What is the best way to help job seekers?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Brenden Sellers



What is the best way to help job seekers?

I'm not sure how you are looking for work, but I would like to have some suggestions on how you would like to approach your job search. These can be very different from the advice you usually hear.

(As part of my work experience, I was involved in all aspects of hiring, including posting job postings, reviewing applications, interviewing, and deciding to hire.)

  1. Relax. No matter what your situation is, it is better to be relaxed rather than anxious, frantic, or even desperate. How? You need to believe that you will find the correct position. The reality is that there are positions to
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I'm not sure how you are looking for work, but I would like to have some suggestions on how you would like to approach your job search. These can be very different from the advice you usually hear.

(As part of my work experience, I was involved in all aspects of hiring, including posting job postings, reviewing applications, interviewing, and deciding to hire.)

  1. Relax. No matter what your situation is, it is better to be relaxed rather than anxious, frantic, or even desperate. How? You need to believe that you will find the correct position. The reality is that there are positions available to you and you can find one that is a good fit for you. You will put yourself in a much better position to find that job trusting that you will find it. (By the way, one way to be more relaxed is to give up the idea of ​​a "perfect" job. There is no such thing. You shouldn't be looking for that. Instead, you are taking a design approach to your life and that is finding the right one. best position for where you are now in your life).
  2. Take a self-assessment. Check with yourself to determine your interests and what type of work you want to do. Even if you are "sure" of what you want to do, just take a few minutes to think about it. You may even want to write down on a piece of paper what your interests are in terms of jobs or areas of work. But don't limit it to just "work-related" interests. What else excites you? This is a bit of brainstorming with yourself. You may end up with a short list of job titles, areas of interest, and areas of work. Why do this? Many times we look for jobs because we "have to" because of some expectation that we have chosen to place on ourselves. The expectation may come from your background, family, spouse, friends, or colleagues. The truth is that this is your choice. It is your life, and you should consider following what you want to do. This activity can help you verify if what you think you want to do is really what you want to do. By the way, if you think of a job, but you dismiss it because it is "impossible" or it would not be accepted by others, really verify that you want to dismiss the idea simply for these reasons. Again, this is your life and you want to live it in light of who you are and what you enjoy.
  3. Know their interests. Now that you have a few areas of interest, it's time to start the prototyping phase. This is simply an opportunity to test your interests. This is best done by meeting with people who are working in positions that interest you or who are working in the areas that interest you. Ideally, you should meet them in person. Invite them to meet you for coffee at a time that is convenient for them. If you can't meet in person, give them a call. The idea when you talk to them is to listen as you learn from them about what they do, what they like, what they don't like, what a typical day is like, how they ended up where they are, etc. You are not looking for a job. You are checking to see if these interests you identified are really interesting to you based on talking to people who are doing what you find interesting. How do you find these people? Look for them. Use your existing network to find people who know other people. Use something like LinkedIn to find people associated with people you know. Find people from your schools, even if they graduated a long time ago and contact them. (Many fellow alumni enjoy this opportunity to talk about themselves with a fellow alumnus.) Also, the people you meet with may meet other people you can meet with. Lastly, you can cold call a company and explain what you want to do. (Can work). When you communicate with a person, just explain your interest in your type of job or work area and ask for at least 30 minutes of their time. When you meet them, be prepared to ask open-ended questions that make them share so that you can learn. Of course, follow up with a thank you email or handwritten note. Keep doing this step with as many people as possible. As you learn more, you can change your interests or move in a different direction. Again, this is not about perfection, it is about finding a match of your interest and enthusiasm and position. follow up with a thank you email or handwritten note. Keep doing this step with as many people as possible. As you learn more, you can change your interests or move in a different direction. Again, this is not about perfection, it is about finding a match of your interest and enthusiasm and position. follow up with a thank you email or handwritten note. Keep doing this step with as many people as possible. As you learn more, you can change your interests or move in a different direction. Again, this is not about perfection, it is about finding a match of your interest and enthusiasm and position.
  4. If things really resonate with you and one person, you might ask, "How could someone like me find a way to work for a company like yours?" It is not aggressive to ask for a job. It is a reasonable question. Many times you will not need to ask. As you meet more and more people and find your match, offers will come in. That sounds too good to be true, but it happens because companies hire many more people than are listed in the jobs. And here you are showing interest and being on top of someone's mind.

