, for you to pick up freely as you walk, to eat anytime you want: donuts, fresh fruits, chilled juices, and sodas. Everything I had heard about this company was true.

The local HR showed me the room and told me not to touch anything and the moni

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They never said it!

So once I went to an interview with a global tech giant (name is given at the end). After a quick initial HR interview on call, probably to find out the basic setting, I was immediately called into their office for a series of interviews. Just outside the block, there was unlimited food beautifully placed in bakery baskets, for you to pick up freely as you walk, to eat anytime you want: donuts, fresh fruits, chilled juices, and sodas. Everything I had heard about this company was true.

The local HR department showed me the room and instructed me not to touch anything and the monitor will automatically start each time the interview starts. I asked him about the whole process of the day to which he said he did not know and that only the interviewer can tell and he disappeared, practically without interest. It was a bit strange, but I thought, this HR was probably brand new and you were given this task as a last minute add-on and you probably had no idea.

It was a series of VC interviews, he gave the first one and it came out really well. The interviewer was a young man, so probably someone who can work with me or be subordinate to me on the proposed team. Technical in nature, but fairly basic questions. In the end, he signed on a very positive note. The next interview was with someone a little older, it was about advanced technical aspects and analysis and scenarios released and strategies to do it. This one was excellent too. He told me to wait for the next interview. The third round was with a very senior lady who had worked with the company for 20 years, as she said. She was aware of the questions asked in the previous 2 rounds (some were repeated), so she said she will give a different direction to the interview.

Not knowing how many interviews were scheduled, I asked the third interviewer about the remaining process, to which she smiled and replied to wait for the next HR interview. I knew what it meant. I was glad to know that all the main rounds have been cleared and now only the HR round is pending and I waited patiently in that very small room that only had a desk and a glass door. Generally, there was a 45 minute to 1 hour interval between each interview, the interviewers were probably passing feedback. They told me there could be a series of interviews (not exactly how many rounds), so I kept sitting in front of the webcam,

Anyway, the office environment was as expected, employees in T-shirts sitting on beanbags working with Apple on their laps with their headphones on and I realized they weren't working headphones. It was a casual and quiet work environment ... perfect where no one talks about others or interrupts others, everyone concentrates on their work. I come from a number of formal and highly structured work environments where beanbags or jeans will be considered an insult to the company.

Coming back ... I was waiting for the HR round. I was expecting this to happen after a 45 minute to 1 hour interval as well. Within 1-2 minutes of the completion of the interview, the local HR department rushes up to me, rushes open the door, and quickly says, "we're done for the day." And I couldn't believe it, I thought this HR was wrong. I told him, the third interviewer told me to wait for the HR round just 2 minutes ago! And he was hell-bent on saying, "I don't know much about it, but if so, they will contact you" (which I know what it means). And he motioned for me to leave immediately. He was in total disbelief at what had just happened and how he suddenly went in the opposite direction. The 3 rounds of technology went very well, the last 2 told me to wait for the next round. As I walked away I kept thinking what happens if the next round starts and the monitor turns on as usual, but they don't find me there. But, the local HR department was only interested in quickly making sure he was off the premises and he was out in 30 seconds max.

I still thought about waiting for the HR mail / call to resume the final round ... and waited ... and waited. I wrote an email explaining the whole thing asking about my pending HR round. And after 3 weeks, I get an email to apply next time. And I was like what really happened! I called HR and told her all over again, I couldn't say much like HR generally does. I wanted to hang up quickly but I wanted to know what happened, so then I asked her for feedback (to find out what went wrong) to which she replied, she has not received a feedback on my interview. I insisted, that it turned out well according to what the interviewers themselves told, and she was attached to that that is all the information she has,

The company was Google.

Needless to say, I never reapplied and do not plan to do so. I still don't know what went wrong, but luckily since my interviews went well as stated during the interviews themselves (and not said to be polite or friendly), I guess there was something wrong with Google. Since this is India where anything can happen (even on Google) the only thing I could think of was the local HR department or someone who probably wanted the job to go to their friend to get the referral bonus and therefore wanted me out. LOL!!!

