What is the best course to move from a civil engineer to the IT field?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Nixon Lowery



What is the best course to move from a civil engineer to the IT field?

There are basically no specific courses in IT for Civil Engineers., If you want to get into IT jobs, you have to learn programming languages ​​or databases or networks or ERP like SAP, Oracle etc, so try to get an idea about these courses, you have to do a lot of homework, talk to well-known people and then choose what is right for you, learn and practice thoroughly, gain confidence and then look for work, initially look for learning and gain experience, then you will have your own ideas to move on ... So remember that nothing will come easily to you unless you do a lot of hard work. What co

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There are basically no specific courses in IT for Civil Engineers., If you want to get into IT jobs, you have to learn programming languages ​​or databases or networks or ERP like SAP, Oracle etc, so try to get an idea about these courses, you have to do a lot of homework, talk to well-known people and then choose what is right for you, learn and practice thoroughly, gain confidence and then look for work, initially look for learning and gain experience, then you will have your own ideas to move on ... So remember that nothing will come easily to you unless you do a lot of hard work. Which course you should choose is up to you, do a little research, talk to people, get an idea and then choose the appropriate course that suits you ...

If you are looking for a job in IT sector and you are a civil engineer, I will suggest that you learn software that is used in civil engineering such as AUTOCAD (for drafting), STAAD PRO (for design and analysis), PREMAVERA (for construction management). ), REVIT (for building information modeling), ARCGIS (for surveying) and many more. Learn this software, work with some experienced people. After gaining enough knowledge and experience, start yours. You may be in better shape compared to IT work.

You should check with your school's student advisers. No one here can advise you on the best way to make the change, as no one here really cares what the change process is for their particular school. Go to the office and ask your guidance counselor.

Well, wouldn't you know? A question tailored for me.

Which field is better: IT or civil engineering?

Hard to answer in all honesty, but I'll take you through my experiences so far and let you decide.

I graduated as a civil engineer from the University of Manchester and worked as an engineer for various companies in the UK before switching to IT, around the turn of the century (I've always wanted to say that).

Probably it must be said that I ended up studying Civil Engineering by default and the reason is that, when I turned 16, I had no idea what I wanted.

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Well, wouldn't you know? A question tailored for me.

Which field is better: IT or civil engineering?

Hard to answer in all honesty, but I'll take you through my experiences so far and let you decide.

I graduated as a civil engineer from the University of Manchester and worked as an engineer for various companies in the UK before switching to IT, around the turn of the century (I've always wanted to say that).

Probably it must be said that I ended up studying Civil Engineering by default and the reason is that, when I turned 16, I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life. I knew that my dreams of becoming a professional athlete were out the window, as was my dream of becoming an astronaut. I was passionate about astronomy, so I sought to pursue a path to astrophysics. My A-Levels were Math, Physics, Biology, and Art, and when I got the grades 2 years later, that was the course I set out on.

I vividly remember speaking with my career counseling representative and when I told him that I wanted to pursue astronomy, he advised me against it. He said, and these were more or less his words, astronomy was a very poorly paid research job that incurred an incredible amount of selfless dedication to study for very little reward. Furthermore, the course was extremely difficult and the dropout rate was high and even if it reached the end, the chances of obtaining a residency anywhere would be very slim. I must choose an alternative science degree that offers steady progression. - Those were his words and, to be honest, quite wise although a bit boring.

Having said that, I almost ignored his advice and followed him anyway, but something about those words echoed in the back of my head. At 18, did you really want to study for almost 5 years and end up with little or no money or worse, no job? Not really, so I opted for Civil Engineering. My sister was (and still is) a civil engineer (program manager) and my dad was also a civil engineer, so I guess I followed the family tradition.

3-4 years later, I was out and about working for a major civil engineering firm, cutting my teeth in high-visibility jackets and a helmet on the spot. Several work moves later and climbing the ladder (mostly in Roads and Construction), I started to get very bored with work. It was monotonous and I would often find myself looking up at the sky and wondering what could have been ...

It was around this point that they broke my leg to pieces playing rugby and had to insert an artificial ankle joint. Due to the nature of the injury and the fact that I now had a permanent limp, my days of managing the site were over. I couldn't move across the uneven terrain without pain, so what was already becoming tedious work became even worse because on-site work was the only thing I liked. I enjoyed the jokes with the workers and loved being outside. Being confined to an office did not fill me with unbridled joy.

