What is the best language available to get a job in the information technology field?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Katie Meyers



What is the best language available to get a job in the information technology field?

No other restrictions, probably Java

Since my answer has started to catch on, I think I should explain myself

Java is by far the most portable language and is a very popular skill. However, in my opinion it is an ugly and awkward language that is designed around C ++ but focused on the virtual machine concept, which provides its portability.

Java was designed in the heyday of object-oriented languages. Its design principles do not mention typing, but it is still very strongly typed, to the point that a simple "Hello world!" The program will require the declaration of a cl

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No other restrictions, probably Java

Since my answer has started to catch on, I think I should explain myself

Java is by far the most portable language and is a very popular skill. However, in my opinion it is an ugly and awkward language that is designed around C ++ but focused on the virtual machine concept, which provides its portability.

Java was designed in the heyday of object-oriented languages. Its design principles do not mention typing, but it is still very strongly typed, to the point that a simple "Hello world!" The program will require the declaration of a class, its constructor, and the calling code.

Modern languages ​​are moving away from the “everything is an object” style like Java or Ruby, to allow much more flexibility. Perl 6 is the latest language that allows imperative, declarative, functional, and object-oriented solution styles in a single program. But it's too early to consider it for a new project, and the status quo still favors Java

If you have a particular market in mind, or would allow what you already know to influence your career path, things get more complex. Web programming requires extraordinary experience, and you will need to be familiar with at least JavaScript, CSS, and HTML, as well as have a working knowledge of the dozen or so popular web browsers and how you should alter their code so that their layout displays similarly. in all of them

If you are inexperienced at writing software and just feel that it is an easy way to make a quick buck, then you have been misled. Writing software is very difficult to do well and you need to be able to think clearly analytically in order to create anything worthwhile.

It is also useless to know a single language in isolation. Once you've written, say, a C program, you'll need to compile, link, and run it. For that, you will need to know bash on Linux or cmd on Windows from the inside out. They are not trivial either

A program that runs in isolation is rarely useful, and you will most likely need your C program to communicate with another program, perhaps over the LAN or the Internet, when you need to learn the proper API. You will probably also need to access a database, which will need a deep knowledge of SQL

So, let's go back to Java, which will allow you to write an Android application as well as being a useful skill for many other platforms. You will also need XML to describe your Android screens, and you will need to learn the Java Android API calls so that you can make the device do something

So yes, probably Java. But your question is very naive

Gone are the golden days of the IT industry, when even knowing a, b, c, d ... of any computer language would turn you into hotcakes. Having seen many ups and downs, all industries, including the IT industry, have matured a lot, both in terms of business sense and sustainability. No one can guarantee that learning a specific computer language would be your best option for landing a job with an IT company.

Now this is the age of multitasking and experienced flexibility. You must be a leading expert in the domain of your choice, or you must be flexible enough to adapt to business needs.

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Gone are the golden days of the IT industry, when even knowing a, b, c, d ... of any computer language would turn you into hotcakes. Having seen many ups and downs, all industries, including the IT industry, have matured a lot, both in terms of business sense and sustainability. No one can guarantee that learning a specific computer language would be your best option for landing a job with an IT company.

Now this is the age of multitasking and experienced flexibility. It must be a leading expert in the field of its choice or it must be flexible enough to adapt to the needs of the company when necessary. That requires that one be a quick, understanding and energetic learner (not easily tired or bored with their tasks, etc.), adapt according to the needs of the business.

Therefore, before deciding in which language, you should focus on the type of IT companies you want to work with and what their business domain is. You should focus more on whether you are targeting large multinationals that have many enterprise-level projects and services, or small start-ups or mid-range companies.

Then, based on your preference, you can choose a language and frameworks / technologies that are in demand in that sector. And considering the cost reduction measures preferred in the Industry, it would be a good idea to opt for Open-Source technologies, although Microsoft's platform, Frameworks, Tools and Technologies are also in demand.

Nor has he listed his previous exposure to computer programming and academic training. But to be on the safe side, some of the skills that are in relatively high demand are: IoT (Internet of Things), mobile apps, Big Data (Hadoop, etc.), and obviously enterprise-grade web apps.

So yes, Java Language along with SQL / databases (MySQL / Oracle) and some frameworks (Spring / Hibernate etc) could be a good choice to start on open source systems because it could meet the minimum requirements for great part of the labor market.

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