The internal recruiter for a Christian SaaS company contacted me at a time when I was very open to a new job. Excited about my skill set (and belief set, for that matter), he scheduled a phone interview with him and another member of the HR team. That interview went very well and they invited me to participate in the real one.

I knew about the company and visited their website on the day of my interview to familiarize myself with their products and services. While I hadn't been interviewed in a few years (I wasn't in full job search mode yet, after all), I am confident in my interview with abi.

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The internal recruiter for a Christian SaaS company contacted me at a time when I was very open to a new job. Excited about my skill set (and belief set, for that matter), he scheduled a phone interview with him and another member of the HR team. That interview went very well and they invited me to participate in the real one.

I knew about the company and visited their website on the day of my interview to familiarize myself with their products and services. While I hadn't been interviewed in a few years (I wasn't in full job search mode yet, after all), I am confident in my ability to interview. I'm not particularly nervous, I'm easy to talk to and knowledgeable in my field, and I've been offered most of the jobs I've interviewed for.

Upon arrival, I was escorted into the boardroom where the founder / president was sitting, along with half a dozen other senior staff. We were barely five minutes into the interview, right after the compliments, when the president asked me what I thought his company was doing. I gave a short description based on what the recruiter had told me and the information I had read earlier that day.

"Why do you want to work here if you don't know what we do?" he asked, sounding annoyed. My blood ran cold. I managed to start speaking before realizing that the question could have been rhetorical. He interrupted me to explain where I was wrong, but from what he said, it was clear that my answer had not been wrong, just not complete enough.

"I don't think you want this job," he continued. “I think what you want is any job, and this was an interview that happened to you. Let me give you some professional advice. "

Then he spent about five minutes (they felt like 60) lecturing me on career paths, interview preparation, and general integrity in front of his entire executive team. I wasn't the only one squirming: the rest of the participants were staring at the conference table the entire time, and the faces of the HR guys seemed to be hurting.

The interview was basically over by that time, but the other executives awkwardly asked a few more questions they had prepared and I answered. Then they took me to another room to take the agreed upon code test, which I seriously debated opting out of. (I probably should have, I hadn't used a Mac in a while, and it took me most of my time to realize that I couldn't make anything look right because the text editor I had chosen was removing my simple CSS code .) The HR guy then led me on what must have been the most uncomfortable tour those offices have ever seen.

It wasn't until I left the interview that I began to feel less embarrassed and more angry. His company had reached out to me, after all; I hadn't even "gotten an interview" but had been invited to one. Also, his unsolicited "advice" was unprofessional and was based on knowing almost nothing about me. I'm very glad I didn't get the job, but I consider not spending more time researching the company is my biggest mistake in the interview.


Bonus answer:

My second biggest mistake was interviewing me, in all seriousness, for an industrial position at a company in Redmond, WA. It was a day-long interview that I was flown to, so I got to know the hiring manager quite well after two meals and several hours together.

I didn't get the position, and when I asked him for feedback (something I do to help with future interviews), he revealed that the main reason he hadn't hired me was because he thought I'd get lost with Microsoft. In fact, he suspected he was using it to get to Microsoft.

I was surprised. He had commented on my Windows Phone over lunch, and we talked at length about my affinity for Microsoft products, but I had no idea where his mind was going. He even took me around the Microsoft campus to take a look on the way to dinner, and I thought he was being a nice tourist host.

I never thought about our conversation, and I certainly had no intention of working at Microsoft, much less expressing something like that. However, I think I can understand your hesitation before paying for the relocation expenses of a new employee.

I think.


Bonus Answer 2

My third biggest mistake was also unintentional: I simply gave the founder and CEO of a digital marketing agency the notion that I was not interested in the position. Otherwise! It was a great position, with good pay, a short distance from my home, and I applied for the position and showed up for the interview on time and prepared.

One of the first questions the hiring manager asked was why I was leaving my current position. As he responded, I told him that this interview with him was the first of my job search. In other words, I had just officially started looking for a job and my interview with him was my first interview. This was a fact, and not particularly offensive.

According to his email response to my follow-up, he was eminently qualified and a perfect fit for the position, but that single comment hinted that he was anticipating other interviews at other companies, revealing that he was not interested in the position.