I decided to seek an alternative career. Astronomy just wasn't an option at 32, so I looked to YOU. Honestly, I didn't feel like another 3 years studying for a Computer Science degree, so I looked for other avenues that I could follow more quickly. I decided to qualify for the Microsoft and Cisco certifications and pass them in about 6 months. I had already decided that I wanted to focus on networking, as that was the side of IT that interested me. The problem, however, was that I had no experience, so I had to start from the bottom rung.

My first job at 32 was desk support, and while it was exciting at first (because it was a new adventure), it soon became monotonous, especially when it came to knuckle-headed employees. I glued it 6 months before applying elsewhere.

Then I got a position as a network engineer, working directly with a guy who was amazing. He was over 50 years old and what I learned from him has been of great use to me to this day. His knowledge of network security was amazing. Make no mistake here, I'd like to think I'm reasonably smart and a quick study with technical wizardry, but this guy left me for dead. Don't get me wrong, I had no tangible experience at this point, so I wasn't expecting to be able to perform miracles in networking, but the granular level of detail this guy could work out to identify problems was astounding. His attention to detail and principle KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) is my mantra now.

A couple of years later, I was offered an IT Manager position in Dubai for an oil company based in Jebel Ali. At this point, I was in doubt about taking it because I enjoyed my role in the network and worked well with my boss. He, however, told me to take it because he said, "If you stand still, you stop and it is too good an opportunity to turn it down." So I did and worked for several years in the Middle East (for two companies).

When I came back I was 40 years old and all of a sudden the company I work for called me on the phone and asked if I was interested in an interview for an expansive senior networking position. It wasn't the management (which I wasn't particularly concerned about) and it wasn't paying anything close to what I was earning in the Middle East (no surprises there), but the scope of work seemed excellent. Not only would I be responsible for the company's internal network infrastructure, I would also be responsible for designing the network infrastructure for our customers' solutions.

The industry I work in is quite specialized. We design bespoke solutions for airports and airlines around the world and then install the infrastructure wherever it is (and we have facilities on almost every continent). In the past 12 months, I have given up my internal IT responsibilities to become a solution architect focused solely on delivering solutions to the customer. This includes many trips around the world and while it may seem incredibly exotic, it actually isn't. But he takes me out of the office regularly and gives the wife a break from me, so all is well.

So which is better: IT or civil engineering?

I guess that depends on what you are passionate about, your perspective and what you consider important in life and in your vocation.

Would you have been happier if you had stayed in Civil Engineering?

I do not know. What I do know is that until I broke my leg, which forced the problem a bit, I was restless due to the tedium of work. I could have changed jobs within Civils, headed down a more project-oriented route, or gone to work abroad (the Middle East, for example), but would I have if I had remained an engineer (instead of jumping into IT? )? Probably not.

Do I regret leaving Civil Engineering?

No. I miss working outdoors and the jokes that went hand in hand with working on site, but now I feel more challenged and, although I tire of my current job, it is immensely more rewarding than any I've ever had in Civil's, and on the positive side, I can travel the world.

Which field is better?

That is speculative for the individual. It depends on what you want to do and your strengths. They both have a myriad of avenues to explore or specialize within their industries (IT especially), and it will depend on where you look at it. Both routes offer incredibly complex jobs that demand ridiculous levels of intelligence (structural design / fluid mechanics and network / safety design) and both offer easier and more accessible jobs (Site / Construction Engineer - Desk Engineer / ITEngineer).

In hindsight, would you choose IT or Civil Engineering again?

No, but let me explain. Hindsight is a wonderful thing to analyze mistakes and the only problem I have is that in certain aspects of life, you cannot benefit from it. If you buy a car and it continually breaks down, you just don't buy the same model again. With a career, you often don't have that opportunity because once you have trained in something, you are often stuck because when you realize that the career is not for you, it is too late. I was lucky, but still, I wouldn't choose IT (or Civil's) if I had my time again.

Knowing what I know now and what my passions are, I would pursue a career in aviation (pilot) or some form of ocean-based vocation. I love being at sea and a job as a skipper or in marine biology would probably do me good down to the ground. The simple fact is, if you're not passionate about what you do, life can become a miserable routine. So take the time to do your research and choose your career path carefully.

If you think that Civil Engineering is not your thing, leave it as I did. Don't waste time if your passion is elsewhere. However, if you are determined to succeed and have the intelligence to complete your higher education, civil engineering is the best profession to be in.

