What is the best thing you have done in a job interview?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Renata Hyde



What is the best thing you have done in a job interview?

I would like to answer on behalf of a student that I am still so proud of. As a volunteer, I taught life skills at a homeless shelter with a mental health diagnosis. Usually they were schizoid, bipolar, full of anxiety, etc. With medicines and counseling they can work if they can find a job. We did role-playing games, especially in an interview to answer the question "Tell me about yourself."

Students were encouraged to create a 30-second script about where they had worked, why they wanted to change jobs, and how they could help the interviewing company. Success was rare, but a

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I would like to answer on behalf of a student that I am still so proud of. As a volunteer, I taught life skills at a homeless shelter with a mental health diagnosis. Usually they were schizoid, bipolar, full of anxiety, etc. With medicines and counseling they can work if they can find a job. We did role-playing games, especially in an interview to answer the question "Tell me about yourself."

Students were encouraged to create a 30-second script about where they had worked, why they wanted to change jobs, and how they could help the interviewing company. Success was rare, but it was a wild celebration when someone got a job. This student walked into class yelling "I got a job!" I asked him to tell the class exactly what happened. He said he was excited to be asked to come in for an interview, but began to develop severe anxiety as the date approached. He said he was almost shaking when he anxiously sat down for the interview. Then he listened to “Tell me about you”, something we had repeatedly rehearsed. She said she felt a warm sense of relaxation flow through her body as she thought, “Hey, I know this, we HAVE this!

What is the best thing you have done in a job interview?

I received an offer. I mean, isn't that the only result that matters?

I mean, I'm a recruiter, so if I don't know how to interview well, I'm a mess at my job.

It's pretty straightforward - prove you're the best option available by showing that your skills are strong, that your past success record is the most useful, and that you'll do the job better than any alternative they're talking to. the compensation that is available and the way they want it done.

The scariest experience of my life. Apologies for TMI but it is necessary.

Few people in my life know about this experience and those who have no idea how much it affected me. The only one who understands is my partner, since he was by my side throughout the ordeal.

So I am a relatively young and healthy woman. One day I go out for coffee with my best friend and I start to have these pains in the lower part of my stomach. I told my friend about them and she says, "It's probably just your period."

It wasn't due, but it had appeared prematurely. Something that never

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The scariest experience of my life. Apologies for TMI but it is necessary.

Few people in my life know about this experience and those who have no idea how much it affected me. The only one who understands is my partner, since he was by my side throughout the ordeal.

So I am a relatively young and healthy woman. One day I go out for coffee with my best friend and I start to have these pains in the lower part of my stomach. I told my friend about them and she says, "It's probably just your period."

It wasn't due, but it had appeared prematurely. Something that never happened to me. Usually every 4 weeks without fail. Well, this was very painful. The partners will know, sometimes you just have random periods of really horrible cramps. I just attributed it to that, even though I took painkillers for 4 days due to the pain. It ended and the pain lessened, or so I thought.

A week or two later, I started to feel a dull throbbing pain right in the lower part of my stomach. I felt weird. There was no reason for it.

This lasted for about a week and gradually got worse. I noticed the pain getting more intense and then bleeding a little. It was not like a normal stain, this blood was watery and darker in color.

I started googling, of course. I worked myself in a correct state. I booked an appointment with the doctor, but couldn't get one for about 2 weeks. I started to get very anxious imagining that something serious was going on there.

So now we are 4 weeks from my period. It hurts a lot when I try to go to the bathroom. I limit drinking water because it hurts a lot to urinate. Same thing, pain, then bleeding, but it was getting heavier and I was panicking too. My partner was really worried at this point, he had never seen me like this before.

So he's got a boys' night planned. He has gone out to buy a new shirt and my best friend calls me. He told me that he would stay if he wanted to, but I told him to leave, I had the doctors the next day so that nothing would change until then. I said "go have fun but keep your phone on"

At this stage, the pain was about 6 out of 10. I was incredibly tired and needed to urinate again. My thigh was sore at the moment. I called my best friend crying thinking he might have something very sinister. She calmed me down a bit. I got up to urinate again and made it to my hallway, then passed out for a few seconds and fell. I couldn't get up.

My friend ran home and called my partner on the way. He arrived a few minutes after her. I was a total mess. I lay on the ground. My partner took me directly to the emergency department.

I kept letting out screams, the pain was immense at this point. I feel like my uterus is about to burst and my leg has been stabbed. It radiates through me like hell fire. I wait more than 2 hours before I see a doctor. The first thing she did was a pregnancy test. It was positive.

