What is the best way to apply for a job?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Scarlett Hussain



What is the best way to apply for a job?

Here are my humble suggestions. Feel free to correct it if necessary:

a) Submit your full resume / profile on major job search sites. It works. Fill out your resume with keywords relevant to the industry you want to work in. This will help you receive emails / calls from companies looking to hire people with similar skills to yours.

b) LinkedIn: a lot of people supervise this tool, but I think it is very useful. Follow the companies of your interest. If they are going to have an opening that interests you, you can always see the name and LinkedIn profile of the person who publishes.

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Here are my humble suggestions. Feel free to correct it if necessary:

a) Submit your full resume / profile on major job search sites. It works. Fill out your resume with keywords relevant to the industry you want to work in. This will help you receive emails / calls from companies looking to hire people with similar skills to yours.

b) LinkedIn: a lot of people supervise this tool, but I think it is very useful. Follow the companies of your interest. If they are going to have a vacancy that interests you, you can always see the name and LinkedIn profile of the person who posted that job opening. No, do not submit your application there yet.

Google that person in and out. You will most likely find that person's official email id. In case you can't get the magic string, please add it on LinkedIn. Obvious, right?

Now, write a suitable and personalized cover letter. Attach your resume and mail it to that person. Yes, don't be a miser with 'Thank you', 'Regards', etc. :)

c) Follow some blogs, websites, discussion forums related to your interests. Many startups and companies post their vacancies on these forums. Again, once you hear about an interesting opening, I suggest you find out the human resources of that company. We live in the age of the Internet. It can't be that hard, right? Once found, go back to the last two lines of the previous point.

The above three points might help, in addition to your network of friends, seniors, and that uncle Sharma who works at an Unfortunate 500 company;)

I think in this case you should meet with your college career service and ask them. Most likely, a graduated milk round type opening is your best option.

You also need to do more introspection about what this "role" you will be doing. At the moment you are very lazy. 70% of a job search is finding what you want and with whom and 25% finding the right people and learning the right things / building relationships and 5% interviewing

Let your friends and contacts know that you are looking for a job change. Trust me, they can help you a lot. And they tell you honest things about the company you are joining. Identify the opportunity and send them through your CV, you will be referred and being referred increases your chances sometimes.

Also do a little search for vacancies on blogs, websites, and some portals yourself. You should also follow the following.

The largest professional network in the world --- Linkedin gives you job updates in various organizations and also informs you of the connection there.

Glassdoor: A Look Inside

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Let your friends and contacts know that you are looking for a job change. Trust me, they can help you a lot. And they tell you honest things about the company you are joining. Identify the opportunity and send them through your CV, you will be referred and being referred increases your chances sometimes.

Also do a little search for vacancies on blogs, websites, and some portals yourself. You should also follow the following.

The largest professional network in the world --- Linkedin gives you job updates in various organizations and also informs you of the connection there.

Glassdoor - An Inside Look at Jobs and Companies --- Here you can see the ins and outs of employers with employee reviews and comments, job openings, and even the type of salary paid there.

Then there are the traditional ways of uploading / updating resumes on job search portals: Naukri.com - Jobs - Jobs in India - Recruitment - Job Search - Employment - Job Offers, Search Jobs. Build a better career. Find your vocation. etc.

Good luck!!

What is the best way to get the job you are applying for?

You should have sufficient training and hopefully experience for that position.

Create a good resume. Don't make it too long or wordy.

A cover letter can explain why you want that job and how it will be a good fit for you.

Check what you write. No one's perfect, but I edited the question and the mistake you made makes it look sloppy (let alone, if I may say so, uneducated).

Best wishes.

Unfortunately, your scenario is very common. Underpaid, overworked, and then eliminated. I'm sorry that you had to go through this experience.

In your situation, I would suggest saying something like, “I felt like I had reached a point where I was no longer growing or learning in my role. I tried to work with my manager to find a more suitable role in the company, but to no avail. So I started looking for new opportunities. "

This type of response focuses on your desire to advance in your career. The employer looking to hire you will like you to have a drive for self-improvement.

Don'

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Unfortunately, your scenario is very common. Underpaid, overworked, and then eliminated. I'm sorry that you had to go through this experience.

In your situation, I would suggest saying something like, “I felt like I had reached a point where I was no longer growing or learning in my role. I tried to work with my manager to find a more suitable role in the company, but to no avail. So I started looking for new opportunities. "

This type of response focuses on your desire to advance in your career. The employer looking to hire you will like you to have a drive for self-improvement.

Don't badmouth your previous employer saying you felt underpaid and overworked and definitely don't mention how you felt as if your firing was a political move. In fact, you don't even need to mention that you were fired unless the topic “under what circumstances did you leave the company?” Comes up.