The reason I say this is because there is a surplus demand for civil engineers, and it will be as long as humanity survives. In IT, you know what the situation is like, either you are disqualified or your work is automated to the point where layoffs are daily news. Okay, the pay is good initially and growth is much faster if p

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If you think that Civil Engineering is not your thing, leave it as I did. Don't waste time if your passion is elsewhere. However, if you are determined to succeed and have the intelligence to complete your higher education, civil engineering is the best profession to be in.

The reason I say this is because there is a surplus demand for civil engineers, and it will be as long as humanity survives. In IT, you know what the situation is like, either you are disqualified or your work is automated to the point where layoffs are daily news. Okay, the pay is good initially and the growth is much faster if you play well. But Civil is, in my opinion, the long-term winner. Plus, you get the satisfaction of doing something concrete (excuse the pun) and not just creating random code in the virtual world that anyone else can easily do.

Yes, the first few years will be more difficult unless you are in the best construction companies, but all that experience will allow you to multiply your salary and outperform your IT peers for years to come. You will need to make sure you learn as much as possible and always keep your resume up to date, learning as many skills on the job. Trust me, companies will pay through the roof (pun intended) to hire you. (First hand experience).

Another route that is more difficult but faster, postgraduate, specializing in the fields that you think will do you very well, such as structural design, quantity measurement, construction management, etc. Your life will be ready!

First of all, let me tell you this. There is no such thing as THE BEST PG COURSE for civil engineers.

You have to get the most out of it.

Anyway, I will tell you a few institutes where you can pursue a postgraduate degree after a degree in civil engineering.

Higher studies in civil engineering (in INDIA).

1. If you want to improve your knowledge of the technical aspects of construction, choose M.Tech.

Prepare well for GATE, enter IIT or NIT.

You have several options like

a. M.Tech - Structural Engineering,

BMTech - Geotechnical Engineering

CMTech - Water Resources Engineering

DMTech - Transportation

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First of all, let me tell you this. There is no such thing as THE BEST PG COURSE for civil engineers.

You have to get the most out of it.

Anyway, I will tell you a few institutes where you can pursue a postgraduate degree after a degree in civil engineering.

Higher studies in civil engineering (in INDIA).

1. If you want to improve your knowledge of the technical aspects of construction, choose M.Tech.

Prepare well for GATE, enter IIT or NIT.

You have several options like

a. M.Tech - Structural Engineering,

BMTech - Geotechnical Engineering

CMTech - Water Resources Engineering

DMTech - Transportation Engineering, etc.

2. If you want to improve your knowledge in the management aspects of construction, opt for the Project Management / Construction courses.

You get a white collar job with a decent salary after completing these programs.

Some colleges are listed below where you can pursue construction / project management.

Construction Technology and Management Course -IIT Delhi

The Construction Technology and Management course -IIT Delhi gives more weight to the Technical Aspects of Construction.

National Institute of Industrial Engineering (NITIE) - Mumbai

The National Institute of Industrial Engineering is one of the best B schools in India, located in Powai near Lake Vihar in Mumbai, India.

It offers various programs such as:

Postgraduate Diploma in PROJECT MANAGEMENT (PGDPM)

Postgraduate Diploma in Industrial Management (PGDIM)

These courses are accredited as equivalent to MBA by UGC (University Scholarship Commission)

National Institute for Construction Research and Management

Programs offered from Pune, Hyderabad, Goa and Indore. Visit their website for more details.

NICMAR gives more weight to the managerial aspects of construction.

(Most expensive option of all: D)

RICS School of Built Environment, Amity University (UGC Approved)

Established in early 2013 as an industry-led initiative, it has the support of leading employers and the Ministry of Urban Development.

It offers various programs such as:

MBA in Real Estate and Urban Infrastructure,

MBA in Construction Project Management,

MBA in Construction Economics and Quantity Survey,

MBA in Infrastructure Management, etc.

Global Institute for Construction Research and Management

This institute offers Postgraduate Diploma in some courses (approved by AICTE)

For more details, visit GICMAR (Global Institute for Construction Management and Research)

Maharashtra Institute of Technology - Pune

This institute offers a postgraduate diploma in construction and project management.

They are all equally good from a professional point of view.

Some institutes offer computer-aided programs for civil engineers. Civil engineers and architects are eligible for this course.