"Impossible" I said. I had a period 4 weeks ago and have not had sex for the entire month. She said "you definitely are, I'm sending you to the early pregnancy unit"

So I left. I looked at my partner and said, "Do you think it's going to be okay?"

He shook his head, "I'm sorry, but I don't think that's the case, this pain and bleeding is not normal."

I knew myself, but I was still hopeful.

I went and got scanned.

"There is your little baby, it is not very clear, but if you look here you will see it"

I told him that I had a son and that I had never felt such pain during pregnancy with him. She said have faith and that everything would be fine. I asked for an explanation for the pain. She said there was only 'discomfort' and that the bleeding was 'stained'

I left feeling positive. After all, she was the expert. He gave me an appointment for two days. My partner was not happy, we argued. I told him that he was being nasty saying that the baby was not going to be okay. He said: “I'm scared of getting our hopes up, I think we have to be realistic here. This pain is not a good sign "

I huffed and went to bed, only to be woken up by that leg pain again. I lay awake imagining what would happen. I was still consumed by an overwhelming sense of dread. It was really scary.

I went up again, the day before my appointment. I had a male midwife. His English was not very good. He scanned me and said "baby will be fine, don't panic" and sent me home.

The next day I went to my appointment. At this stage, my partner took me to the other side of the hall because I was screaming in pain. The first midwife I saw was on duty and did another scan that was incredibly painful. His answer was still the same. Everything looks good, although I can't see much there. He did a blood test to check my HCG levels and told me to wait a couple of hours. I came back after an hour, the pain was too much. He could barely speak at this point. I just cried and cried. My partner demanded that I see a consultant because he was unhappy with my treatment. It felt like no one was listening. He went to reception and there was a doctor there. He told her what was happening and she came right away. She scanned me and within 20 seconds she said to the midwife, "What did you say to this patient?"

She replied, "I told him everything would be fine and to calm down."

Doctor: “I can't understand how you came to that conclusion. Put red dots on this girl now "

My grip on my partner's hand tightened and I saw the expression on his face. I will never forget that look.

The consultant took my other hand and said, “I'm very sorry. Your baby won't make it. You are having an ectopic pregnancy. The baby has developed in your fallopian tube, which has burst and you are bleeding internally in your stomach. "

"But but, she said, she said it was fine"

"She was wrong. You have to go right now for emergency surgery."

I was stunned. Everything was blurry after that, I had to sign some forms. The anesthetist came and explained what was going on, but I couldn't even hear. I kept thinking that the doctor had made a mistake.

I went to the theater and when I woke up the physical pain was gone and I was high as a kite. They took me into the living room and my mother, my sister and my partner were waiting. Mom and my sister left, but my partner stayed with me until we said goodbye. We barely spoke, he just took me by the hand.

The doctor came to tell me what had happened. They took out the tube and stopped the bleeding. The baby was gone. Our baby was gone.

The pain from that was worse than the weeks of physical pain I'd endured.

When I was leaving the hospital a couple of days later, that midwife was there. She told me, "I hope we see each other again soon, you know that everything happens for a reason."

She worked in the early pregnancy issues unit, so I thought her comment was very insensitive. After all, I almost died because she missed the obvious. If that doctor hadn't come to check on me, they probably would have sent me home again.

The baby was only 7 weeks old. I asked my GP how it was possible when id had a period 4/5 weeks earlier. She said id suffered a miscarriage. That it hadn't been a period, and in hindsight it had been too heavy and painful to be a "normal period," so it all made sense. I had been pregnant with two at the time, but they were different stages. A miscarriage, then an ectopic one.

It really screwed me up. I felt like I had done something really bad to deserve this. I'm over that feeling.

However, I have my beautiful 8 year old son and he really is the best boy ever (I admit I am biased!) And I am thankful every day that I have been blessed with him.

That really was the scariest thing I've ever been and I'll never forget the feeling or the two little angels that didn't make it.

