What is the best response to "tell us about yourself" during a UPSC interview?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Issac Bowman



What is the best response to "tell us about yourself" during a UPSC interview?

Start with your story of why you wanted to join the civil service. Make a brief introduction from education and professional achievements. Mainly explain your role when you were in a position of authority and how you performed.

Everything should be brief.

Well, the best way is to follow the first. Toppers mock interview videos are available on youtube.

But a general introduction to any interview is the same, be it a corporate sector interview or an upsc interview with minor modifications. You should start with your name, then your hometown, graduation subject, and the name of the university, and if you are doing any work, say so. Finish the introduction with your hobby.

It is simple…

Questions like "tell me about yourself" or "describe yourself" are usually meant to break the ice, from what I've felt. Most people tend to take them so seriously that instead of helping the interviewer break the ice, they freeze! "About me? Well I ..."

  • So the first thing to do is avoid unnecessary anxiety. You could use it in a better way later. Think of it this way: you have a date, let's say, a blind date. You don't know anything about the other person, she doesn't know anything about you either. You just come and sit and you are not talking, what should the other do?
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Questions like "tell me about yourself" or "describe yourself" are usually meant to break the ice, from what I've felt. Most people tend to take them so seriously that instead of helping the interviewer break the ice, they freeze! "About me? Well I ..."

  • So the first thing to do is avoid unnecessary anxiety. You could use it in a better way later. Think of it this way: you have a date, let's say, a blind date. You don't know anything about the other person, she doesn't know anything about you either. You just come and sit and you are not talking, what should the other person do? Speak, right? Obviously, what is the point of two people sitting at a table, face to face, with nothing to do or say? And in all likelihood, the first question they will ask you will be: "So, tell me something about yourself."

    The interviewer's intent behind asking you to actually introduce yourself is not all that different.
  • That doesn't mean you won't be judged on what you say here. But it will not be the sort of decisive judgment that the interviewer must make. There is still a long way to go for that to happen yet. So take it easy.
  • Now, think of all the things that really define you and define you in a way that would make a stranger (in this case, a prospective employer) take an interest in you. You could blurt out answers you've read on the internet, but I really don't think that helps you much. You can always ask for more details or explanations in addition to the initial introduction.
  • "I'm a creative person"
    "Oh really, creative like in what? Do you remember an incident where your creativity helped you solve a problem?"
    "..."
  • An answer learned by heart will not allow you to think quickly in that case. Being honest and real, on the other hand, gives you the ability to do so, as it essentially requires you to tell the truth.

    Before the interview, write down all the things that define you: your background, your hobbies, your passions, your activities, your philosophies, your ideologies, your strengths, your weaknesses, your achievements, etc.

    Now, try to figure out which ones will allow a stranger to see an interesting side of you. That is actually what the interviewer hopes to see as well. Try to be unique, diverse and original in the way you express yourself.

    You could say exactly what you read on the internet or from someone else, but saying it in a different way, adding layers to it, can help you stand out.

    For instance:
  • "My biggest weakness is that I am a workaholic." (you wish!)
  • vs.
  • "I don't know if this counts as a weakness or not, but I guess the fact that I love being busy often causes me to miss out on some fun moments with friends and family.
  • I made it up to exemplify the difference you can make to your answers by using words wisely.
  • DO NOT mention personal details like your family history UNLESS the interviewer asks for it. It takes unnecessary time, it may be a detour for some interviewers, it may go against the policy of some companies, and it is not one of the most important things to mention. Then? What's the point of starting on that note?
    Personally, I like to value the interviewer's time and not mention unnecessary information unless he specifically asks for it.
  • Ideally, it could include:
    1. Your name
    2. Your educational history / achievements, both from college and school
    3. Your most significant work experience / achievement
    4. Your hobbies, with more emphasis on your passion (s). You could support the same with an example perhaps.
    5. The things in life / career that matter most to you
    6. Why are you interviewing for your company?
    7. Try to think of a sentence about yourself to finish. Probably the motto of your life
  • Those are the only cases you can choose from. But I really suggest you be original and think for yourself. Be creative, imaginative, and organized.
  • For each adjective you use for yourself, be prepared with some real-life examples. You will hate if you end up wondering and looking around when asked to justify that you are what you said you are. It can be incredibly embarrassing and can make you a lot more nervous ... and it's just the first question so far!
    So if you think you won't be able to spontaneously recall such anecdotes in the actual interview, keep a few handy (in your memory, of course).
  • And oh yeah, don't overstretch it. Speak quality. Cover the most important / interesting things first. Leave it up to the interviewer if you want to ask for more, take off from something you said, or move on to another question.

