What is the best and worst question you have ever been asked in a job interview?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Isla Rose



What is the best and worst question you have ever been asked in a job interview?

worst: "Are you married?"

It is illegal to ask in the US (as far as I know), however, I was asked in interviews for two different companies. One of them hired me.

better: I don't have many "good" questions asked. Probably "what do you know about this company?" When the company in question was Konica-Minolta. The interviewer was surprised that I knew that Minolta used to be a camera company. (My dad used to take wedding photography and used his film cameras and equipment.)

The best question for me was tell me about yourself and the worst was convincing a vegetarian to eat chicken as forcing someone to not be a vegetarian is really unfair and very difficult too.

A Japanese multinational interviewed me (I can't reveal the name) and they asked me how many riddles I found interesting.

Question 1: There is a room in which there are 3 electric bulbs. The room has only one door and it is locked, which means there is no way to look in or enter the interior other than the door. Right outside the room there are 3 switches where each switch is connected to a light bulb. Now your question is that you are allowed to enter the room only once, so how can you determine which light bulb is connected to which switch?

Answer given by me:

Only on the first switch for 5 minutes

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A Japanese multinational interviewed me (I can't reveal the name) and they asked me how many riddles I found interesting.

Question 1: There is a room in which there are 3 electric bulbs. The room has only one door and it is locked, which means there is no way to look in or enter the interior other than the door. Right outside the room there are 3 switches where each switch is connected to a light bulb. Now your question is that you are allowed to enter the room only once, so how can you determine which light bulb is connected to which switch?

Answer given by me:

Just turn on the first switch for 5 minutes and then turn it off. Then just flip the second switch and walk into the room. Now the bulb that is connected with the second switch will light up and just check the remaining two bulbs by touching them, the one that is hot, the one that would be hot should connect with switch one and the remaining bulb will connect with the switch. third.

They also asked the number of puzzled as

Question 2: Divide a cake into 8 equal parts using only 3 knife cuts.

Answer given by me:

Just make two cuts vertically by dividing the cake into 4 equal parts (a cross) and make one cut horizontally that will divide the cake into 8 equal parts.

Another interview experience was with One US Company (Can't reveal the name), they even took a round especially for Puzzles ... There were some standard puzzles, some were easy and some were even the hardest to solve.

Question 3: You are given 1, 2, 6 and 7 with +, -, * and / how would you do 17 (You cannot repeat numbers and you cannot repeat operations, but you cannot skip one or more operations as you can only use +, - or +, -, *)

Answer :

(6-1) * 2 + 7

Question 4: You are given four 12,8,5 and 1 liter bowls. The 12-liter bowl is full of milk. How would you divide the milk between 4, 4 and 4 liters in 12.8 and 5-liter bowls?

Answer:

12 8 5 1

12 0 0 0 // Initially the 12-liter container is full

4 8 0 0 // pour 8 liters from a 12-liter bowl into an 8-liter bowl

4 3 5 0 // then the 5 liter bowl filled from the 8 liter bowl

4 3 4 1 // then pour 1 liter of 5 liters into a 1 liter container

4 4 4 0 // then pour 1 liter into an 8 liter bowl

Question 5: You are given 8 balls of identical appearance, one of which is heavier. You are also given a balance. How would you determine which ball is heavier with a minimum comparison number?

Answer:

Initially I told them that it would take 3 comparisons because if you divide the balls into groups of 4 and 4 and then the weights (1 Compare) you will end up with a group of 4 balls. Then divide again into 2 and 2, then compare (comparison 2) and then 1-1 (comparison 3). Then they asked me if there is any other way to optimize. I got stuck and started to think and answered that instead of making 2 groups we can make 3 groups of 3,3 and 2 and weigh 3 and 3 balls (1 Comparison) and then again in 3 Balls we make 3 groups of 1 ball each and weigh them (2 Comparison).

There were more riddles, even they not only asked this kind of riddles, but they also asked riddles related to programming languages, since I am from Computer Science and Interviewed for the position of Engineer.

Edit: As Pankaj pointed out, there was an ambiguity in the last question.

I was sitting with a candidate after three rounds of interviews and had good news. After evaluating all the candidates for the vacant position, we decided that she was the best of the group - we would like her to join our team. Congratulations. You are hired!