Here are some amazing tips from Life Pro:

  • Do what your partner puts off.
  • If you get caught in a thunderstorm outside and notice that your jewelry is starting to buzz or that your hair is standing on end, flee the area immediately as the lighting plans to light up where you are standing.
  • As an adult, revisit the old video games you played when you were just a kid. You'll get a whole new experience, noticing things you've never noticed before, at the same time getting a good dose of nostalgia.
  • Sort your email by searching for the word "Unsubscribe" in the message
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Here are some amazing tips from Life Pro:

  • Do what your partner puts off.
  • If you get caught in a thunderstorm outside and notice that your jewelry is starting to buzz or that your hair is standing on end, flee the area immediately as the lighting plans to light up where you are standing.
  • As an adult, revisit the old video games you played when you were just a kid. You'll get a whole new experience, noticing things you've never noticed before, at the same time getting a good dose of nostalgia.
  • Sort your email by searching for the word "Unsubscribe" in the body of the message.
  • If someone shows you something they are proud of on a topic that you don't really care about, just express how happy you are that they are happy.
  • If someone passes away and you found out before most of your friends or family, don't post it on social media right away. No one should find out on Facebook that someone was closed to death.
  • Create an email filter so that an email with the word "unsubscribe" is moved to a folder to delete all marketing emails in your inbox.
  • With summer just around the corner: When walking your dogs, put your hand on the pavement for seven seconds. If it's a struggle to hold down, it's too hot for your dog.
  • Don't turn around and go home after your dog has done his duty.
  • When checking into a hotel, immediately place your bags in the bathtub and inspect the room for bed bugs. This will prevent you from carrying something in your luggage in case you find it, since the bathtub is the least likely place to find bed bugs.
  • When driving on congested streets, occasionally check the taillights two or three cars in front of you. It will give you more time to react to harsh braking and will help prevent the fenders from buckling.
  • Whenever you call customer service, no matter how bad the company screwed you up or how angry you are, tell the service representative that you are not mad at him.
  • In a discussion (or debate) if someone claims that you said something before that you are pretty sure you did not say, respond with: "I don't remember saying that, but if I did, I retract that statement because it is not how I feel. " Then restate your argument clearly and concisely.
  • If you have trouble forgiving yourself for something, imagine someone you admire and respect doing the same thing as you (it could be a celebrity, a fictional character, or a person in your life).
  • If you are stuck in the elevator, call the Fire Department, not building management / maintenance.
  • If you need to calculate the monthly cost of weekly payments, multiply by 4,345, don't fall for the 4-week month trap.
  • Do you want to check if they follow you? Cross the street twice.
  • Never tease a sleeping person, not even harmless ones. After suddenly waking up, our brain is in total survival mode for a few seconds, which could lead to an accident at any moment.
  • For all dog owners: If you comb your dog's winter coat, leave it outside, do not throw it away. Some birds that build their nests now will be very happy to use the fur to make the nest fluffier and cozier.
  • Never badmouth your boss in front of an employee, no matter how close they are to you. It can bite you again.
  • Learn to speak in public, even if you never have to. Trim the fat of what you have to say and rehearse. So you don't stumble over your words.
  • Never trust your future memory.
  • If a jar is impossible to open. Gently tap part of the lid on the edge of your kitchen bench. It will warp the cap enough to break the vacuum seal and allow for easy opening.
  • The complexity of a problem is often hidden until you start working on a solution.
  • Record more videos of your children with their grandparents.
  • You may not like being in photos or taking them, but you will hate not having photos from some period of time when you are older. Take pictures even if you are out of your comfort zone from time to time, for your future self.
  • Getting angry at people for making mistakes doesn't teach them not to make mistakes, it teaches them to hide their mistakes.
  • Walking 3 miles will burn more calories than running 1 mile. It's easier to walk 3 miles while including in a podcast, music, audiobook, etc.
  • When looking at potential homes, in the basement look at the door hinges. If the one below is different or newer, the basement may have a history of flooding that even the real estate agent may be unaware of.
  • Don't say anything bad about your boss to your coworkers; even if they agree with you. You never know if someone would stab you in the back and let your boss know.

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In Norway we have a multi-million dollar hotel chain called Petter Stordalen.

When he was in his early twenties, he had just finished business school. Somehow he got an interview to be the first CEO of a new large shopping center in Trondheim, one of the largest cities in Norway.

He was in Trondheim early for the interview and took a walk around town. He started talking to an older man, who asked him what he was doing in Trondheim. He answered confidently that he was going to be the new CEO of the city's new shopping center.

When he finally got to the interview, it was with a group of stiff old buses.

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In Norway we have a multi-million dollar hotel chain called Petter Stordalen.

When he was in his early twenties, he had just finished business school. Somehow he got an interview to be the first CEO of a new large shopping center in Trondheim, one of the largest cities in Norway.