Interview Transcript: Civil Services Exam 2017
Interview Scores: 191/275

Background:
Graduation: IIT Kanpur in Mathematics and Scientific Computing
Optional: Mathematics
Intent: 3rd
Interview: First Interview
Date: April 18, afternoon session
Interview Board: PK Joshi Sir

I entered the room. He wished the president, the lady member and other members good afternoon. The president asked me to take a seat. It went through my DAF (detailed application form). He read (aloud) that he graduated from IIT Kanpur. You have a good CGPA. (This made me feel comfortable).

President: You were preparing

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Interview Transcript: Civil Services Exam 2017
Interview Scores: 191/275

Background:
Graduation: IIT Kanpur in Mathematics and Scientific Computing
Optional: Mathematics
Intent: 3rd
Interview: First Interview
Date: April 18, afternoon session
Interview Board: PK Joshi Sir

I entered the room. He wished the president, the lady member and other members good afternoon. The president asked me to take a seat. It went through my DAF (detailed application form). He read (aloud) that he graduated from IIT Kanpur. You have a good CGPA. (This made me feel comfortable).

President: Were you preparing for civil service after graduation?
Me: Yes sir.
C: You have to teach dispersion and skewness to Class 8 students. How are you going to teach? (question based on graduation)
Me: Sir, I know about skewness, but I can't remember scattering. I had studied statistics in my second year. I have taken courses mainly in pure mathematics.
C: So you don't know about standard deviation, and then you went on to ask some more statistical terms. (question based on graduation)
Me: Sir, I have studied these concepts. But it's been a long time. So I can't remember.
C: Suppose you are secretary of agriculture of the Ministry of Agriculture in the UP government. Suggest some measures to double the income of farmers in UP.
(In Mains, I wrote an essay on the topic of farmers, so I was prepared, I provided data with a detailed explanation)
Me: Sir, UP is an economy based on agriculture. 77 percent of UP's population lives in rural areas. Therefore, attention must be paid to agriculture. In the Bundelkhand region, the soil is hard and rainfall is low. We need to improve the irrigation facilities in that region. 84% of the products of the Bundelkhand region are food grains, while its climate is more suitable for oilseeds and legumes. We must encourage farmers to move towards pulses and oilseeds. Cattle productivity is low in UP. We must import high quality semen to increase productivity in the livestock sector. Farmers have a poor connection to the market. We need to connect farmers to the market and eliminate middlemen. Food waste is very high in UP. Special attention should be paid to creating more food processing units. In UP, a large number of farmers are sugarcane producers. In the UP, the productivity of sugarcane is low compared to Brazil and Cuba. We must focus on improving the productivity of sugarcane. That is all. (I had to stop if I hadn't given a speech) We must focus on improving the productivity of sugarcane. That is all. (I had to stop if I hadn't given a speech) We must focus on improving the productivity of sugarcane. That is all. (I had to stop if I hadn't given a speech)
C: Suppose you go from Delhi to Agra by highway. The speed of his vehicle is 60 km / h and when he returned there was congestion on the road, so the speed of his vehicle was 40 km / h. Tell me the average speed.
(when he mentioned the word 'congestion', I thought he was going to ask me about the congestion problem in Delhi)
Me: (The president directed me to use pencil and paper in front of me) After calculating, I said sir that it is 48 km / h.
C: Why don't we take an average of 40 and 60 to calculate the average speed?
Me: Sir, distance and time are basic units, not speed. So the average speed should be the total distance over the total time.
C: Tell me what kind of medium is it?
Me: Sir, harmonic middle.

The president asked member 1 to ask questions.