I love this part of the hiring process ... when I tell someone they got the job, almost everyone responds the same way: shock combined with joy, disbelief, and relief. No one wants to seem overly excited, and I find his attempts to appear "unflappable" quite endearing.

But with this candidate, I told her the good news (you got the job!) And I didn't get

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I was sitting with a candidate after three rounds of interviews and had good news. After evaluating all the candidates for the vacant position, we decided that she was the best of the group - we would like her to join our team. Congratulations. You are hired!

I love this part of the hiring process ... when I tell someone they got the job, almost everyone responds the same way: shock combined with joy, disbelief, and relief. No one wants to seem overly excited, and I find his attempts to appear "unflappable" quite endearing.

But with this candidate, I told her the good news (you got the job!) And got no reaction. No smile, no facial expression, no words, no nervousness. I seriously thought I had forgotten to say the words out loud.

So I tried again: “You are hired. We want you to start your new job here as soon as possible. "

I put an offer letter to him: “This is our formal offer to you. The salary and benefits we discuss are outlined in detail, and the second page outlines a couple of avenues for advancement, promotions, and our performance bonus program - you'll be eligible every six months. Any questions?"

….

Any. I couldn't read it at all. I spent a couple of hours with her during interviews, and she was fun, smart, talkative, and joyfully expressive during each of our meetings. There are no red flags from others who interacted with this candidate.

But now ... not even "lost in thought" vibes. There are no signs of "pausing to say the right thing." It's no big deal.

WTF?

So I asked him, “Do you want this job? Do you have a question or want to discuss something before accepting our offer? "

THEN AT LAST, SHE SPOKE:

"Yeah. So ... Right now, I'm just interviewing, doing job interviews, right? My mom ... I live at home, right? And she was like, 'Apply for some jobs or move.' And I said no. there was no job she wanted. And she told me she didn't need a job. I needed to get some interviews. So… I'm interviewing. Like, every week. So thank you? "

I didn't say anything, no witty, insightful, or instructive joke. No desecrated screams. I was not at a loss for words. I did not know what to do. He sat there for a couple of minutes (it felt like several hours), checking his phone.

Then he got up and left. Any. No thanks. I'm not sorry. No, nothing.

Speechless. It's one thing for a candidate to cool down first and fade away. Going all the way just to say "Just kidding!" not cool.

I have worked for about 10 companies and they have interviewed me about 30 times and these are the most common.

"Tell us about you"

This should be a short and tall overview of the package you are selling. for example: you.

“I have been doing software development in all fields for almost 20 years. My first experience with the software was at the age of 12 looking and putting sprites in my room and I have loved it ever since. "

"Where do you see yourself in 5 years?"

"Sitting in your chair" <- this is a funny one that I used to joke about until I was really old. Now i say

"Doing the same things that I have always done and loved"

I generally

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I have worked for about 10 companies and they have interviewed me about 30 times and these are the most common.

"Tell us about you"

This should be a short and tall overview of the package you are selling. for example: you.

“I have been doing software development in all fields for almost 20 years. My first experience with the software was at the age of 12 looking and putting sprites in my room and I have loved it ever since. "

"Where do you see yourself in 5 years?"

"Sitting in your chair" <- this is a funny one that I used to joke about until I was really old. Now i say

"Doing the same things that I have always done and loved"

Usually I expand on this because I hate political nonsense in my field. I am constantly approached to be a software administrator, but tbh, that's not my bag. First, for every 10 engineering positions there is 1 managerial position. Second, the longer you're away from software, the more those skills will atrophy. I've seen it over and over with managers. I don't want to be that guy. Practical coding is a must. Technical leadership is as high as I want to be at this point in my career.

"What is your greatest weakness?"

A coworker bragged about this one and it works but it's not honest to me so I only used it once. It's pretty good, but I generally give the latter because it seems more genuine.

"I am relentless" <- also works as a fortress

My answer is to be frank. I will continue in my field in any way, whether you hire me or not. "I am weak with algorithms." I usually expand on this by saying that I have coded technical documents before, but do not invert binary trees during my daily activities. It's silly to think that. I have also written a TON of KPIs for dashboards.

"What is your greatest strength?"