He was in Trondheim early for the interview and took a walk around town. He started talking to an older man, who asked him what he was doing in Trondheim. He answered confidently that he was going to be the new CEO of the city's new shopping center.

When he finally got to the interview, it was with a group of stiff old businessmen. In the middle of the group sat the older gentleman whom he met in the center.

He made such a good impression that he got the job, despite his young age. Quite a success story after that.

After years in the retail business, running several shopping centers and making them profitable, he ended up saving one of Norway's oldest department stores after its bankruptcy.

Due to differences of opinion with a major shareholder, he was expelled and awarded 300 million kronor for his shares in the company. He used this to buy a dilapidated old hotel and started his empire, in a new field he knew nothing about.

Its hotel chain is now one of the largest in Norway, with hotels in Norway, Sweden, Denmark and even a few other countries. He usually does a trick when he opens a new hotel, like zip-lining from the hotel's 15-story roof.

I graduated from the University of Delhi in 2017. After my university, I was looking for better opportunities, although I did not have a stellar profile to apply to large companies, but I did not give up. I believed in myself. For the next two months, I took Linkedin Premium and started looking for better opportunities. I was already tired of being rejected by Tier 1 companies, but I didn't give up.

This answer will be a bit long and if my readers feel they don't read this answer, you guys can skip :).

I've always wanted to work with management consulting firms. Now most of us get it, what am I?

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I graduated from the University of Delhi in 2017. After my university, I was looking for better opportunities, although I did not have a stellar profile to apply to large companies, but I did not give up. I believed in myself. For the next two months, I took Linkedin Premium and started looking for better opportunities. I was already tired of being rejected by Tier 1 companies, but I didn't give up.

This answer will be a bit long and if my readers feel they don't read this answer, you guys can skip :).

I've always wanted to work with management consulting firms. Now most of us get it, what am I talking about? It's holy MBB (McKinsey & Company, Bain & Company & The Boston Consulting group).

It was late at night in August when I saw a notification on my Linkedin profile - "Mckinsey & Company" hiring an operations intern for their new companies. Without much expectation, I applied for the internship. Now if anyone is not aware of this company, let me tell you that it is the best management consulting company in the world and the 10 best places to work according to Forbes. Also, it pays you very well.

After a week, I received an email from the human resources department. The image is as follows:

I freaked out for a moment thinking, it's false. I called the sender's personal number in the email and confirmed it. I was happy and nervous at the same time because I had the opportunity to be interviewed with one of the best consulting firms so far.

The profile was an operations fellow and I first realized that I was going to be asked about some complex operations case studies. I went through all the youtube videos on case studies and estimates. I practiced some of Mckinsey's real-life guesswork and got an idea of ​​all kinds of questions they can ask me. There were three rounds and each round was an elimination round.

The first meeting was at 2:00 pm and I arrived at his office at 1:00 pm wearing my black suit with black shoes. This is how I looked.

I entered their facilities and I got goose bumps when I saw this:

The name says it all.

Let me explain something to you about the interview process. It was divided into three stages.

Round 1: General Introduction About Yourself and Why You Want to Go into the Operations Industry at Mckinsey & Company

Round 2: Everything you did in college so far and tell us something relevant, you may have done it in college, from a competition to winning a competition.

I won't write anything about these two rounds because it would be a waste of my readers time and I don't want to bore my readers, so let's go back to the final round.

Round 3: Technical and problem-solving skills (mainly round of estimations and case studies to check the analytical and problem-solving skills of the candidate).

I went to the last cabin where I was waiting for the global operations analyst. Her name was Nidhi and she was taking my interview.

Suddenly, she walked in.

Me: Hi Nidhi, nice to see you.

N: Hi Shyan, how are you? I received their comments from the gentleman and they were quite satisfied with their interview. Make sure you navigate this well.

Me: I'll do my best, Nidhi. I am fine and nervous at the same time.

N (with a smile): Don't be. Feel relaxed.

So, Shyan, why do you want to be in operations management?

Me: Operations management is the function that converts an organization's resources (materials, labor) into products and services. That is why it is “the main reason for being of any organization.

For those who work in manufacturing, understanding operations is important because it is the area where much of a company's money is made or lost. For those in the service industries, it is important to understand operations as it is a key differentiating factor between companies in the same space. In the case of banks or logistics companies, the value proposition that they offer to consumers is usually based on the functions that the operations department provides.

This is what I learned during my college life and if we could combine these two definitions together, it turns out to be customer service in plain language.