Unfortunately, no amount of backtracking could explain it, and he remained convinced that he really didn't want to work there. I wonder why he didn't just ask me if I meant something by that instead of assigning me reasons that just weren't there.

I don't think saying that an interview is my "first" is a code for "I really don't want to work here" or "I don't expect to get this job." On the other hand, isn't prudence and reason shown when entering a job search with the expectation of having to interview for multiple positions?


I only look back to learn ... everything happens for a reason. :)

Entering the interview dressed as a woman.

I had been unemployed for about 4 months and the day when I would run out of liquid assets was fast approaching. He desperately needed a job; unemployment does NOT pay the bills.

I am a mature transgender woman and had agonized over whether to present myself in my preferred gender expression or, once again, to present myself as a man; an expression that I really abhor.

I had researched the company and was confident that its diversity policy would cover me, but had not taken into account the potential for individual biases. I arrived with loose hair and a light hairstyle

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Entering the interview dressed as a woman.

I had been unemployed for about 4 months and the day when I would run out of liquid assets was fast approaching. He desperately needed a job; unemployment does NOT pay the bills.

I am a mature transgender woman and had agonized over whether to present myself in my preferred gender expression or, once again, to present myself as a man; an expression that I really abhor.

I had researched the company and was confident that its diversity policy would cover me, but had not taken into account the potential for individual biases. I arrived with loose hair and a light hairstyle, a pair of relatively loose ladies' Dickies, an understated blouse, conservative flats, very light makeup, and little jewelry. The woman from the Service Desk, without blinking at my introduction, directed me to the back of the store where the interviews were taking place. Being the punctual person that I am, I was just on time, but the hiring manager was not in his office and would not be back for 15 minutes. That was enough time for me to start questioning my choice of outfit, especially since the other applicants in the waiting room kept looking in my direction and,

Since I was closer to the door, I was the first person the hiring manager saw when he walked in. I've gotten pretty good at reading people after more years in retail than I'd like to admit, but it didn't take that skill to see the disgust on their face when they saw me. He expressed his apologies for being late and said he would call us based on our arrival time; We were asked to sign a register when we arrived.

The company was going through a huge hiring push, and the waiting room was packed with people to the point where newcomers were asked to wait in the hallway. One by one, the applicants dwindled and I noticed that the people who had come after me were called before me. The situation did nothing to calm my inner turmoil.

I wasn't the last to call, but I definitely had the shortest interview. When I walked into his office, I saw a sheaf of papers titled Hire the Best on his desk. The interviewer took off her company apron and rubbed lotion on her arms as she asked the first question: Do you have any retail experience? I quickly summed up my experience and she asked me the second question: Do you know anything about wood? I told him about my extensive knowledge of home improvement and detailed the help I had given my friends with their own projects. She thanked me for my time and said she would be in touch.

A week went by with no contact, so I called. “You were supposed to call the Monday after your interview. We have chosen another candidate for the position, ”he said and almost hung up the phone.

I still needed a job and I reapplied on the company website a month later for a different position at a different location. I got another phone interview, I passed it (again) and they gave me an appointment for a face-to-face interview… in the same store as before… with the same woman.

This time, having failed miserably in my previous attempt, I chose to introduce myself as a man. The two interviews were so different that, even to this day, I am still amazed. The hiring manager greeted me with a smile and a handshake, didn't take off her company apron, picked up the hiring package, and asked very different questions. I'm pretty good at curveballs, but I was completely stumped when asked what I would do to save a sale when a potential customer told me they wouldn't buy anything after spending half an hour going over their project. Since closing a sale is so important, I felt like I had bombed in the worst way.

As I walked into her office, I found her with my hiring package in hand and a disturbed look on her face. "I interviewed you once before, right?" I just smiled, nodded, and sat down when she got a phone call from the assistant manager. At the end of the call, without saying a word, he handed me the consent forms. From that day until the day I moved in, she and I had an extremely troubled relationship that only got worse when I was promoted to her level as a department supervisor.

Since then I have come out completely transgender and enjoy the acceptance of my co-workers. After all, the company is inclusive and does everything it can to embrace diversity.