"I'm relentless" <- again. It can also work as a weakness, but I try to avoid this canned answer.

I generally state that in my field, I have a proven track record of adaptability and stay ahead of the curve in terms of technology.

"Do you have any question for me?"

Depending on the rounds of interviews, ask at least one question about what they envision you doing at their company. You need an idea of ​​their expectations of you there.

Ask about your tech stack.

How old is the base code?

Are you agile? waterfall?

release cycles?

Anything to understand your daily activities.

If you are in round 2 or 3 of the interview process and they ask this question again, I would say that all of your questions were answered by (insert name of previous interviewers) and anything else will be answered once you look under the hood .

"Why our company?"

This I rarely see unless it is a startup. If you "REALLY" want this startup, I hope you see a future with it and say it as such. For example: This looks amazing, and I imagine you guys are going to be the greyhound bus super or something. I only got this question early in my career. Today, you have to introduce me to your company. I've seen it all. Startup, Fortune 5, and anywhere in between. If you are really senior and in high demand, this question is rarely asked.

Beyond these questions, there will be technical questions related to your field. I've seen some crazy questions when opening a job for the first time. Avoid interviews if the position has just been opened and the company is medium in size. They will ask some stupid questions that no one knows, and then back off once no one can answer them. Usually after a week, they'll set the bar a little lower. Unfortunately, they usually pass a person who was a near-perfect fit and settle for someone mediocre just to fill the seat.

Just my observations.

It was an interview for my first executive position as vice president of engineering. This was about 10 years ago. The president of the company asked me: "What is the biggest mistake you have made in your role as manager and what did you learn from it?" I was not prepared for that question. I felt like a deer caught by the headlights of an oncoming car. I sat there thinking.

And I hope.

I kept thinking, and my mind could only think of one story. One that he didn't want to tell.

And I hope. He offered me no other word that could ease me.

A total of four or five minutes (an eternity!)

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It was an interview for my first executive position as vice president of engineering. This was about 10 years ago. The president of the company asked me: "What is the biggest mistake you have made in your role as manager and what did you learn from it?" I was not prepared for that question. I felt like a deer caught by the headlights of an oncoming car. I sat there thinking.

And I hope.

I kept thinking, and my mind could only think of one story. One that he didn't want to tell.

And I hope. He offered me no other word that could ease me.

Four or five minutes passed (an eternity!) Without either of them saying anything.

He kept waiting, looking at me.

Finally, for want of something else, I told him about the time when I trusted a subordinate (my direct report) who was in charge of a department 500 miles from where my office was located. I trusted the reports of this manager. Trust their budgets. I trusted their integrity. And so I basically stayed out of her hair, for the most part. I visited their facility twice a year, sometimes more frequently, based on certain key milestones.

I thought everything was going well, for a full three years, until my administrative assistant came to see me after visiting the other facilities to receive the training I needed. While there, he heard my voice over telecommunications in a nearby conference room. He walked over to see what the meeting was about. Since I normally attended my meetings and took notes and actions, this was appropriate. But she stayed behind the wall, out of sight.

She told me that the phone had been silenced and that her manager (my direct report) was making fun of everything I said. The conference room was in stitches, laughing at the manager as he taunted me. I had no idea this was happening. I honestly wanted to die and I didn't want to tell the president that a direct report disrespected me and that he had no idea.

Then he said, “And then? You learned?"

I told him that I would never blindly trust again. He smiled. The interview ended. A week later, I got the job.

You have reached the last 5 to 10 minutes of the job interview and the interviewer says "Do you have any questions for me?" If you say no, you are missing the easiest way to make an unforgettable impression. You want to be unforgettable right?

An interview is about connecting with people, the company, the job, and you. You absolutely should ask questions at the end of the interview, but some questions are better than others.

Impact - Ask how it will have an impact here. Companies want to hire those who want to own the problems, not cause them or walk away. Get excited about it

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You have reached the last 5 to 10 minutes of the job interview and the interviewer says "Do you have any questions for me?" If you say no, you are missing the easiest way to make an unforgettable impression. You want to be unforgettable right?

An interview is about connecting with people, the company, the job, and you. You absolutely should ask questions at the end of the interview, but some questions are better than others.