M1: So you have lived in UP. UP has four regions, Western UP, Eastern UP, Bundelkhand and Awadh UP. Western UP is developed. Tell me about measures to develop the other three regions.
Me: Sir, in the Bundelkhand region, the ground is hard and rainfall is low. We need to improve the irrigation facilities in that region. 84% of the products of the Bundelkhand region are food grains, while its climate is more suitable for oilseeds and legumes. We must encourage farmers to move towards pulses and oilseeds.
M1: (cut me off) Do you know that Bundelkhand has a lot of water below 20 feet?
Me: I'm not aware of that, sir.
M1: ok continue
Me: Sir, to address the irrigation problem, we must judicially encourage the linking of rivers. Sir, in the east of the UP the lands are very small. We must promote the consolidation of land ownership and cooperative agriculture. In Sultanpur, which is part of eastern UP, from the Kans tree, badh is made which is used to make charpoy. These products can be exported abroad to improve the economy of the region. For the development of the three regions, it is necessary to address the problems of agriculture. Sir, in order to achieve a higher growth rate, attention should also be paid to the handloom and handicraft sector. In these areas, there is a problem of poor marketing, low availability of credit. We must promote the formation of a cooperative society of weavers,
M1: Tell me about some artisan products from eastern UP.
Me: Sir, Varanasi Sari and Chikankari works from Lucknow.
M1: (interrupted me) Lucknow is not part of East Up.
Me: Sorry sir, I cannot recall other products.
M1: Except UP, in what other places have you lived.
Me: Sir, in my 3rd year, I lived in Hyderabad for 2 months and during my 11th and 12th, I have lived in Kota. (I was excepting a comparative study of some regions and these areas of the UP).
M1: Ok leave it. He has lived in Kanpur for five years. Tell me the reasons for the decline of the textile industries there.
Me: Post independence sir, the textile factories were taken over by Jaipuriyas and another wealthy class. They began to make profits that they used in the expansion of the textile industries and not in the modernization of these industries. This led to the closure of many textile factories. So the government. took over some textile factories in 1971 to address the problems. But due to irregularities and inefficiency, the industries were unable to recover. Later, in the 1970s, the unions became a strong force and hindered the smooth running of these mills.
M1: Do you see any resurgence in these industries today?
Me: Sir, I don't see a resurgence right now because the focus in Kanpur has shifted to the leather industries and hosiery units. But it should be revived given the skilled workforce present in Kanpur.
M1: You mentioned about the leather industries. Tell me about the steps the government has taken to clean up the Ganges River.
Me: Sir, the Ganges Action Plan was launched in 1985. Recently, in 2015, the Namami Gange program was launched. Under Namami Gange, effluent monitoring networks are being established. So far, 68 wastewater treatment plants have been built and 12 are under construction. Cleaning of the river surface is in process. Under Ganga Gram Yojana, which is part of the Namami Gange program, the villages along the Ganges River are free from open defecation. The Supreme Court has ordered the closure of many leather tanneries to prevent contamination of the Ganges.

The president ordered the second member to ask questions.
M2: You asked a question about finance and math.
Me: I tested the problem on rough paper. But such a response calculation will take time. He said quit.
M2: Kashmir is part of Pakistan.
Me: (interrupted) No sir, it's part of India.
M2: Let me complete the question (all members started laughing). Kashmir is part of Pakistan. This is what Pakistan says. Then the member stated some fact about Kashmir. Then at the end he asked me, tell me about Kashmir problems and their solutions.
Me: Sir, Kashmir has two problems. One is the alienation of people living on their own devices and the second is cross-border terrorism. To tackle cross-border terrorism, we need to have bilateral talks, reverse channel talks, high-level talks. And to tackle the problem of alienation of people, we must involve young people in education and employment. We must promote tourism and other economic activities.
M2: We have been in bilateral talks with them for a long time. The problem has not been resolved yet.
Me: Sir, the Kashmir issue has become an emotional issue. Pakistani political parties use Kashmir to win votes during elections. And sir, emotional problems take time to resolve.
M2: Will you go with your wife in such an environment?
Me: I didn't say a word. (He just smiled)
M2: So where will the tourism sector get its income from? What about Geelani?
Me: Sir, we should also have indirect talks with them to ease tension in the region.

