What is the best online site for computer certification courses that adds weight to the curriculum?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Zak Cooke



What is the best online site for computer certification courses that adds weight to the curriculum?

Some of the websites that I have recommended to others are edX, Udemy, Skillshare, Coursera, Masterclass, etc. These education providers offer certification, some are affiliated with universities, and sometimes offer almost (discounted) or completely free courses. And by the way, since you are looking for courses that will add weight to your resume, you should also consider going for college affiliated courses alongside certificate courses.

Although these education provider websites offer relevant courses, there is an online information overload and it can take a long time to search each provider's website. You have to keep jumping from one website to another to compare courses.

So when I have to find an online learning option, I use Lore. It is a website that allows you to search and compare online learning options from various education providers such as Simplilearn, eduCBA, Simpliv, Udacity, etc. It also shows relevant videos from YouTube and Vimeo along with the courses. You can save a lot of research time by using Lore filters to narrow down the list of learning options.

These filters include prior experience, budget, college affiliation, certification, and user qualifications. Lore also provides you with recommendations based on your career interests, the skills you want to develop, and other preferences.

Do data science MOOC certificates add value to a resume?

Good question. It helps you? Up to what point? It is questionable. However, you can certainly fill out your resume and LinkedIn profile fairly quickly. :)

I came across this gentleman's profile on LinkedIn and he listed many MOOCs on his profile.

It is here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/adornes?authType=name&authToken=aGk2&trk=hp-feed-member-name

The interesting and very smart thing about his approach is that he received a recommendation from a Johns Hopkins professor, from whom I assume he took some of his MOOCs. He is working as a data scientist.

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Do data science MOOC certificates add value to a resume?

Good question. It helps you? Up to what point? It is questionable. However, you can certainly fill out your resume and LinkedIn profile fairly quickly. :)

I came across this gentleman's profile on LinkedIn and he listed many MOOCs on his profile.

It is here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/adornes?authType=name&authToken=aGk2&trk=hp-feed-member-name

What's interesting and very smart about his approach is that he received a recommendation from a Johns Hopkins professor, from whom I assume he took some of his MOOCs. You are now working as a data scientist, and did your past experience help you land that position? Maybe! Only he would know for sure.

But this is just a data point and the sample size is too small.

I recently went through a data engineering boot camp in San Francisco. From what I can see, past experience is important when it comes to data science positions or any IT-related position.

Out of 2 people with the same MOOCs and one has a 6-month internship as an analyst, who would you choose if you had to make a hiring decision?

One way you might think of would be to have MOOCs plus fierce competition on Kaggle. Another way would be to combine those MOOCs with a bunch of brilliant and smart projects on your GitHub repository.

When I was in data engineering training camp, one of my classmates has over 20 years of experience at all levels of software development in different domains. He also has a keen interest in data science, which is why he regularly searches for data science related material on Google. Who would not?

Guess what? Google regularly pulls all your browsing information and this shouldn't surprise you. One day Google approached him for a data science position without him ever approaching Google.

I also learn from him that Udemy also regularly reaches out to those outstanding students in the MOOC courses it offers. Recruiters go through Udemy to get to those hot spots. So, you are the judge!

Someone with a Ph.D. in a quantitative field? Why bother being a data scientist? You can walk away with loads of money and retire early if you choose to be a quant, but it is a very difficult and competitive field and it is not for everyone.

In all seriousness, if you have a Ph.D. In a quantitative field, these people would give you the love and attention that no friend (boy / girl) can come close to giving you. You are a gold mine! They will be delighted to have you as a data scientist.

I have two perspectives to offer here:

Perspective n. # 1: Coursera is the reason I got my first job in technology.

After college, my first career was in music performance and sound design. While I was studying computer science and psychology, music was my passion. However, at one point I realized that business models in the music industry were completely broken and that achieving success as a performer is basically like winning the lottery; even some of the most talented musicians in the world are surviving.

When I needed to make a career change, I took a Coursera course in Social Media Analytics (tau

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I have two perspectives to offer here:

Perspective n. # 1: Coursera is the reason I got my first job in technology.

After college, my first career was in music performance and sound design. While I was studying computer science and psychology, music was my passion. However, at one point I realized that business models in the music industry were completely broken and that achieving success as a performer is basically like winning the lottery; even some of the most talented musicians in the world are surviving.

When I needed to make a career change, I took a Coursera course in Social Media Analytics (taught by Lada Adamic at the University of Michigan). I attended a conference on social media analytics and ended up chatting with John Kelly, the CEO of a social data startup (now called Graphika). He suggested we have coffee and a few weeks later I was hired.

My liberal arts education at Sarah Lawrence College contributed greatly to my skills for the job, a hybrid role that had me in sales, data analytics, and ultimately led me into product management. But it was my fluency with network analysis that really sealed the deal, a skill set that I fully acquired from taking that Coursera class. I have now built a successful career in technology and lead a team in a major non-profit organization.

Which brings me to ...

Perspective n. # 2: As a hiring manager, Coursera credentials would not sway me.

I will speak quite frankly on this point. I don't give much weight to the credentials or certifications that someone puts on their resume outside of their formal education and work experience.

Real world industry experience is one of the most valuable things to me when adding someone to my team. There is a different kind of problem solving that develops when working on real challenges with the most up-to-date technologies. They don't really teach that in online courses. Experience with multiple different frameworks is always the best. Basically, overspecialization only makes sense if you want to be a Salesforce developer (even then, heaven will help you whenever Salesforce finally collapses under its own weight).

Second to industry experience, a candidate's formal education gives me a lot of information about them. Did they end up working on the degree they got? If not, does that grade inform your thinking in a way that can help you in your role?

Take a Coursera course: it depends on the person. Maybe you are like me and you are totally obsessed with the idea of ​​interconnecting networks of human interaction. Perhaps you were watching television while you were taking the course. Maybe you went through it, got a certification, and then immediately forgot all about it. It gives me some information on who that person is, but I can't necessarily trust that they have become an expert in that field unless it has been a multi-year process to acquire those credentials (such as a job or time spent in a accredited company University).

tl; dr: You need to take online courses to learn something new and / or acquire a skill, not to add a line to your resume.

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