Impact - Ask how it will have an impact here. Companies want to hire those who want to own the problems, not cause them or walk away. Go ahead and solve their problems and they will not be able to resist at least considering you and the ideas you can contribute.

Growth: Visualize yourself in the company and, more importantly, have the interviewer visualize you in the company. Managers want to hire people who will grow, not back down, so demonstrate the ability to do so. Identify areas of opportunity that you will continue to work on, but also trust your strengths enough to show them front and center. Don't forget to be humble.

Your experience: people like to talk about themselves. Find out why your interviewer joined the company and not others, why this team, and what their career path has been like. Make your interviewer open up about himself and state what matters to him.

People - Learn what the team composition looks like, what their background is, why they joined, what motivates them to do this job every day, and if you have a chance to network with a current employee using this question, bonus points for you .

The plan for the next X years: ask questions about the future and include yourself in the question. “This sounds like a great opportunity and I am happy that I was able to chat. What will the next 2-3 years be like? What are the goals? "Companies want to know that you are involved in the long term. Not only because it is very expensive to replace, but hiring and recruiting is difficult. Especially hiring good and talented people. If you are one of those people, companies will do their best to keep you. and others will do their best to woo you.You want to be that person.

What does an ideal candidate for this position look like? - This is one of my favorite questions because it helps you position yourself as the right employee, IF you do it right. When you ask this, the interviewer will likely go over what is important to have or know for this position, and here's a pro tip: the things they say first are probably the most important (most of the time). If you hear something that you do not have, now you have the opportunity to give an answer on how you will learn it. If they mention something that you do have, it's a great opportunity to remind them that you are skilled in that area.

Can I tell you more about me? - This is a great question to give your interviewer a chance to ask you directly and frankly about any concerns you may have. This gives you the opportunity to address those concerns.

Mission: Align with the mission of the company by telling a story. For example, I joined Facebook before other big tech companies because I felt personally connected to the mission. My mom uses almost all Facebook products to stay connected with family and long distance friends. Why does this matter to me? She is also my dad's main caregiver and without Facebook, she would find it difficult to connect, smile, and most importantly find happiness thanks to family.

Asking all of these questions is a surefire way to help others think about you more, but as Andy mentioned, it will also help you know if the opportunity is right for you.

I should mention beforehand that at the stage of my life when I had this interview, I was newly married. Usually I look younger than my age and had already received my bachelor's degree. At the time, I had always been in the habit of removing my wedding ring before an interview, but this time I forgot to do it.

I was interviewing for a position in the county next to the one I currently lived in. I think the position had something to do with coordinating the staff and keeping the schedule. Being that I am a very analytical and strategic individual, I could have been very good at

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I should mention beforehand that at the stage of my life when I had this interview, I was newly married. Usually I look younger than my age and had already received my bachelor's degree. At the time, I had always been in the habit of removing my wedding ring before an interview, but this time I forgot to do it.

I was interviewing for a position in the county next to the one I currently lived in. I think the position had something to do with coordinating the staff and keeping the schedule. Being that I am a very analytical and strategic person, I could have been very good at this job. However, it wasn't long after entering the interview that I knew that this particular organization would not be a good fit for me.

Going into the interview, I couldn't help but notice that literally all of the staff members were at least twice my size, and they were all female. Given that I was already a bit overweight at the time (I was 5'4 ″ and about 160 pounds), the fact that I had stuck out like a sore thumb in that regard already worried me. Throughout the interview, it started with the boss asking me just the basic interview questions, which I handled pretty well.

Moving on to the interview, I suspect she noticed my ring, as well as my relatively young face and slightly plump figure at the time. The next thing he asked I was completely surprised. She mentioned that they were looking for someone who was interested in a long-term position (and I was at the time), and then she had the audacity to ask me if I was pregnant. Let me be clear in saying that I have never been pregnant and do not plan to have children in the foreseeable future. I was completely taken aback by the question and ended up spitting out some answer that hopefully pleased them.

To this day, I'm not sure if they made assumptions about my maternity status because of my age, or my marital status, or what. However, I knew from that moment on that I would never be paid enough to work with a group of intrusive and ignorant women like that. Looking back, you should have reported this to whoever handles discrimination cases. I learned from that experience that I had to be prepared to answer questions that might seem discriminatory in nature.