Member 3
M3: You mentioned cross-border terrorism. Why don't we call it LoC cross terrorism, because everything is happening in the LoC now?
Me: Sir, under the Shimla Accord in 1973 the LoC was defined. Although it is through LoC. They have to cross the border. (I got nervous here)
M3: You seem a bit confused. Tell me what's near Kashmir.
Me: Sir, Siachen Glacier.
M3: Tell me more about that.
Me: sir In 1984, under Operation Meghdoot. India occupied it.
M3: First time the Indian army went to this place?
Me: Sir 1980. (Since I was not sure of the year, I said decade)
M3: 1980 is the correct answer. Can you tell me the exact coordinates from where the dispute starts?
Me: Sir, NJ9842
M3: What is the exact dispute?
Me: Sir in an agreement, it was written that "from there from the north."
Pakistan and India have a different interpretation on this line. Pakistan says it has land as far as Karakoram. India says the division should be vertical.
M3: (He corrected me). For the Indian border line, go on the west side. But it is not a big mistake. Pakistan has given China some land. Why are we not taking land directly from China?
Me: Sir, there was an agreement whereby it is written that the dispute between India and Pakistan is resolved. India and China can renegotiate that land. Because Pakistan is a good ally of China. Then China will not return the land.
M3: Tell me the year that agreement was signed.
Me: Sir, I don't know.
M3: Count the decade.
Me: Sir, 1960. (I guessed this)
M3: Well, I wanted to ask you about CPEC but I see that you will be able to answer that question. So I ask you a different question. Suppose the corridor reaches India through Kathmandu. Should we join or not? Give arguments both for and against.
Me: Sir, given the economic integration in the region, we will also benefit from it. Since India wants the early completion of the BCIM corridor due to its economic benefit. India should join the project.
M3: Now an argument against.
Me: (After taking a few seconds) Sir, the government of India has raised concerns about Chinese infrastructure projects due to lack of transparency. China says its projects have only one economic goal. But India is concerned that the projects may have hidden political goals. Therefore, India should also take that point into account when joining those projects.

M4 was a female member.
M4: What are the health problems of women and children? Tell me the government programs related to that. (Hobby-related question)
Me: Mom, women have two problems: low BMI and anemia. More than 50% of women suffer from anemia. In children, the problems are stunting and underweight.
Government programs are Janani Suraksha Yojana to encourage institutional deliveries. National Nursery Program for the provision of nursery schools to working women from 6 months of age to 6 years of age. The SABLA scheme is for nutritional support to adolescents. Mission Indradhanush is for the immunization of children.
M4: Don't you think ICDS is not an initiator?
Me: Mom, stunting has been reduced since 2005-06 according to the National Family Health Survey. It is 38.4% according to NFHS 4.
M4: Suggest some measures to make teaching an attractive profession.
Me: Mom, in the last 15 years China has improved the quality of its education. The reason cited is that the teachers, there, have good residential facilities, shelter and dining room. These kinds of advantages attract young minds to join the teaching profession. And Mom, we need to improve the quality of teacher training. In a recent budget, the government proposed Integrated B.Ed. Program. These steps are a step in the right direction.

The president said his interview is over. I said thank you sir, thank you mom and thank you gentlemen.

First, I need to clarify that although this is a popular question, there is no mandate that it be asked in every interview. It was the last question of my interview. So I'll narrate it, the best I can remember.

Ch (while interrupting another member): Ok Nikhil, this will be the last question in this interview, were you good at coding?

Me: Yes sir, I was.

Ch: So you could have become the next narayan murthy of India, why did you choose this path?

Me: Sir, coming from a middle class family with various financial constraints, I was lucky enough to gain admission to a public university (NIT

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First, I need to clarify that although this is a popular question, there is no mandate that it be asked in every interview. It was the last question of my interview. So I'll narrate it, the best I can remember.

Ch (while interrupting another member): Ok Nikhil, this will be the last question in this interview, were you good at coding?

Me: Yes sir, I was.

Ch: So you could have become the next narayan murthy of India, why did you choose this path?

Me: Sir, coming from a middle class family with various financial constraints, I was lucky enough to gain admission to a public university (NIT allahabad). I also have an older sister, who was studying engineering simultaneously, so this significantly reduced the financial burden. This created a strong feeling in me that I have taken something from society, so I should give it back. Later I did the preparation of a government assisted training center (RCA CCCP, Jamia) that reinforced this thinking.

Ch: Don't you think that Narayan Murthy has also given something to society?

Me: Sure sir, it did

Ch: So why the civil services specifically?

Me: Sir, while I was working in the private sector, there were several incidents where I wanted to do something that was vital to someone, be it construction workers or people living in poverty. But I soon realized that I neither had the financial capacity nor the time to run it on my own. I had the option of opting for an NGO or in the government sector. I sincerely believe that government is the welfare arm of society and that is its only goal. I thought that by being a part of it I could not only help those in need but also have decent professional growth, so I chose this path.