Nidhi seems satisfied with my answer.

N: Okay, so there would be two case studies, one would be a general case study and the other would be an operational case study. We only need your approach for both case studies. We are not concerned with the result here.

Question 1: How are we going to estimate the area of ​​Delhi?

Me: Are you just talking about Delhi or Delhi / NCR?

N: Only Delhi.

Me: I thought for 30 seconds. First, I found out that if we need to calculate the area of ​​something, we need a radius and then we can automatically apply the formula "piR ^ 2 to find the area, but since we need to calculate the area of ​​Delhi, we need to subtract something as well.

So let's assume the Delhi / NCR map looks round and this is how Google maps work ... so I'm not assuming incorrectly.

N: Go ahead.

Me: So, let's take one end of Delhi / NCR - "Jahangir Puri and take another end of Delhi / NCR -" Downtown Huda.

These two points are well connected with metro. So this is basically just a diameter.

Now practically if I have to get to huda city center from jahangirpuri, it takes about 120 minutes.

& metro runs at a speed of about 70 to 80 km / h, excluding all wear and tear, which I assume is not insignificant at the moment.

Distance = Speed ​​* Time.

We know the speed and we know the time (Practically)

Then we can calculate the distance.

but there is a catch as we all know Delhi ends in sultanpur ... so we have to subtract the distance from sultanpur / huda from Jahangirpuri / Huda to get the final distance from Jahangir / Sultanpur which is where Delhi ends.

Now we know the diameter & D / 2 = R.

Put it in a formula and get the estimate.

N (smiling): Well done, Shyan.

Let's go to our final question and it's a real Mckinsey case study.

Pepsico wants to deport one of its plants to Orlando from CA. You have a limited bottleneck and want to take cost optimization in the numbers. Suggest a method to do it in a way that saves Pepsico's cost and labor.

Me: I have no idea what he said: P thinking for a minute.

So since you have a limited bottleneck and they want to take cost optimization in the figures ... then it would be feasible for them to take it piece by piece to another city despite taking it all at once and getting some profit from them and again. using the profit share to transport the rest of their plant to that particular city.

N (confused): Don't you think it will affect your employees? These companies do not compromise with those of their employees. You are trying to move a percentage of an employee to another city by leaving your previous project. Are you dividing them into groups and then expecting this company to make some profit?

How are they going to make a profit?

Me (Blank face): I understood that I lost the game but still did not give up.

Mam, for example, if they deport their employees to another city ... they can help the plant grow and they will have the opportunity to work.

N: That is not what those companies want. They are world leaders in the field of consumer goods and sales. Why are they going to divide their employees at the beginning.

Think rationally at least and I assume you can't

Me: sorry mom.

I cannot come to the conclusion.

N: Shyan, it was simple. There was a catch in the question. You need to improve your vocabulary.

The bottleneck means a failure in the system. It is not a separate term. The answer was simple but you got confused with some fancy methods.

Your employees will work together to find this error and then transport your plant little by little, including all raw materials and products. Of course there is a mathematical way to do it, but I guess you can't because you didn't understand the question.

Thanks for your interview.

We will contact you.

Verdict: Rejected.

From what I have come to realize from this interview: these types of companies don't commit to a single mistake and this is why these companies are great. They pay you well but expect a lot from you with accuracy and precision.

I lost my chance that day, but this interview made me realize that I need to learn a lot.

Someday I'll back :)

Thank you for reading.

Peace.

In terms of career, November 2016 was one of the best times for me because I got 9 job offers, including the big 4 at the same time. How did i do that? Well, I handled all the interviews in the SMARTEST WAY. Before answering this question, let me tell you a truth that most of you do not know. An interviewer is equally nervous, anxious, and scared while interviewing a candidate. Because? Because hiring the wrong candidate can cost a company more than 3 times the employee's monthly salary. When the interviewer asks you different questions like "Why should I hire you?", "What are your strengths?", "Ho

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In terms of career, November 2016 was one of the best times for me because I got 9 job offers, including the big 4 at the same time. How did i do that? Well, I handled all the interviews in the SMARTEST WAY. Before answering this question, let me tell you a truth that most of you do not know. An interviewer is equally nervous, anxious, and scared while interviewing a candidate. Because? Because hiring the wrong candidate can cost a company more than 3 times the employee's monthly salary. When the interviewer asks you different questions like "Why should I hire you?", "What are your strengths?", "How would you do a particular task?" etc., basically the interviewer wants to hear the answer to these questions:

  • Will this candidate be faithful to the company and the job?
  • Will this candidate be a good team player and will he add value to the existing team's capabilities?
  • Does this candidate have the technical or managerial skills necessary to get the job done?
  • What are the ethical and moral standards of the candidate?