The biggest mistake I make during job interviews is selling myself less. I'm usually too modest about my own abilities and how they would allow me to excel beyond expectations at work. I often look back and find that I seriously downplayed my qualifications and / or experience, perhaps out of fear of disappointing them later if they decided to hire me. An even bigger mistake: I have a strong tendency to repeat this same mistake. It's just too ingrained in my nature not to be boastful, arrogant, or overconfident. There is a very fine art in meeting wi

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The biggest mistake I make during job interviews is selling myself less. I'm usually too modest about my own abilities and how they would allow me to excel beyond expectations at work. I often look back and find that I seriously downplayed my qualifications and / or experience, perhaps out of fear of disappointing them later if they decided to hire me. An even bigger mistake: I have a strong tendency to repeat this same mistake. It's just too ingrained in my nature not to be boastful, arrogant, or overconfident. There is a fine art to being sincere rather than arrogance, and I have yet to master it, preferring to err on the conservative side of quiet humility.

Perhaps another mistake (which I also find myself repeating) is simply not showing enough enthusiasm for the position I am applying for. Probably the most prominent way this manifests itself is the lack of "good questions" I have for them, usually towards the end of the interview, when they ask me if I have any questions for them. At times, it can seem awkwardly forced and artificial; They put me in the spot to pose some kind of smart / insightful question to ask them (about the team, the office culture, the company, how they differ from the competition, etc.), and I end up asking something that is clichéd (very boring; they've already been asked a thousand times) or no sequitur (uhmm ... really? Is that your question? Why do you ask that?).

Regardless of how qualified (or overqualified) you may be for a vacant position, if I'm not really on top of my game when I was interviewed (exuding great confidence and showing genuine interest in the company and team), it's almost a gamble. confident that they will hire someone else who actually shows more confidence and interest in your company, even if that other person is much less qualified and / or experienced.

Rather than reciting what everyone else has covered quite thoroughly on the subject, I will shift the focus of the discussion elsewhere.

And that is the big mistake it is to stop going to interviews, even if you have a job (except if you are 100% satisfied with it and you make very good money).

That's what I personally find a big mistake when it comes to interviews and I'll tell you why.

So you have a job for several years and are relatively satisfied with it (or not). It's not ideal, but it pays the bills and the market is shaky at the moment. There's no point moving on

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Rather than reciting what everyone else has covered quite thoroughly on the subject, I will shift the focus of the discussion elsewhere.

And that is the big mistake it is to stop going to interviews, even if you have a job (except if you are 100% satisfied with it and you make very good money).

That's what I personally find a big mistake when it comes to interviews and I'll tell you why.

So you have a job for several years and are relatively satisfied with it (or not). It's not ideal, but it pays the bills and the market is shaky at the moment. It doesn't make sense to keep going to interviews, right? Well, think again.

I have developed a strange "habit" in recent years. I go to interviews. It started as a result of my need to find something more fulfilling as far as my career is concerned, and maybe something more profitable (by the way, I have a job). So, I started looking for what was in it for me, what were my options, given the financial situation and the unemployment rate. Lately I realized that for some reason, unknown to me at the time, I have come to enjoy the process of going through an interview. This is the complete opposite of what most people feel when going to interviews. Interviews are exhausting, stressful, sometimes unpredictable, and honestly painful memories according to many job seekers.

This made me want to further examine the importance of going to interviews, even if one is currently employed. This is what my experience has taught me so far.

1. Being proactive helps a lot

In an age when there is nothing secure in the workplace and you may be out of work at any moment, acting proactively is of the utmost importance. Having as many viable options as possible beforehand, should that happen, can save you from the immense stress that comes with being fired. It also gives you time to evaluate all those options more calmly and patiently, and not in the light of "I need to find a job right now", which makes you much more prone to choosing the wrong solutions.

2. Understanding where the market is going is of utmost importance

What better way to learn about changes in your own field than by going to interviews and talking to managers? It informs you about new methods, trends, salary changes, benefits that other companies might have, requirements and qualifications that you may lack at the moment, and a million other things. You will also get a brief overview of the company cultures, what their mission is, and if that mission matches your personal goals and vision.