Ch: nodded

Me: Sir, I want to narrate an incident from my past. I once tried to provide water in a construction field, unable to provide a permanent solution, I provided the water bottles to the family of construction workers. To my surprise, the water in the bottle was not very valuable, rather the bottle was a luxury for them. Until now they had to bend and drink water from a cracked pipe just above the separator, now they had a bottle to fill it. Sometimes we have to step in to meet the needs of the people we want to serve. In my opinion, no one but the government can do better.

Ch: Thanks Nikhil, your interview is over. Now you can go.

The interview ended with that line leading to a score of 180 on it.

During my first interview (CSE-2015), the president of the interview board (Prof. HC Gupta) asked me a question about my place of graduation, that is, Manipal, Karnataka:

“The Manipal-Mangalore region is known for having the headquarters of many banks. Can you name five banks that have headquarters in that region? "

This question completely puzzled me, as I had prepared a lot about Karnataka, but had not realized this fact. However, I made an effort and was able to name 4 out of 5 of those banks.

Another question was about the Prime Minister's visit to Katra, Jammu and Kashmir, on the day of the interview:

President:

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During my first interview (CSE-2015), the president of the interview board (Prof. HC Gupta) asked me a question about my place of graduation, that is, Manipal, Karnataka:

“The Manipal-Mangalore region is known for having the headquarters of many banks. Can you name five banks that have headquarters in that region? "

This question completely puzzled me, as I had prepared a lot about Karnataka, but had not realized this fact. However, I made an effort and was able to name 4 out of 5 of those banks.

Another question was about the Prime Minister's visit to Katra, Jammu and Kashmir, on the day of the interview:

President: "What is the capacity of the hospital inaugurated by the Prime Minister (in terms of number of beds)?"

My answer was even more unexpected than the question this time. I replied, without thinking, "Sir, 300"!

During my 2nd Interview (CSE-2016), one of the board members, a very old lady, asked me another unexpected question. He opened a journal he had with him, then proceeded to read a question:

“A candle burns for an hour. As long as you have several such candles, how will you calculate 2 and a half hours? "

This question was similar to the kind of questions floating around on various social media platforms, described as actual questions that have been asked in 'IAS Interviews'. Therefore, I was a bit surprised.

When I proceeded to answer the question, she said, “Forget it!” And continued with a monologue, to which all I could say was a series of 'yes ma'am.'

During my third interview (CSE-2018), although there were no questions that could be considered unexpected, the chair of the board (Ms. M. Sathiyavathy) made a comment that, as a bit unexpected:

While discussing the comparatively lower number of foreign tourist arrivals to India, I said that the perception that India is an unsafe country, particularly for single women traveling, could also be a reason for this. To which she commented: "It's just a perception, because I myself feel insecure venturing outside after 8pm."
I replied, "Ma'am, there have actually been cases of crimes against women in the past, but those crimes are decreasing."

Thanks for A2A. It was my last attempt and the fourth UPSC CSE interview. The chairperson of the board was Ms. Sujata Mehta Ma'am.

A member started asking me about Yoga as I had mentioned in my DAF that yoga was my hobby and had received yoga practitioner training at the Morarji Desai National Yoga Institute.

Few questions surprised me. Here is the transcript of what happened inside the room.

Member 3: So Mr. Pandey, what is yoga?

Me: According to Sutra 1.2 of the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali "yoga chitta vritti nirodha" .: That is, Yoga is the silencing of the modifications of the mind.

Member: was taken aba

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Thanks for A2A. It was my last attempt and the fourth UPSC CSE interview. The chairperson of the board was Ms. Sujata Mehta Ma'am.

A member started asking me about Yoga as I had mentioned in my DAF that yoga was my hobby and had received yoga practitioner training at the Morarji Desai National Yoga Institute.

Few questions surprised me. Here is the transcript of what happened inside the room.

Member 3: So Mr. Pandey, what is yoga?

Me: According to Sutra 1.2 of the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali "yoga chitta vritti nirodha" .: That is, Yoga is the silencing of the modifications of the mind.