Most interviewers are under extreme pressure throughout the hiring process and are desperately looking for THAT person who can do their job and make their life easier. Remember, the interview is a selection process, not the elimination process.

During the 9 interviews for IT consultant positions at leading companies such as Deloitte, PwC, EY, Capgemini, etc. TCS, Infosys, Wipro, PwC, etc., I put together a SMART checklist and created job-specific responses. For most of the interviewer questions, I only chose one of these and came up with a 90-120 second response.

Here's how the points below helped me answer most of the questions in 9 different interviews:

I am confident that I am the best candidate for this position and these are the top four reasons why you should hire me:

  1. Ethics: I am the person who has high ethical work standards and I value them more than anything else. There have been situations in the past where I had to make difficult decisions between choosing short-term benefits or standing up for what is ethically and morally correct. I can proudly say that I never hesitated to deny what is ethically wrong.
  2. Team player: I believe in the words of Ratan Tata “If you want to go fast, move alone. But if you want to go far, go ahead ”. I strongly believe in teamwork and my efforts are always aligned with the success of the team rather than achieving individual metrics. If you ask my former colleagues, they would describe me as a reliable team player, which I think is the greatest achievement for any employee.
  3. Technical Acuity - This position requires technical skills in JAVA, C ++, and APEX. During my previous work as a technology consultant, I have developed multiple complex cloud-based software products for both enterprises and start-ups. At my previous company, I started as a Business Analyst and ended up as a Functional Leader for my project, which shows that I also have leadership capabilities.
  4. Quick learner - Finally, I am a quick learner and I am never ashamed to learn from my peers. For example, in my previous position, I was expected to deliver a weekly status report to the client. Although I didn't have any experience at first, I spent a few hours every day learning the reporting and dashboard capabilities. In 2 months, I started to support my Manager with this task and finally assumed this responsibility.

Have you noticed how you can decipher interviews with minimal preparation and appear smart during the most difficult interviews? My answers may not be 100% applicable to all of you as every job title is different, but you can certainly use some parts like # 1 and # 2. If you notice, I just answered 4 concerns from each interviewer. that are mentioned at the beginning. You have to do the same, you have to find answers to those 4 questions for the job position you are applying for, and you can do it simply by reviewing your past experience and job description.

Can you figure out how you can appear SMART during an interview? Tell me "Yes" or "No" in the comment box below and I will be more than happy to help you. Good luck!

The hardest thing I have ever done is travel from New York to India for my dad's funeral. I was in India for a couple of weeks for my younger brother's wedding and I promised my family that I would be back in 20 days for another couple of weeks of vacation. When I was getting in the car to get to the airport, out of nowhere he hugged me, I was surprised as this had never happened before, never. In hindsight, I suppose it was somewhat sinister for what awaits me.

Dad got sick suddenly and had some minor complications and the doctor assured him that he was fine and that he will be discharged in a couple of days.

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The hardest thing I have ever done is travel from New York to India for my dad's funeral. I was in India for a couple of weeks for my younger brother's wedding and I promised my family that I would be back in 20 days for another couple of weeks of vacation. When I was getting in the car to get to the airport, out of nowhere he hugged me, I was surprised as this had never happened before, never. In hindsight, I suppose it was somewhat sinister for what awaits me.

Dad got sick suddenly and had some minor complications and the doctor assured him that he was fine and that he will be discharged in a couple of days after the observation. I had already booked my tickets to go on vacation, and I called my dad and told him that he didn't take his health seriously and that he should be more responsible about it. From there, until his death (in about 2 days), he avoided talking to me on the phone, as he felt that I was quite hard on him for something so trivial.