Here is a list of other common acceptable reasons that employers will accept:

  • I am looking for a job that is closer to home to shorten my travel time. (Use it only if relevant and applicable).
  • I am not challenged enough in my current position, so I look for an opportunity where I can continue to learn and grow. (This is the one I suggested to you).
  • There have been changes in leadership and the direction my team is headed. It is no longer going in a direction that makes sense for my career, so I look for opportunities that are more aligned with my goals. (This might work for you too)
  • There has been a restructuring in the company and my team will be affected. (This is a professional way of saying that I was fired, but it was completely out of my control and not because of my performance)
  • I want to work for a company in a different industry.
  • I want to work with a company with a different business culture.
  • I want to work for a company of a different size.
  • There have been changes in the overall vision and goals of the company, so I want to join a company with a vision that I can support and work on better. (This is a professional way of subtly saying that there was a culture clash between the company and me. If you use this reason, be prepared to explain what about the culture was not a good fit.)

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any more questions.

The first piece of advice I have given to hundreds of job seekers (and I haven't taken enough) is to narrow down your choice so that you are applying for ONE job. Recruiters fear hiring anyone who says or suggests, "I'll take anything." To them, it means you don't care, you aren't focused, you don't have a specialty (so you're probably not 'really good' at just one thing). You're much, much more likely to get job offers if you just ask for one thing.

IRONICALLY, when I was asking for just one thing, I got more offers, but hardly any of them were the only thing I was asking for. P

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The first piece of advice I have given to hundreds of job seekers (and I haven't taken enough) is to narrow down your choice so that you are applying for ONE job. Recruiters fear hiring anyone who says or suggests, "I'll take anything." To them, it means you don't care, you aren't focused, you don't have a specialty (so you're probably not 'really good' at just one thing). You're much, much more likely to get job offers if you just ask for one thing.

IRONICALLY, when I was asking for just one thing, I got more offers, but hardly any of them were the only thing I was asking for. People love to think, well, if he can do this, maybe he can do X (kind of like what he said). Specifically, I wanted to be a consultant or manager in human resources in general, more specifically in solving problems of the labor relations type (and I could see that that extends to a broader organizational problem solving, all actually the same). Because I had been a math teacher at one point before working in labor relations, my main skill, many people offered me jobs in HR compensation planning, which are crunchy numbers and almost nothing to do with my abilities to convince people in difficult situations. situations to agree on solutions.

That was good. It was still flattering. Those were jobs that I knew I could do, but at the time (for once in my life) I was really focused on these kinds of things that I wanted to do and I finally got it ... and it led to a fabulous career series. steps that I continued to enjoy because I had reduced myself to the only mainstream I wanted: solving people's work problems.

The problem, when you start over, is that it is completely impossible to know exactly what ONE is. So you just have to pick ONE that you THINK might be the ONE and go after him. When people really offer you something something different, you can consider those things and you can take one that looks pretty good to you. After all, when you're just starting out, it's hard to expect ONE thing because you can't claim experience at it, so you take what seems best, BUT the principle is the same, tell them you are focused, you are far more attractive to recruiters. . Try to list all the ways you've paid attention, read, talked to people, even tried some of that in your previous part-time jobs or sports functions or whatever.

People realize how excited you are about ONE thing. So, as they say, "fake it until you make it." You are not inventing it, it is ONE of the things that interest you or that may interest you, but it is much more attractive for them to think that it is only one. Interestingly, I discovered it again when I retired and wanted to consult. By then I was able to consult in many areas of HR and business, having spent years expanding my knowledge as an executive. But people didn't want to hire a 'general human resources consultant' as much as they would have wanted 'just a job consultant' or 'just a policy writing consultant' or 'just a compensation consultant'. They didn't buy my claim that I could be good at all of those and more by then. Fortunately, I didn't need to work that badly, so I remained a general and was rarely hired. I could pay it by then

"Discouraged workers" who have stopped looking for work have been removed from the unemployment statistics, and Wall Street has largely ignored that fact.

You stop looking for work if you live in a rural area and WalMart has moved in and destroyed the entire local Main Street retail industry.

You stop looking for work if you are over 50 and employers fear that you will overload their health insurance program.

You stop looking for work if your most recent position was paying well and your new position is going to be a step down.

You stop looking for work if you have a good amount of cash.

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"Discouraged workers" who have stopped looking for work have been removed from the unemployment statistics, and Wall Street has largely ignored that fact.

You stop looking for work if you live in a rural area and WalMart has moved in and destroyed the entire local Main Street retail industry.

You stop looking for work if you are over 50 and employers fear that you will overload their health insurance program.

You stop looking for work if your most recent position was paying well and your new position is going to be a step down.

You stop looking for work if you have a good amount of money saved and you have optimistic hopes about the stock market.

You stop looking for work if you have to take care of an elderly relative.

You stop looking for work if you want to avoid the tax liability because you don't want to finance the military-industrial-security-congressional-media-lobbyists-bankers complex.

