What is the biggest challenge the HR professional faces when dealing with management?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Sean Lane



What is the biggest challenge the HR professional faces when dealing with management?

When it says that it is about "management", it can be interpreted in two ways….

The first is when HR has a seat at the executive table. The most common problem that you will see here is between the CFO and the hiring manager. CFOs and CHROs are constantly arguing about how to allocate finances (as they should).

The CHRO may introduce a new wellness program for employees and the CFO will consider it a cost of doing business and will strongly oppose the creation of new programs because it does not produce more revenue for the company. The HR leader will then respond with d

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When it says that it is about "management", it can be interpreted in two ways….

The first is when HR has a seat at the executive table. The most common problem that you will see here is between the CFO and the hiring manager. CFOs and CHROs are constantly arguing about how to allocate finances (as they should).

The CHRO may introduce a new wellness program for employees and the CFO will consider it a cost of doing business and will strongly oppose the creation of new programs because it does not produce more revenue for the company. The HR leader will respond with data on how you save the company money by avoiding sick days. In this case, the most difficult thing is to create a business case for the other people on the leadership team using information that may not appear directly in any of the three main financial documents.

Other times, when HR doesn't have a seat at the table - and is seen simply as a management function - it becomes a problem of pride. Managers and revenue-generating departments like sales or engineering get a free pass. When there is a dispute between a manager and someone in HR, it is not about who is right and who is wrong, because management has a trump card.

Whenever they want, they simply say, “I have authority over you. So do what I tell you. "Or they just go up to the top and say," HR. It prevents me from doing my job and I should get away with it because I actually make money for the company. "

Most of the time, HR is just trying to comply with the law. What they are suggesting was never your idea in the first place. It's more a question of, do you want to follow the law and / or company policy or not? This is very often seen when hiring managers want to ignore background checks or prevent employees from completing paperwork when they return from giving birth or some other type of leave.

It is often true that HR prevents managers from performing in the best possible way, but not because that is their intention, it is only because it is the law to do things a certain way. Where HR falls short is not in enforcing company policies, but in not making recommendations on what to do. HR is too much of a "no, you can't do that department" and not enough of a "You should try this department instead."

Most bosses who are not in HR (and even some who have had and have had that experience) have no idea what HR is intended to do or why. They have been leading people for a while and they think they have the most answers. If a legal problem arises in them, they suddenly want HR and the attorneys we can call to get involved, but they still don't usually listen carefully. They just want the problem to go away, have someone else handle it, and save them time and worry. We do that, but at the same time we continually try to educate managers on what it means to manage people for maximum effectiveness.

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Most bosses who are not in HR (and even some who have had and have had that experience) have no idea what HR is intended to do or why. They have been leading people for a while and they think they have the most answers. If a legal problem arises in them, they suddenly want HR and the attorneys we can call to get involved, but they still don't usually listen carefully. They just want the problem to go away, have someone else handle it, and save them time and worry. We do that, but at the same time we continually try to educate managers on what it means to manage people for maximum effectiveness.

Bradley Russell gave a good answer for many HR folks, but those are the day-to-day frustrations rather than the underlying problem. Good leadership can make an organization 5-20 times more successful over many years (read Flight of the Buffalo or books like that). Only about 10% of managers are highly effective leaders and the rest cannot understand what HR is going on when we give advice to try to move them in that direction, so they ignore, sometimes oppose, circumvent, undermine , etc. a lot of what HR could do. Despite that, we keep moving forward and over many years I think we have made SOME breakthroughs along with the thousands of research projects, books, and articles from experts and professors on all of this. Stanford's Jeffrey Pfeffer coined the best title when he wrote a book called “The Know-Doing Gap. “We know what good people management should look like, so why doesn't everyone do it? He couldn't answer that and neither did I despite years of trying.

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