Member: I was puzzled by my Sanskrit and my deep knowledge of yoga. He had preconceived that like others, he had just written to show off. The member went on to ask interesting questions. What are the tips of yoga?

Me: There are 8 branches of yoga.

  • Yama.
  • Niyama.
  • Asana.
  • Pranayama.
  • Pratyahara.
  • Dharana.
  • Dhyana.
  • Samadhi.

I continued to explain them in detail.

Member: He was amused and started to smile slyly. The next question was a gorilla. He said you have great knowledge of yoga, why don't you become a yoga guru? They are doing well these days. Do I see in you all the qualities of the next yoga guru?

Me: I started thinking. Then I remembered a quote from Swami Vivekananda. The goal of life is twofold "Atmano mokshartham jagat hitaya cha", the salvation of our individual being and the well-being of all on earth.

I kept telling him that yoga is for my salvation and civil services are for the welfare of the earth. Therefore, by joining the civil service as a yogi, I will achieve the dual purpose of my life.

Member: Now he became more combative. He said that psychology says that man is motivated by sex, money and power. Where does this yoga fit in there?

Me: I accept what you say sir, but the vision of psychology you are talking about was Freud's, today psychology has become a new branch of positive psychology. According to him, everyone wants to be happy and true happiness comes from within and from helping others, that is, from living a meaningful life.

Member: Smile and say I'm done. Then he asks the next member to ask questions.

Me: Sigh of relief.

I hope everyone enjoyed it. Applicants interested in knowing more about the UPSC CSE interview can contact me (Telegram channel is on my quora profile) as I have a great experience in attending 4 CSE interviews.

You have not mentioned the exact circumstances, i.e. personal or professional, etc. But, from the framing of your question, I assume this is a professional setting. Depending on your education, experience, skill level, interpersonal skills, etc., your answer will be slightly different, but here are a few points.

Don't sound too eager (most important) and don't sound indifferent (equally important). Your voice should be respectful, polite, and speak clearly and slowly. This takes practice for most people. Practice this with your friends.

Be reasonably brief. I would say between a minute

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You have not mentioned the exact circumstances, i.e. personal or professional, etc. But, from the framing of your question, I assume this is a professional setting. Depending on your education, experience, skill level, interpersonal skills, etc., your answer will be slightly different, but here are a few points.

Don't sound too eager (most important) and don't sound indifferent (equally important). Your voice should be respectful, polite, and speak clearly and slowly. This takes practice for most people. Practice this with your friends.

Be reasonably brief. I'd say between a minute and two. You can say up front - I'll try to be brief, but I'd love to detail any aspect if you'd like. Please ask me.

Be as relevant as possible (80% - 90%). Usually no one is interested in your childhood story or what you did in college or if you like tennis or soccer.

Work backwards, generally speaking, when it comes to work experience (this is for a job interview). What you have been doing most recently is the most relevant. Also spend more time on recent things.

This is the hardest. If you are really proud of something, save it for last. Don't open with that.

Finally, remember that an introduction is no big deal. So don't worry. Your goal is not to do perfectly well. Not messing it up is usually enough. And the only real way you can screw it up is by saying something offensive or politically incorrect or by rambling (A LOT of people rambling, I used to do it too until someone corrected me).

I have appeared for 4 UPSC IAS interviews (the so-called personality test). Therefore, I have a lot of personal experience and have seen at least 100 live cases while waiting for my turn in the UPSC building.

My experience:

CSE 2011: Board Mr. Reddy, Duration 20 min. Baord was very cowardly and supportive, as it was my first attempt. I performed well to the best of my knowledge. 196/300 marks were awarded.

CSE 2013: Board of Directors Mr. APSingh. Duration 25 min. Friendly president but annoying honorary board members. I was tense I made mistakes. Marks 151/275

CSE 2016: Board of Directors Mr. Bassi. Duration: 40 min. President no

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I have appeared for 4 UPSC IAS interviews (the so-called personality test). Therefore, I have a lot of personal experience and have seen at least 100 live cases while waiting for my turn in the UPSC building.

My experience:

CSE 2011: Board Mr. Reddy, Duration 20 min. Baord was very cowardly and supportive, as it was my first attempt. I performed well to the best of my knowledge. 196/300 marks were awarded.