3. Networking is key

It's about meeting the right people, and not the "I was hired because my friend knew the hiring manager and he spoke well for me" kind of course. Having the right connections should be just an asset to getting the job and not a factor on its own (although the reality is sometimes very different). We have many more tools today to achieve efficient networking compared to the conventional ways of the past, but it has not lost its importance yet, whatever type it may be. You never know when a job opportunity that came up due to interview networking might come in handy. I had once been in an interview where the business owner was really interested in me and I was really interested in the company, although at that time we did not go to the next level for other reasons. However, the owner graciously honored me more than once later by making me a job offer. No deal was reached, once again, mainly because I was looking for a full time job and they couldn't offer one, but you get my point. You never know when networking will save you from a critical situation.

4. Having a sense of approval rejuvenates you.

For me, going to interviews is like having a date, you have the feeling that someone liked you enough (or in this case your resume) to want to see you again. This is tremendously important and is the main reason, I think, that candidates who are on job searches for a year with no offers of interviews are said to suffer from depression, etc. Not being asked to go to interviews equals rejection, and who can deal with rejection. effectively?

5. it's fun

Or at least, I personally find it funny. It takes a long time to master, and I can't say I have (I'm not even close to that point actually), but I certainly have more experience than I was at first. The more interviews you conduct, the more forms or answers you will establish to address difficult questions or problems that arise in that context. When this happens, you will feel much more relaxed, confident, and able to appreciate what you can learn from the situation. So in a way, being successful in interviews is an art unto itself, and art is fun, right?

It really has to do with the person, I guess. However, I believe that modern times demand restless people, people who are passionate about finding the best for themselves, especially in such vital areas as employment. Like the saying "The best is the enemy of the good", improving our job prospects depends solely on us and our need to keep evolving, even when we think we have reached a satisfactory point.

I hope I have helped introduce a different perspective on interviews!

  1. I was waiting in the lobby when the interview director arrived. He asked me if I wanted some water. Just to look positive, I said I would. Then he showed me the water dispenser. I grabbed a paper cup, yanked on the handle, and ... I broke it! The rest of the interview was just for formality.
  2. The interview went quite well. It was in an awkward place, a hotel room, because this was a regional sales position and I was meeting with the sales director from various states. He said ok, now I'm putting your name in the system. He opened his laptop and just as he was about to type, he looked at me and closed it.
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  1. I was waiting in the lobby when the interview director arrived. He asked me if I wanted some water. Just to look positive, I said I would. Then he showed me the water dispenser. I grabbed a paper cup, yanked on the handle, and ... I broke it! The rest of the interview was just for formality.
  2. The interview went quite well. It was in an awkward place, a hotel room, because this was a regional sales position and I was meeting with the sales director from various states. He said ok, now I'm putting your name in the system. He opened his laptop and just as I was about to type, he looked at me and closed the laptop. My mistake? Without having the slightest idea that he was testing my closing ability. I had to make one last move there, but didn't. Well, it wasn't the biggest mistake, but nonetheless.
  3. They were interviewing me at Ford headquarters. I had flown there from Cali, with my own money (first mistake). The person who arranged the interview was a third party and did not give me many details about the position (2nd error). My whole trip to Michigan was full of mistakes, which I'll spare you from (except one where I slept in JFK yes, transfer in NY !! and missed my flight), and I always had this silly doubt that all this from the interview may be a scam (the biggest mistake!). Anyway, the next morning (after a sleepless night in a friend's bedroom, another mistake), I run into the third and head to Dearborn to meet with Ford managers. But I am constantly skeptical. I get there and head to the lobby like they told me. I look at the phone book and can't find the name. I was enraged thinking I was scammed! I go to the next headquarters building (this is Ford's top secret research facility). Again I can't find the name. Finally I call the third party and ask him to send the manager down to the lobby to open the door for me (it's over, why bother). I'm half an hour late. The whole interview is awkward and I answered the question "why do you want to come to ME from Cali?" with an awkward joke that says "I'm sick of the bad weather in Cali." (?? th error). Anyway, that was another. The whole interview is awkward and I answered the question "why do you want to come to ME from Cali?" with an awkward joke that says "I'm sick of the bad weather in Cali." (?? th error). Anyway, that was another. The whole interview is awkward and I answered the question "
  4. This time I will fly to Philadelphia. I'm staying in a nice hotel and the manager, who is about my age, is about to meet me for breakfast. Well I lingered around the room too long that when he came I was still in the room check line and had to cut our presentation short to finish the process, as if that was the most important thing. Needless to say, that was another shot out the window (maybe for good purpose).