There are some more reputable institutions that offer similar courses.

3. Higher studies abroad: GRE, TOEFL, IELTS whatever.

(If you like your career to be more research-oriented, choose MS.) I don't have much idea about study and opportunities abroad.

4. If you are interested in urban planning or urban planning, there is an institute in Delhi (School of Planning and Architecture) that offers a graduate degree in various disciplines. Even this is a good option.

5. If you want to take a pure management course,

You can also try CAT with your engineering degree. If you are lucky, you can enter some IIM.

There are many other options. I just listed everything that came to mind.

YOU ARE THE BOSS. YOU CAN CHOOSE WHAT YOU WANT.

All the best :)

You can follow this topic to learn more.

Opportunities for Civil Engineers in India

Civil engineers are definitely underpaid and I think civil engineers are in the lowest paid company cart today. I have worked for several years in different firms and finally I trust to advise me not to opt for this profession. It is a hoax that civil engineers are well paid. One can compare it to the salaries of his batchmates in IT engineering firms, CSE, Mech and the truth will reveal itself.

The underlying reason for this type of situation is due to the lack of innovation in technology.

  1. The civil engineering sector is swarming with elderly people who are rel
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Civil engineers are definitely underpaid and I think civil engineers are in the lowest paid company cart today. I have worked for several years in different firms and finally I trust to advise me not to opt for this profession. It is a hoax that civil engineers are well paid. One can compare it to the salaries of his batchmates in IT engineering firms, CSE, Mech and the truth will reveal itself.

The underlying reason for this type of situation is due to the lack of innovation in technology.

  1. The civil engineering sector is crowded with older people who are reluctant to change as it would undermine their value in the company.
  2. The use of outdated technology in design and construction.
  3. Excessive dependence on software leading to the ruin of concepts.
  4. They don't care about your learning and thinking abilities outside of the box.
  5. The reputation of the graduating university does not matter. One would be matched to people who ranked lakhs on the engineering entrance exam ranks.
  6. Last but not least, the human factor that prevents you from growing at every step makes this branch worth abandoning.
  7. Now there is no job security in this sector.

I would rather suggest going to a simple graduation and then moving on to a good high school. In this way, one can easily use their energy to pursue a high-income career with a comparatively less smart and hectic job and relatively less frustration in life.

If someone is still very fond of Civil Engg. then he / she should focus on getting the engineering services exam pass as soon as possible or else the private sector would eventually let him believe he is useless.

Moving to the Gulf countries or abroad or obtaining higher education degree certificates would also not allow you to compete with other sectors.
In addition to the aforementioned detailed explanation of the prevailing situation. I would also like to add my answer to the fact that until you are good at negotiating skills and there is an urgent need on the part of a company, learning many different things in engineering will not earn you a decent salary or even promotions outside of turn. The current scenario is as if you had acquired the required skills in a relatively less time than everyone else, no one is going to consider it. They simply count the number of years while producing an offer, but during the time of the interview they would like to take a look and even hope that you will do all the jobs with the acquired skills.
The fun fact: for the most part, they only ask you the missing questions. So frankly, they are looking for a person who will do the hard work under their command (who are incompetent themselves) and pay less.
Better to be diplomatic and boot-licking. I have often witnessed these types of people rise above smart people. Hard work / smart work sucks.

It would not be a totally wrong decision to go from civil engineering to software engineering after two years of civilian experience. However, before making the decision, there are a few things to keep in mind.

  1. It would be difficult to pursue software engineering without previous studies and duties. Spend the first few months of the change or some time before the change to learn the basics. Join a training course or try to get a short-term diploma.
  2. Update your CV. Your CV and work experience should be strong enough to explain your change from civilian to software.
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It would not be a totally wrong decision to go from civil engineering to software engineering after two years of civilian experience. However, before making the decision, there are a few things to keep in mind.

  1. It would be difficult to pursue software engineering without previous studies and duties. Spend the first few months of the change or some time before the change to learn the basics. Join a training course or try to get a short-term diploma.
  2. Update your CV. Your CV and work experience should be strong enough to explain your change from civil engineering to software engineering. When applying for jobs, let them understand how you will try to use your developed math and programming skills in civil engineering for the common good of software engineering.
  3. After the change, it will start out as a fresco. The salary you were earning before may not be something you get after the change. Don't lose hope and remember that the ladder you are climbing will take you to new heights, but only with hard work and determination.
  4. Software engineering opens up many options abroad compared to civil engineering. After making the switch and mastering the skills, you can start exploring your options in other countries.