That's it. I would suggest giving it a try. It is much more fruitful than sending dozens of resumes to the black holes of the application and waiting passively for answers that, in most cases, will not arrive. It is an active approach that takes control of your life and helps you pursue what you want. And works. Plus, when you do get the job, you're much more likely to be a good fit, since you've been looking for the position and doing your research. And it's something you can feel more confident in that matches your interest. Good luck!

Be sure to read the job description and meet the given criteria for experience and training. If you don't fit, don't apply OR you have a VERY good reason to explain why, despite not having certain qualifications, you are a very good fit for the position.

I take it for granted that you will prepare a well-designed resume and that someone with knowledge will check the grammar and spelling.

Learn all you can about the company. Some people advise that you hang out at the main workplace at the end of the day so that you can get an idea of ​​the appropriate style of

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Be sure to read the job description and meet the given criteria for experience and training. If you don't fit, don't apply OR you have a VERY good reason to explain why, despite not having certain qualifications, you are a very good fit for the position.

I take it for granted that you will prepare a well-designed resume and that someone with knowledge will check the grammar and spelling.

Learn all you can about the company. Some people advise that you hang out at the main workplace at the end of the day so that you can get a feel for the appropriate style of dress and the attitude of the workers when they leave.

On this subject, the usual advice is that you do not dress for the position you want now, but for the position a step above that.

Relearning what you can about the company ... find out what they do, what their history is, when they were founded, who founded them, who is now in charge, what are their policies, slogans and logo.

Review your website page by page. If they have a "media" page, read recent press releases. Know what your competition is. Are they a public company and, if so, how are their shares? Who are your superior officers? What problems, if any, is the company facing at this time?

Don't brag in the interview (s) about the research you've done unless they ask what you know about the organization. Sure, some of this information will be useless to you in terms of a job interview. However, excessive preparation is much better than entering the interview with no idea of ​​the corporate style. The familiarity you have developed will give you a "plus" if you are asked what you know about the organization or the position you are applying for, which is quite possible in an interview. It will probably make you feel more secure.

One last thing ... if you get an interview, AS SOON AS YOU GET HOME, write and mail a handwritten note or card thanking the lead person for the time they took in the interview and expressing your continued interest in the post. The thank you part is crucial. A professional employment consultant has told me about companies in which, when the final hiring decision is made, applications are divided into two groups: one for those who sent a thank you and one for those who did not. Guess what bunch they looked at in terms of "Who are we hiring?" Of course, yes, the ones who had sent the note. The others were not even considered.

Good luck with that.

This is not necessarily an exhaustive list, but here are some basics. This is primarily for professional jobs, but you can apply it to any level of work. I hope that helps:

  1. Have an up-to-date resume.
  2. Provide a personalized cover letter if possible.
  3. Be polite. Send a follow-up email 1-2 days after the interview. Call 2 to 3 days later. And don't call more than once every 3 days afterward and only 3 times in total: 4 if there was a lot of communication and interviews or sympathy and you really felt a connection; but distribute them for at least 3 days each. Give up after that until you hear from them.
  4. Sell ​​yourself. Sho
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This is not necessarily an exhaustive list, but here are some basics. This is primarily for professional jobs, but you can apply it to any level of work. I hope that helps:

  1. Have an up-to-date resume.
  2. Provide a personalized cover letter if possible.
  3. Be polite. Send a follow-up email 1-2 days after the interview. Call 2 to 3 days later. And don't call more than once every 3 days afterward and only 3 times in total: 4 if there was a lot of communication and interviews or sympathy and you really felt a connection; but distribute them for at least 3 days each. Give up after that until you hear from them.
  4. Sell ​​yourself. Show off your achievements. Talk about them. Be positive.
  5. Do not be shy. Don't be arrogant or obnoxious, but definitely don't be shy or nervous.
  6. Look a person in the eye when you speak to him, shake his hand confidently.
  7. Lead the audience. Even if you have to interview a team of people, you are in command. Do not be nervous. Again, not cocky, but safe.
  8. Study the position, the position and the company before the interview. Learn what you can about the company and its hiring managers.
  9. Dress well. Learn how the company dresses as a whole first if possible. And be at least one notch above that. That means if they wear jeans and t-shirts, you will at least be wearing jeans / dockers and a nice button-down shirt. If you wear business casual wear, then wear business pants, button-down / tie / coat, or even better a full suit. Just stay 1-2 levels above what is the company norm for your interviews.
  10. Don't badmouth previous employers. Even if you had a bad situation, find a way to be honest but to put a positive spin on the outcome.
  11. Show interest. Show that you have learned about the company, that you have read about what they do, that you are ready to be what they need.

If you have any question, do not doubt in asking.