You stop looking for work because you realize that if you can live frugally, you have it done in the shade.

You stop looking for work because what you are doing outside of the paid world of work as an activist or volunteer is much, much, much more important than working for a profit-seeking idiot in the cash economy.

Currently I am also 19 years old.

The best way to apply for a job is to give a value proposition.

Instead of blindly applying for jobs through job boards, go to the company's website and try to find out what would improve on their website and actually do it.

If you are a web developer looking for work, I would go to the website of the company you really want to work for and choose parts of the website that need improvement and develop a list of 3 problems that you find.

Then I would work on those 3 problems and send them to the boss.

That's just one way to do it.

Nina created a specific landing page that included

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Currently I am also 19 years old.

The best way to apply for a job is to give a value proposition.

Instead of blindly applying for jobs through job boards, go to the company's website and try to find out what would improve on their website and actually do it.

If you are a web developer looking for work, I would go to the website of the company you really want to work for and choose parts of the website that need improvement and develop a list of 3 problems that you find.

Then I would work on those 3 problems and send them to the boss.

That's just one way to do it.

Nina made a specific landing page that included her value proposition. The website is straightforward and offers Airbnb a lot of value.

The difference between her and the rest of the applicants is that it was very evident that she submitted her application to Airbnb. The rest of the applicants were probably generic resumes combined with generic cover letters.

If you are looking for something more basic, the same principle can be applied. If you really want to work at Starbucks, I'd buy an apron at random and start taking out the trash and cleaning the store. The shift leader will probably be very surprised and tell the store manager that you were helping the store.

Bam. Hired on the spot.

The key to getting your foot in the door is always finding a way to deliver value. People are very concerned about what a company can do for them.

Reverse that thought and you will be very successful.


Sometimes I blog.

If you asked this question, I am praying and hoping that you know what you are doing: coming down the mountain and trying to feel and look stylish about it.

There is only one form in my journal / employment history.

I faked my CV and resumed it. Under "work experience". Lower the tone of your achievements, particularly those that will be a clear indication that you know more than you seem and that you could be lying or that you are running away or trying to avoid something or someone.

Look at the job description carefully. You must first go back to the "correct" industry you came from

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If you asked this question, I am praying and hoping that you know what you are doing: coming down the mountain and trying to feel and look stylish about it.

There is only one form in my journal / employment history.

I faked my CV and resumed it. Under "work experience". Lower the tone of your achievements, particularly those that will be a clear indication that you know more than you seem and that you could be lying or that you are running away or trying to avoid something or someone.

Look at the job description carefully. You must first go back to the "correct" industry you came from. Most companies want a problem solved. So if you are overqualified, it means you get by. You conceptualize and are good at giving instructions to solve the problem. If you show that talent, you are very OVERQUALIFIED.

But if you opt for a lower and perhaps non-managerial position, focus on the technical knowledge of how to solve the problem and emphasize your ability to work and work with everyone (interpersonal skills).

Remember that salary, workload, working hours, and power of authority will be different. You have to work really hard to NOT be irritated or frustrated to slowly integrate into work.

Good luck.

Not only is it okay, it is recommended.

First, just submitting an application doesn't even guarantee an interview.

Second, most companies will interview multiple candidates for a position. So even if you are interviewed, you have a 10% chance of getting hired, if they interview 10 candidates.

  • Also, if you can interview more than one person, why can't you interview more than one employer?

Third, if you ignore a position because you applied elsewhere, that position may be gone by the time you discover that you were not selected for the one you applied for.

Four, and never forget this: you are interviewing them as much as

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Not only is it okay, it is recommended.

First, just submitting an application doesn't even guarantee an interview.

Second, most companies will interview multiple candidates for a position. So even if you are interviewed, you have a 10% chance of getting hired, if they interview 10 candidates.

  • Also, if you can interview more than one person, why can't you interview more than one employer?

Third, if you ignore a position because you applied elsewhere, that position may be gone by the time you discover that you were not selected for the one you applied for.

Four, and never forget this: you are interviewing them as much as they interview you. Unless you are desperate, look for red flags that may imply that you have a toxic culture or that you may be in trouble.

Note: When I accepted a position with my current employer, I had 2 extended offers on the same day. It is a wonderful position to be in. The options are always good.

Immediately. What are you waiting for?

Seriously, what would you expect?

I can write pages and pages of theories (based on my 20 years of recruiting) about how it is advantageous to apply early ... or late ... or in the middle of the interview process, but you really don't know if that job It will be open for a day or a year. So if you delay your request based on one of those theories…. the job could disappear completely.

Apply now. See what happens.

If you have the corresponding VISA to stay abroad, you can apply for companies that are recruiting simply by using Google. Obtaining the VISA is the great obstacle that most people do not obtain and companies are not willing to finance their VISA, since it is an additional cost on their investment when hiring it.

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