CSE 2013: Board of Directors Mr. APSingh. Duration 25 min. Friendly president but annoying honorary board members. I was tense I made mistakes. Marks 151/275

CSE 2016: Board of Directors Mr. Bassi. Duration: 40 min. The president does not support and does not listen. The members asked good questions and I answered well. Points: 157/275

CSE 2017: Council: Ms. Sujata Mehta. Duration: 35 min. Very very cordial President. Very good questions and cordial members. Done very well. All satisfied. Ratings: 168/275.

But while waiting, I have also seen candidates expelled in 10 to 15 minutes.

I once saw a candidate who came out crying because he felt he was not acting. Later I found out that he got IPS and very good marks in the interview.

Similarly, a friend from a minority was asked if he thought they are discriminated against in the country. He panicked because he wasn't sure what to answer. He got bad grades.

Learning: the average duration of the interview is 25 minutes. Never judge inside and always be confident and comfortable.

If you want I can share in detail my UPSC interviews that will help you prepare well. Candidates who wish to prepare for the IAS interview can contact me at asksantohsir@gmail.com.

One thing I want to share (please don't laugh and pull my legs). When I went to my 4 IAS interview, one person said that you know better than we do how to take an interview. Because I was doing an interview for the first time. He said you had more experience than me. Ha ha ha ... they have their ways of making fun of candidates ha ha ...

God bless you all!!

The personality test, which is the final door to the so-called corridors of power, to foreign, civil, police and other services, is perceived as the proverbial X-factor in a candidate's success story. The 275 marks of the personality test (out of a total of 2,025 points) are significant, as the UPSC can award up to 80% or as little as 30% of the budgeted marks.

For the most part, the least expected scores in the CSE interview are between 130 and 140, however, in some cases, it can go even lower.

Rachit Raj sir AIR 3 in CSE 2013 scored 138 in interview.

I got 143 in the 2015 CSE interview and I couldn't make it to the

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The personality test, which is the final door to the so-called corridors of power, to foreign, civil, police and other services, is perceived as the proverbial X-factor in a candidate's success story. The 275 marks of the personality test (out of a total of 2,025 points) are significant, as the UPSC can award up to 80% or as little as 30% of the budgeted marks.

For the most part, the least expected scores in the CSE interview are between 130 and 140, however, in some cases, it can go even lower.

Rachit Raj sir AIR 3 in CSE 2013 scored 138 in interview.

I got 143 in the 2015 CSE interview and couldn't get on the merit list.

This implies that it is their performance on the net that can catapult an aspiring to the top 100 or simply knock them off the bill.

Thank you for reading.

A2A.

  1. Geography of the state and the city: some specific characteristics like a sacred mountain or any river. Some people were also asked the latitude and longitude of their city!
  2. How many districts and divisions are there in the state?
  3. Historical importance of the state, for example, Haryana is famous for the Battles of Panipat, and Gurugram is famous for being the Village of Guru Dronacharya.
  4. Economy of your state: how much agricultural and industrial production, famous products, exports, tourism, etc.
  5. Problems associated with the state: social problems such as caste discrimination, gender inequality, naxal problems, pollution
Keep reading

A2A.

  1. Geography of the state and the city: some specific characteristics like a sacred mountain or any river. Some people were also asked the latitude and longitude of their city!
  2. How many districts and divisions are there in the state?
  3. Historical importance of the state, for example, Haryana is famous for the Battles of Panipat, and Gurugram is famous for being the Village of Guru Dronacharya.
  4. Economy of your state: how much agricultural and industrial production, famous products, exports, tourism, etc.
  5. Problemas asociados al estado: cuestiones sociales como discriminación de castas, desigualdad de género, problemas naxales, contaminación, etc.
  6. Specialties of the state - any clothing or food. Recently, Jhumka of Bareilly was in news as a 270kg jhumka has been set up on a national highway. So you should be aware of such factoids.

The best way to do this is to collaborate with others in the state so that your work is reduced and you can ask each other questions to be more through.

All the best for your interview

Be straightforward and to the point in your answers. Don’t beat around the bush. Keep a smile but don’t smile too much during serious thought provoking questions.

Be humble if you don’t know the answer to that question and gladly accept the fact that you cannot answer 100% of the questions.

Be courteous while arriving in the room and wish every member on your way back as well. Maintain eye contact and listen to every word carefully.

Don’t be nervous even though it’s nerve wracking inside, keep a calm and cool head and you’re sure to emerge out as a winner!

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