The software engineering workload will double. The field of civil engineering is huge and hires far more people than software. So you may have to face a few sleepless nights if the company you work for requires it. You can easily change fields and easily learn software engineering at upGrad. One of the best learning platforms.

You can choose it. I must say, I am a computer science student at LPU, so I want to inform you that Lovely professional University has its own placement team and also a government job preparation team, who guide students to secure a work package attractive in both sectors. Today, many students choose IT and other non-essential jobs as their full-time career options. One of the seniors also looked for LPU civil engineering graduates and during our recruiting season, he has witnessed various IT companies (namely Infosys, Wipro, TCS, etc.) that came to the LPU campus and they hired more than 200 new engineers.

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You can choose it. I must say, I am a computer science student at LPU, so I want to inform you that Lovely professional University has its own placement team and also a government job preparation team, who guide students to secure a work package attractive in both sectors. Today, many students choose IT and other non-essential jobs as their full-time career options. One of the seniors also looked for LPU civil engineering graduates and during our recruiting season, he witnessed several IT companies (namely Infosys, Wipro, TCS, etc.) that came to the LPU campus and hired over 200 new engineers. graduates of all kinds of branches. And the irony is that "most of the students who had been placed in these IT companies were from CSE, Civil, Mechanics and other branches." Even many of my relatives and elderly people are currently working there.

LPU teachers clarify every concept, from basic science to technology, with relevant practice through lab and projects to develop problem-solving skills while keeping industry requirements in place. Students will develop competencies in areas such as networking, web development, cloud computing, etc.

Since most large companies essentially train their new recruits internally, it makes perfect sense for them to recruit even civil engineers from better universities.

If you have a passion for something and once you gained some experience in it, then no one, I repeat, no one can stop you from doing that, and Lovely professional University will always support you at every moment if you want to grow your business, or want to go to a government job. , or go to the IT sector.

Yes!

I would like to classify the changers into two categories:
1. Who already knows what coding is (not the basics, like a pro)

2. Who is blank

1. For Civil Engineers who already know coding and failed to make it to the IT branch due to low rank or family issues, they can have an awesome CV doing projects in software and getting them open source on github and everyone like me yajnab ( Yajnavalkya Bandyopadhyay)

If you are willing to study and prepare for the GATE CS Paper, you can also go abroad and earn a master's degree in CSE. No GATE ISI Kolkata is a great institute that accepts w

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Yes!

I would like to classify the changers into two categories:
1. Who already knows what coding is (not the basics, like a pro)

2. Who is blank

1. For Civil Engineers who already know coding and failed to make it to the IT branch due to low rank or family issues, they can have an awesome CV doing projects in software and getting them open source on github and everyone like me yajnab ( Yajnavalkya Bandyopadhyay)

If you are willing to study and prepare for the GATE CS Paper, you can also go abroad and earn a master's degree in CSE. Without GATE ISI, Kolkata is a great institute that accepts with its admission test (although the test is not easy)

2. Who does not know what coding is: - It will be a serious problem for you, in this case I would advise a formal education, take some courses (online or offline), nano degrees and work hard in the studies of Engineering in Computer Science . . Take home studies, try to crack the tests from TCS, Cognizant and other consulting services (it will be difficult, but you will soon be able to overcome them).

But remember this could end your entire career, as when you do civil practice things can go wrong and you never meet the desired things that an IT industry looks for (not everyone is cut out for everything, and in the long run Civil engineering career gap could make it difficult for you to get a job.

Think three times before making a decision

Thanks for the A2A.

Building materials have many opportunities for civil engineers. Main responsibilities include: planning, directing and supervising large construction projects. Civil engineers act as leaders in these jobs and ensure that everything related to the project is safe, fluid, and structurally sound.

Also from a growth perspective, the demand for qualified civil engineers will never decrease worldwide as infrastructure projects, building construction, and much more structure will keep increasing and never stagnate.

I hope that helps.

The recommended computer-assisted course varies depending on the nature of your field of work.

But here are some of them;

  1. Auto cad
  2. Stadd Pro V8i,
  3. MS project,
  4. MS Office,
  5. Google SketchUp,
  6. Candy,
  7. Spring
  8. ERP
  9. SAP
  10. BIS.

Hope it helps you in your career.

All the best.

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