Not having a deep understanding of the company before entering. I soon realized that large companies apparently weren't interested in me, which is why I mostly sent resumes to small companies. By that I mean companies with 50 or fewer employees. You could rarely find out much about companies like that; it was more or less a case of cold knocks on the doors.

Sometimes I would send resumes to medium-sized companies and never get a response. But one day I did it ... from a regional home builder. In the first place, I thought they were just a local contractor when I could have easily learned otherwise. They were also public and witty

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Not having a deep understanding of the company before entering. I soon realized that large companies apparently weren't interested in me, which is why I mostly sent resumes to small companies. By that I mean companies with 50 or fewer employees. You could rarely find out much about companies like that; it was more or less a case of cold knocks on the doors.

Sometimes I would send resumes to medium-sized companies and never get a response. But one day I did it ... from a regional home builder. In the first place, I thought they were just a local contractor when I could have easily learned otherwise. They were also public and with branches in 7 cities, so I could have found out quite a bit about them.

Anyway, thinking of small businesses, I had about a paragraph of information on a couple of projects they build in my area. I assumed that I would meet with the owner or someone of high level. My first Uh Oh was when I met with the second assistant controller / data processing manager.

The companies I applied to weren't big enough to have an assistant controller, let alone a second. Then he says they have to compress the hiring cycle, so I can expect a decision within a month. One month? Where I got interviews, the owner liked you or not and the hiring process was roughly five minutes after you started the interview.

And then he told me that if I passed the first level, they would ask me to fly or drive to the corporate office in Sacramento. If I passed that level, I would be a finalist and they would ask me for an interview with the CFO in San Francisco.

Yeah, I screwed it up big time, without researching the company at all. Needless to say, the interview was cordial, quite short, and I was not invited back to Round 2 in Sacramento.

From my own experience, it is overexpressing competence, openly lying about skills and general knowledge.

I tend to give interpersonal interviews, feel the person, with unexpected, highly technical and unexpected questions. First I want to know how someone reacts with a team, discarding that, how the interviewee reacts in a mixed team environment (which is critical), then how the individual * knows * the field in general.
The interviewee rarely realizes what he was doing. I eliminated * a lot * of people who were incompatible for the specific position that had an open requirement. One that wa

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From my own experience, it is overexpressing competence, openly lying about skills and general knowledge.

I tend to give interpersonal interviews, feel the person, with unexpected, highly technical and unexpected questions. First I want to know how someone reacts with a team, discarding that, how the interviewee reacts in a mixed team environment (which is critical), then how the individual * knows * the field in general.
The interviewee rarely realizes what he was doing. I eliminated * a lot * of people who were incompatible for the specific position that had an open requirement. One that was brought on board, it was more than invaluable, it taught me * a lot *! Unfortunately, corporate management released it, due to its abrasiveness, which exceeded my own, with traction.
It was a real PIA to replace him, who later replaced me, after a heat injury and other health and family issues required my care in a temperate environment.

On my own, personal interviews, I use my own scope of knowledge, yearning to learn more, emphasis on triumphs that are public knowledge (or are clear knowledge base in the specific setting)
So my own advice, remembering when the Experience was * required * and not available, when I started in certain fields (I've had, in total, five careers in my 55 years of life), be honest.
Celebrate your knowledge and achievements, with some humility, recognize that you always have new things to learn.
Because, in fact, that is the truth.
We handled a minor infraction the week before I was fired, on Friday a week ago I had some errors documenting the handling of the infraction, largely due to some health concerns that management was very aware of.
Due to the specific conditions in which I was working, during a physical area transfer of responsibility transfer and lack of contract, I was still fired.
Which was a relief to me, in a way. I prefer engineering to the functions of the analyst position.
Which was also expressed during my first two interviews.
I'm good at both, I much prefer the ever-changing daily grind of technical issues, while still getting feedback from analysts, which I sincerely wanted, due to my previous position.
Now, I know the points of failure in the communication between the two levels and I can keep moving forward and still avoid getting bogged down in the management and politics that are there. ***

