What is the best thing about your job?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Noah Pearson



What is the best thing about your job?

The part where I go out and out the door at 90 miles per hour like my ass is on fire.

No, seriously… I enjoy providing care that helps improve the overall quality of life for my dependents.

Now it has been tough last year and it has changed. I worked in the Covid unit and it has hit me more than I thought. Sometimes I write a post that recounts my experiences in the time of Covid and I share it on Facebook.

I really enjoy my job. But I'll be honest; sometimes I take a lot of what I see and experience ... I take it home with me. There are times when I come home from work, bawli

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The part where I go out and out the door at 90 miles per hour like my ass is on fire.

No, seriously… I enjoy providing care that helps improve the overall quality of life for my dependents.

Now it has been tough last year and it has changed. I worked in the Covid unit and it has hit me more than I thought. Sometimes I write a post that recounts my experiences in the time of Covid and I share it on Facebook.

I really enjoy my job. But I'll be honest; sometimes I take a lot of what I see and experience ... I take it home with me. There are times when I come home from work, crying because I just watched several residents die (usually from Covid-19, but there are other causes) and I just don't know what to do with that kind of pain. .

Sometimes I read my posts on Facebook. Usually this is when I have been questioning my ability to do my job or questioning the decision to pursue nursing. Many times I feel like I am breaking my heart because I choose to work in the Covid unit and take care of those patients, knowing that they may die.

But there are many who manage to get ahead and those are the success stories. There were many heartbreaking moments that I wish I could go back and fix. I wrote about my experiences on Facebook (limited details; sometimes I don't even confirm the sex / gender of the residents in question) and then I read it again and often break down in tears. I begin to doubt myself and to question my choice of vocation.

But then I take the time to think about all those people that I helped care for. I look at my hands and remember how I held the hands of dying residents, consoled their suffering, wiped their tears, stroked their hair while singing to them. For those who don't know, listening is the last thing to disappear when a person is dying, so I made it a point to make the last thing they hear something of comfort, of love.

That is what I enjoy the most, being part of so many lives. Knowing that I touched many lives, that what I do makes a difference.

I work as an engineer, so first and foremost I get to work on interesting projects and with some of the best minds in the industry (specifically, our company is a contract manufacturer that includes design services).

But one of the advantages of my job is that I have practically no supervision. I've been "given" a manager's title, but technically I'm more of a senior engineer at our companies. I create my own to-do list based on my personal project list and work with that.

  • Basically, I have carved a good niche within our company and, to a large extent, I can select my projects.
  • I can also go with sales in c
Keep reading

I work as an engineer, so first and foremost I get to work on interesting projects and with some of the best minds in the industry (specifically, our company is a contract manufacturer that includes design services).

But one of the advantages of my job is that I have practically no supervision. I've been "given" a manager's title, but technically I'm more of a senior engineer at our companies. I create my own to-do list based on my personal project list and work with that.

  • Basically, I have carved a good niche within our company and, to a large extent, I can select my projects.
  • I can also go with sales on customer visits, which average about one trip a year. It's not excessive, but I can still travel a bit.
  • Why did you decide to become an engineering manager rather than remain an engineer?
  • What is the difference between a senior and a principal engineer?

Of course, sometimes there are fires that need to be put out, but that goes with the territory.

  • What didn't you realize would be an unintended consequence of being an engineer?

Here's Wally's take on a dream job….

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