2 days before my scheduled departure, early in the morning, I received a call from my wife who had some more complications and that he was going to be transferred to the ICU. I was confused and frantically tried to get to my mom waiting and praying and finally I got my brother. I still remember what he said to this day: brother, he no longer exists and broke down, multiple organ failure. I got help from extended family here to rebook my tickets, and the flight back to India was difficult. As an adult Indian I never cried for about 20 years and that day I cried all the way to the airport, inside the plane and until I got to India. They were taking me to my house and I was telling myself how I was going to see their lifeless form. I got out of the car and went into the house, there he was lying in a glass box,

Time is quite strange and mysterious, from being a husband and father, in a week, he was crudely referred to as just a "body" by people who know him and loved him, I could never call him that, he was still my father. We took him to the ghats for cremation, pushing his body into the chamber was quite mechanical at the time, knowing full well that I can't see his face, hug him or speak to him. But that initial walk home is something I could never forget in my life. I am quite stunned these days, the death of a relative does not affect me as much as the first time, sudden, unprepared.

It took me a lot of time for me to adjust after I came to NYC, I seldom slept alone in my bedroom for a long time, I kept dreaming that I'm getting a phone call with more bad news. I felt pretty bad for my bro, as my dad passed away 15 days from his wedding and he had to take over the family business and finances as I was overseas. This life altering event made me wind everything up in the US and move back to India just to be closer to my mom and brother. I never thought I will go back in India after being in the US for 14 years and making my own life here. But any amount of wealth is not worth the time spent with the family, remember once they go in to the chamber, all you have is those memories.

It was my 22nd birthday. I was in my last semester at MIT. I was young, but I knew my stuff: I had chosen my field at age seven and had gone to MIT specifically because it was the best place in the world to study it. One of the professors spoke for me, and although the appropriate department was not hiring, the company decided to interview me for an entry-level position elsewhere.

The relevant department was having trouble with a process ... one in which I was a legitimate expert. So the head of that department asked me to come over an hour early to chat. I'm standing there a wild boar

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It was my 22nd birthday. I was in my last semester at MIT. I was young, but I knew my stuff: I had chosen my field at age seven and had gone to MIT specifically because it was the best place in the world to study it. One of the professors spoke for me, and although the appropriate department was not hiring, the company decided to interview me for an entry-level position elsewhere.

The relevant department was having issues with a process…one that I was a legitimate expert on. So the head of that department asked me to come in an hour early for a chat. I'm standing there, a whiteboard marker in each hand, going hard. Not only have I seen his problem before, I've fixed it, and I can tell him exactly what to do.

Then the actual hiring manager walks in. He looks…displeased? Fair enough, let's do this.

We get settled, and he gives me a serious look. He has reservations about me, because this position involves the use of Microsoft Office, and I have no experience in that area. If I was hired, could I learn Office?

I explained that I had rather a lot of experience with Office. He asks why it's not on my resume. (Um, because I'm a Millennial with a three digit IQ, so it's implied?) I did not say this out loud. Instead, I sputtered an apology, to the effect that I'd cut some of my less specialized skills to keep the resume to one page.

Then he wants to know why I didn't want to continue working for the startup I interned with. The truth: I absolutely wanted to, but they had only a few months of runway left, and I didn't think they were going to make it. But I wasn't supposed to know that, and I certainly wasn't allowed to tell a direct competitor that, and it's a really bad look to flagrantly ignore your NDA in an interview setting. So I said something to the effect that I was looking for new opportunities, um…because. I'm a bad liar. He knew I was full of it, and kept asking. But I didn't know what else to say, so I kept dodging the question.

I then went around to the rest of the team. They were very interested in how I would handle routine, boring tasks. I'm not too proud for grunt work, and said so. But that was most of what these interviews were about.

It wasn't until I was back in my hotel room that I realized they were trying to tell me I was overqualified. Mind you, I was barely 22, and was not used to thinking of myself this way. But they weren't wrong, and the boss thought the same. I didn't get the job, which was probably for the best.

I got the job. With my teeth stuck together and green drool running down my chin.

I came to Pennsylvania on vacation, and my wife (fiancé then, ex now) suggested I drop off some resumes “in case I wanted to move here”. Her parents lived in that area and didn’t particuraly like where we lived in Georgia.

So I printed a bunch at his mother's house and his father took me to drop them off at the apartment complexes in the area. I explained that I was only in town for a few days, but that I would consider moving for a decent position. I guess I arrived at the right time, almost everyone looked very interesting.

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I got the job. With glued teeth and green slime running down my chin.

I came to Pennsylvania on vacation, and my wife (fiancee then, ex now) suggested that I drop off some resumes "in case I wanted to move here." His parents lived in that area and they didn't particularly like where we lived in Georgia.

So I printed a bunch up at her moms house and her dad took me around to drop them off at apartment complexes in the area. I explained I was only in town a few days but would consider moving for a decent position. I guess I came at the right time, pretty much every one of them seemed really interested and I was offered several jobs so I could pick and choose.