*** In a previous position, we had created an information security position, at each contracted level of our supported commands (US DoD). Like the first one, the CEO offered me a corporate position.
I have worked in corporate offices, in other positions.
I demanded a dangerous service payment or the deal was canceled.

The CEO was frankly delighted but, like I, objected to such a dangerous and novel position, in which they were both in the same position.
While I may be stupid, that is precisely what I am not. I want to long term and retire, at least in my 70 years, still earn money and a position for my company.
Hell, as I said on a bad day, feeling like shit from a weird cold, "I really need to retire and be independently rich," my wife said, "Fuck! You
would never do that, you would keep working, just not to bore you. ”
My wife is wise and quite correct. I will
continue as long as my interface keeps working, the improved interfaces keep working, and my own body keeps working.
In the military and in life, one thing has always been true. My main weapon is my mind. He's also the main breadwinner in the family and our retirement system sucks. Wrong.

I fainted.
It was a hot day in June. I was much younger then, 19 or maybe 20. The job wasn't a dream job or anything, just a gas station attendant, but it was the first shift and only a 15 minute walk from my house, which it was important because I don't have a car.
I was working the third shift at the time and my interview was at noon. I got off work at 6 in the morning, but I've never been the type to fall asleep as soon as you get off work. When 9 o'clock came, I gave up the idea of ​​sleeping beforehand and prepared for my interview. Even though I was only interviewing

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I fainted.
It was a hot day in June. I was much younger then, 19 or maybe 20. The job wasn't a dream job or anything, just a gas station attendant, but it was the first shift and only a 15 minute walk from my house, which it was important because I don't have a car.
I was working the third shift at the time and my interview was at noon. I got off work at 6 in the morning, but I've never been the type to fall asleep as soon as you get off work. When 9 o'clock came, I gave up the idea of ​​sleeping beforehand and prepared for my interview. Even though I was interviewing for a job at a gas station, I dressed well, you know, suit jacket, dress clothes, I believe in trying to make a good impression. After getting ready, it was around 10 in the morning and I decided to try watching TV until it was time to go.
I fell asleep.
I woke up at exactly 11:55 and got scared. I quickly glanced at myself in the mirror to make sure my appearance was acceptable and ran out of the house.
I ran all the way. It was very hot, like I said, but I managed to do it at exactly 12. I remember it was so hot that I felt like I was going to get sick and even though I wanted to have a quick drink, the manager was waiting for me. so we dive into the interview. I remember following him to the back, trying to listen and answer his questions while also trying to calm my rapid heartbeat.
I remember him saying that he doesn't like to hire sick people. That their biggest problem was the unreliable employees who were sick all the time. He was about to assure her that he had a tough build when the world was swirling around and everything went black.
When I regained consciousness, I was on the floor and the manager was next to me. He was very nice, he gave me a drink, he made me sit until he was sure I was okay. He even tried calling an ambulance. I assured him that I was fine, that my problem was just running too far on a hot day with too many clothes on. He definitely didn't believe me. After joining me, he promised to call me once his round of interviews was over, but of course I never heard from him. However, I am sure I left an impression. That's something.

My biggest mistake was talking about someone during an interview. Usually people will see the negative side first before they can judge their positive qualities.

I went to an interview for a position as a research assistant. This position was presented by my classmate. My friend told me that I was one of the few people who could be chosen for the position.

I passed the CV stage and had my interview the following week. I had the interview with the project leader, while her two assistants (my friend was also there) were by our side listening to what we said in the same room.

After a few weeks, my friend went

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My biggest mistake was talking about someone during an interview. Usually people will see the negative side first before they can judge their positive qualities.

I went to an interview for a position as a research assistant. This position was presented by my classmate. My friend told me that I was one of the few people who could be chosen for the position.