What advice would you give someone who is looking for work?

There is so much that could be written here because every job search is different in a few key ways:

Target role

  • Differences. The type of search a CEO does is quite different from what a large store manager does. A CEO is likely to be more likely to move to a new position; A store manager is likely to be much less likely to move. Compensation negotiations for the CEO will likely focus on acquiring stock options, the golden parachute, and some details of the employment contract. Compensation outside of the boardroom tends to focus on salary.
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What advice would you give someone who is looking for work?

There is so much that could be written here because every job search is different in a few key ways:

Target role

  • Differences. The type of search a CEO does is quite different from what a large store manager does. A CEO is likely to be more likely to move to a new position; A store manager is likely to be much less likely to move. Compensation negotiations for the CEO will likely focus on acquiring stock options, the golden parachute, and some details of the employment contract. Compensation outside of the boardroom tends to focus on salary and benefits.
  • Similarities. They both want to use previous experience and results to translate into a new role. The desired industry generally remains the same, or if it changes, it is generally a related one. Candidates looking for a career reinvention will struggle, unless their skill set is deemed highly transferable, and many are not.

Moment

  • Differences. Most job seekers begin a job search because of a decision made by their employer, rather than a decision they make themselves. This means that, depending on your finances and the circumstances of the separation, the timing may be urgent. Those job seekers who are in charge of the timing of their search, however, can afford to be selective about their next opportunity, make sure their resumes are up to scratch, etc.
  • Similarities. No matter the urgency, a calm and thoughtful process is necessary when considering the next career steps. If the objective role is not clear, that clarity should be achieved as soon as possible. Otherwise, the resume, elevator pitch, and LinkedIn profile won't match what you're looking for.

But above all, learn about the job search process. These blogs are excellent and I have been a fan for years:

  • CareerSherpa 1
  • CareerTrend 2
  • Finished races Write 3

Footnotes

1 Hannah Morgan aka Career Sherpa | Job Search, Career & Social Strategist 2 Executive Resume Writing 3 Advance Your Career Today Careers Completed Writing Makes Your Achievements Stand Out | Finished races Write

It depends. According to the TYPE of work or profession in which you are.

My suggestions are ONLY, if you were NOT DISMISSED, just to be clear.

In general, if you're in an "OFFICE" type of job, or you're an engineer who just got a better offer, via networking, here are some things to check off your exit checklist:

  • Give early notice - Depends on your employer's requirements. Sometimes 2 weeks is enough, sometimes 4 weeks, or sometimes you may have to wait longer to find a replacement.
  • Be sure to walk over a COPY of your Notice to Human Resources + Safety Office + Motor Pool, for obvious reasons.
  • Has written COP
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It depends. According to the TYPE of work or profession in which you are.

My suggestions are ONLY, if you were NOT DISMISSED, just to be clear.

In general, if you're in an "OFFICE" type of job, or you're an engineer who just got a better offer, via networking, here are some things to check off your exit checklist:

  • Give early notice - Depends on your employer's requirements. Sometimes 2 weeks is enough, sometimes 4 weeks, or sometimes you may have to wait longer to find a replacement.
  • Be sure to walk over a COPY of your Notice to Human Resources + Safety Office + Motor Pool, for obvious reasons.
  • Have written COPIES of Letters of recommendation from your Manager or Supervisor and any Awards or Special Certificates.
  • Make sure all work-related tasks have been or will be completed BEFORE your actual departure day. This will prevent your Manager or Supervisor from sending a nasty Employee Addendum to your next employer.
  • Just 1 Gift - Leave a small wrapped gift (ballpoint pen or stress ball, etc.) on your old desk, for the next person to fill it. This is a touch of class and your last act that will be noticed by EVERYONE else, including those of your manager or supervisor.
  • WHY? I assume you have already “thought through” the fact that in your new job, unless you have obtained the position of manager or supervisor; It will be at the bottom of the hierarchy, which means that in any future job cuts, it will be the first to go.
  • Leaving a smaller POSITION, but with good salary and benefits, and then cut from the New one, you may return to your previous job, but at least for TEMP. On the other hand, if you left without warning and just left everything messy and untidy, you won't walk through the door.
  • Always remember KARMA ... it works in BOTH senses.

Job hunting can be tough work. For me it's not just about finding a job. It's about finding the right job, a job that is great for me now and for the future, either as a stepping stone to your career or as an opportunity that I will feel comfortable with in the long run.

It must be recognized that I can use my strengths and ideally work on them.