But there was one place I really was interested in much more than the rest, a beautiful place in Yardey, just north of Philly. We rode through the property and I knew my wife would love it. The place was almost new. Pretty buildings, tennis courts, a huge pool. So much nicer than where we lived in Georgia.

Rich (her dad) dropped me off and I went in to give them my resume. One of the ladies brought it to the manager and she asked if I had time to interview right then. I said yes, and we went to the model apartment so we wouldn’t be disturbed. It was the manager, the maintenance man and me. We had just gotten started when they had to leave to handle something, but told me they would be quick and to help myself to whatever snacks I wanted.

Normally I would take a water at most but we had been out for hours and I was starving. There were a lot of choices…water, sodas, cookies, candy. Lots of it. I just decided to have a few Jolly Ranchers. Then a few more.

Before long I had my mouth full of them. I loved the green apple flavor the best. The door opened and my interviewers were back. Much quicker than I expected. I had a big mouthful of sticky green mess and didn’t know what to do. I couldn’t spit them out and I couldn’t swallow them.

We got right down to business and I was mumbling through the questions the best I could. Green slime running out the corners of my mouth, the same mouth that spoke in a thick southern drawl under the best circumstances and now has almost completely failed me.

When the candy dissolved some I figured I would just chew them up. Another big mistake. Now my teeth are stuck together and I’m a total mess. They were smiling and writing notes and I was answering questions the best I could, in grunts and slurred words. Mostly I looked like a rabid Martian ventriloquist without a dummy.

They stood up, I stood up, we shook hands and I left feeling pretty down.

That night they called and offered me the job. I accepted and moved there soon after. Into a nice apartment free of charge, a good salary and insurance for everyone even though we were not married then.

It was a great company and a few years later it was sold to an even better company. I spent 15 years working for them. They were generous and kind and I grew a lot in those years. I learned a lot.

I had my wedding reception at their clubhouse, made a lot of friends, found a place that I finally fit in.

I have been interviewed for a job less than ten times in my life, but interviewing used to be my duty at my previous company. So I've probably interviewed 40-50 times in a year. I have worked for almost 2 years in that field, so maybe 80 times.

Below is the experience that I would like to share, but it is not part of the question.

In my first year of my HR career, I participated in a career expo that included interviewing candidates on foot, so we probably did 15 candidates a day for each of us (between me and my colleague). The exhibition lasted two days.

I informed a mentor. H

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I have been interviewed for a job less than ten times in my life, but interviewing used to be my duty at my previous company. So I've probably interviewed 40-50 times in a year. I have worked for almost 2 years in that field, so maybe 80 times.

Below is the experience that I would like to share, but it is not part of the question.

In my first year of my HR career, I participated in a career expo that included interviewing candidates on foot, so we probably did 15 candidates a day for each of us (between me and my colleague). The exhibition lasted two days.

I informed a mentor. He took me to his interviews. While it was one of the most memorable experiences of my life, the race was not my cup of tea.

Denying someone because of a disability.

This happened around 2005 in Cleveland, Ohio, in the Tremont neighborhood, and I had recently moved from job to job and was happy to work in a slow-growing economy.

I finished school after a long career change process. I got into architecture and I already had some experiences. This architect caught me while he was re-growing his office. It was a good time due to the current job I had, which is a completely different answer to a different question.

I was interviewing different people and one day a nice lady came in to be interviewed. It was not me

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Denying someone because of a disability.

This happened around 2005 in Cleveland, Ohio, in the Tremont neighborhood, and I had recently moved from job to job and was happy to work in a slow-growing economy.

I finished school after a long career change process. I got into architecture and I already had some experiences. This architect caught me while he was re-growing his office. It was a good time due to the current job I had, which is a completely different answer to a different question.

He was interviewing different people and one day a nice lady came in to be interviewed. I wasn’t involved in the interview process, but it was what he so casually said in his defense to not give her an offer.

He described how realized that she is deaf. The proper term is hearing-impaired. How she was straining to pay attention when he wasn’t looking directly at her when talking. How he realized that she was reading his lips. How could we work if she doesn’t hear everything and we would have to have direct face to face interaction.

I know how. You compensate. You grow up and get over it. He did mention that she had a great portfolio of work, but just couldn’t get over that “handicap” of her’s. I wanted to find her and tell her and encourage her to file a lawsuit. I lost what little respect I had for the guy at that moment.

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