I passed the CV stage and had my interview the following week. I had the interview with the project leader, while her two assistants (my friend was also there) were by our side listening to what we said in the same room.

Within a few weeks, my friend called me to tell me that I did not pass the interview stage and asked me to come to his office to tell me the full reason why I was not chosen.

He told me that he had said something wrong during the interview. He said that the words I have used to describe my lecturer make it look like I have stabbed my own lecturer in the back.

Let me listen to the phrases that I said during the interview. It may not be exactly what I said, but I did my best to remember it:

My supervisor is a good person and he always motivated me to do my project. Every time I finish a task, she always fills my plates, so I hardly finish the plates. But that way, I feel more accomplished in terms of my project progress and I was glad to be on his team.

Perhaps it was the biggest mistake I made in my life, said during an interview.

I wanted to say that I loved the hardworking supervisor, as I also do hard work for them. It also encourages me to finish many tasks and feel more successful. Yes, I am a mild and sadistic person who loves overworked work.

I don't think anyone understands that concept. My classmate who has been with me for four years should be able to see how hardworking I was during my lab time and should be able to support me.

Instead, he just nodded to the project leader like this. What a good friend.

He called my own supervisor a traitor and said a little more: “What if you leave this place and go to work for another company? Then you will speak ill of us with that company. So we don't want those kinds of people in our place. "

It hurt a lot after he said that. It was a real wake-up call for me.

I never intended to backstab my own teacher because she is my biggest supporter and the unforgettable teacher I have ever met in my college life. She has helped me a lot during my project and encourages me when I failed in my experiments. She supported me when I feel unwell during a crisis with the lab techs. He called my phone to calm me down and encouraged me to write my report perfectly. I owe her a lot with my life and got an A for her. For the first time in my life, I received so many compliments from her that "I've never met someone as hard-working as you and I really hope you can get an A".

No one will know how much I really respect her.

But I didn't mean to say it that way during that interview.

After this incident, I decided not to say anyone's name and to talk about it during an interview.

Human beings can be narrow-minded and just think what is on the cover, but we never understand what the content of the book is.

It's like my situation. I may be naive and too careless with my words, but I am a smart, efficient and diligent worker who can make your project successful.

I decided to go ahead and say, it's his loss not to have me, dummy.

* NB: 1.2k visits but 1 vote in favor? Seriously?!

I was graduating with my Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Illinois and was actively seeking employment. I already had three really good offers, including one from Dow Chemical which was my pick, when I got a call from Procter and Gamble in Cincinnati, OH. I never would have thought of applying there, but they had seen my resume and offered an interview at their International Division in Cincinnati.

I didn't feel like going, but decided it was a free trip, with meals and the possible excitement of working on international projects. I also liked bragging rights ("my sixth interview"). Then

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I was graduating with my Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Illinois and was actively seeking employment. I already had three really good offers, including one from Dow Chemical which was my pick, when I got a call from Procter and Gamble in Cincinnati, OH. I never would have thought of applying there, but they had seen my resume and offered an interview at their International Division in Cincinnati.

I didn't feel like going, but decided it was a free trip, with meals and the possible excitement of working on international projects. I also liked bragging rights ("my sixth interview"). So I went.

I was impressed by the resources invested in their R&D effort. Who would say that detergents and consumer products have that level of science? We went to the company cafeteria for lunch and I bought a large salad bowl (pretending I was eating healthy), with a good helping of thousand island dressing.

Within a minute, while trying to slice a tomato, my knife smashed into the side of the bowl. He turned to me and, yes, the entire contents landed on my lap and on the suit jacket.

Is there a better way to show that I am a total nerd, incapable of basic life skills?

I gave up the opportunity, but put up with the rest of the day trying to hide the stains on my suit.

I can tell you THAT was embarrassing. My biggest mistake.

But they still offered me a job. It was an exciting opportunity and they said they cover any night school class I wanted to take. Also, my girlfriend was in Indianapolis, 200 miles away.

I accepted the job. P&G was a great employer and I ended up on some exciting and challenging projects. All because I wanted a free lunch and despite my loss for the salad bowl.

You never know.

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