As we typically spend more time working than with our partner, I am personally very picky about my job searches.

Therefore, what would you advise to find a job that you like to go to work on Monday morning and not only see it as an annoying duty?

Also if

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Job hunting can be tough work. For me it's not just about finding a job. It's about finding the right job, a job that is great for me now and for the future, either as a stepping stone to your career or as an opportunity that I will feel comfortable with in the long run.

It must be recognized that I can use my strengths and ideally work on them.

As we typically spend more time working than with our partner, I am personally very picky about my job searches.

Therefore, what would you advise to find a job that you like to go to work on Monday morning and not only see it as an annoying duty?

Also, if some of you have the conflicting opinion that a job doesn't have to be fun or special, but just a job (period), I'm happy to hear your thoughts on it.

Dream in. It is a little love that you are with the situation; that's why they pay you.

The worst thing people can do at work is nothing. Volunteer, learn a skill, any skill, take a class, anything. People who say they love their job are usually: 1. Full of shit and 2. In all honesty, they are not doing anything extraordinary / creative / innovative / whatever. Working is a journey and trying to make a good situation, like everything else. Occasionally there are moments of significance: someone recognizes you. You see something different. Management buys you lunch and does not force you to eat it in front of

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Dream in. It is a little love that you are with the situation; that's why they pay you.

The worst thing people can do at work is nothing. Volunteer, learn a skill, any skill, take a class, anything. People who say they love their job are usually: 1. Full of shit and 2. In all honesty, they are not doing anything extraordinary / creative / innovative / whatever. Working is a journey and trying to make a good situation, like everything else. Occasionally there are moments of significance: someone recognizes you. You see something different. The management buys you lunch and does not force you to eat it in front of them (ha ha) as long as you behave in the best way. A coworker makes you laugh in a real way.

For the most part, it may not be all of that.

Go find a different job if you feel miserable. Your misery will completely consume your lunch and make everyone around you miserable, to one degree or another. Also, get as much as you can from the job you have before you leave. Learn as much as possible, do all the shitty jobs, and gain more character. When looking for a different job, you will bring a ton of significant experience that will set you apart from other applicants.

As a 23-year-old entrepreneur, DO NOT BE DISCOURAGED. Believe me, I have missed so many different opportunities in life because I tried and failed. In school they teach you that failure is not an option and all that nonsense. If you FAIL, go back up and try again from a different angle. Steve Jobs dropped out of college to pursue his passion and founded one of the greatest tech companies of all time. Apple. Enough talk.

Check job websites on the Internet frequently, at least once a week. I think the job search | In fact, it is one of the best websites to use because their site lists vacancies found on many other websites.

Always include a cover letter with your resumes. Don't send the same resume to every job you apply for. Customize your resumes to apply to the particular job you are applying for. For example, if you are applying for a clerical job, emphasize all of your clerical experiences in your cover letter and resume. Try to limit your cover letter to one page and your resume to 2-3 pages

Keep reading

Check job websites on the Internet frequently, at least once a week. I think the job search | In fact, it is one of the best websites to use because their site lists vacancies found on many other websites.

Always include a cover letter with your resumes. Don't send the same resume to every job you apply for. Customize your resumes to apply to the particular job you are applying for. For example, if you are applying for a clerical job, emphasize all of your clerical experiences in your cover letter and resume. Try to limit your cover letter to one page and your resume to 2-3 pages.

Expect emotional ups and downs and don't let them slow you down. Whenever you get a call or an interview, your heart races. When things don't work out, you break down and despair. Just know that's what every job seeker goes through and that you only need ONE job ... and it will come. One person in six leaves an open job each year. Organizations MUST cover those places (except in big downturns / recessions) to stay in business. They can fill a lot internally, but that leaves another opening ... so they still need that external injection of people to survive. They HAVE to hire. And only you

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Expect emotional ups and downs and don't let them slow you down. Whenever you get a call or an interview, your heart races. When things don't work out, you break down and despair. Just know that's what every job seeker goes through and that you only need ONE job ... and it will come. One person in six leaves an open job each year. Organizations MUST cover those places (except in big downturns / recessions) to stay in business. They can fill a lot internally, but that leaves another opening ... so they still need that external injection of people to survive. They HAVE to hire. And you just have to find a person who needs someone like you right now. That's why networking works better than answering job postings. It is immediate. You're talking directly to people and you will stumble upon someone who needs a person right now instead of chasing ads through resumes that sit on desks and not look at each other for days or weeks. Learn to Network: Lots of Tips Online and in Libraries.

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