These are the most important questions posed by HR:

1. Tell me about yourself / let me know your summary.

Answer: Give a short introduction about yourself, your blog, your department, your family, your education, your accomplishments, your hobbies, and your STRENGTHS!

2. What are your strengths and weaknesses?

Answer: Remind us of the qualities that adapt to the needs of companies. for example, coordination, leadership, organizational skills, critical skills, etc.

Speaking of your vulnerability, project your weakness as your power. For example, boy. Tell them you're going to be late while you're looking for p

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These are the most important questions posed by HR:

1. Tell me about yourself / let me know your summary.

Answer: Give a short introduction about yourself, your blog, your department, your family, your education, your accomplishments, your hobbies, and your STRENGTHS!

2. What are your strengths and weaknesses?

Answer: Remind us of the qualities that adapt to the needs of companies. for example, coordination, leadership, organizational skills, critical skills, etc.

Speaking of your vulnerability, project your weakness as your power. For example, boy. Tell them you're going to be late while you're looking for perfection, but somehow you get the job done right! But that's a silver lining. You should even reassure them that you are a very compassionate person and that you cannot quickly say "no" to people when they ask for your support.

3. Why should we hire you?

Answer: This is where you need to be careful. If they want to hire you, you must match their expectations for their profile. Therefore, tell them all the possible positive qualities in you that fit their needs. For example, tell them that “My technical skills are closely related to the profile you are interviewing me for,” and quote this with strong support such as your CGPA. You can also tell them that you are a very strong and flexible person and that you would work under pressure very easily, so it would be very important to work in a professional environment.

4. How do you see yourself in 5 years?

Answer: This is somewhat complicated. Because the interviewer does not want to know what you are going to be, he just wants to see how long you are going to be with him and also to see if you have a clear idea of ​​your future and professional career. So, don't go on saying that you want to be the CEO of a company or tell them that you would like to go to higher education (because they don't want you to leave the company soon). Just tell them that you would like to learn more from your teammates and improve your skills and occupy a high-level position in your company.

5. Do you have any questions for us?

Answer: This is the most difficult question. Most people end up answering "No." But the interviewer doesn't want a candidate who just nods at everything. You want a candidate who is more interactive and interested in the company. So obviously I would expect you to ask him something. Don't ask him about the salary structure or hierarchy of the company (that would be a bit offensive). It is better to ask simple questions like "where would my place of publication / training be", etc.

Suggestions: Avoid the word "if" and replace it with "when". Because the word if and when can mean the same thing but "if" you doubt it and when you have confidence.

My post will fall into the Stranger / Stranger Questions category.

This interview of mine happened with TCS in 2011 and it was my first interview for a job. After passing the written test, he was scheduled to give a technical round of interview.

I went into the booth and handed him my resume. He took a look at my resume and threw up the question that completely stunned me.

Interviewer - Give a 5 minute speech about Anna Hazare.

And my reaction was

Since this was a technical round, I thought you would ask me questions about C, C ++, Java, SO, or Networking Question. It took me a while to wake up from the

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My post will fall into the Stranger / Stranger Questions category.

This interview of mine happened with TCS in 2011 and it was my first interview for a job. After passing the written test, he was scheduled to give a technical round of interview.

I went into the booth and handed him my resume. He took a look at my resume and threw up the question that completely stunned me.

Interviewer - Give a 5 minute speech about Anna Hazare.

And my reaction was

Since this was a technical round, I thought you would ask me questions about C, C ++, Java, SO, or Networking Question. It took me a while to wake up from that commotion and I spoke a little about it. The answer infuriated him and now the question has moved on to my communication skills. He scolded me for 5 more minutes than studying in a convent school and still having poor English.

Then he asked me "Do you smoke?" To which I hesitantly replied "Yes" and this triggered a further 5 minute lecture on smoking and how it will affect my work.

After the warning, he gave me a program to print numbers from 1 to 10.

And my reaction was "You really ask an engineer for a technical round." I wrote the show, but felt that it was against my dignity to write that show. At this point it was clear to me that I am not going to get this job.

I really wanted to take my resume and get out of there (like Sharman Joshi in 3 Idiots).

RESULT - Rejected.

This happened to me at my off-campus job interview at wipro.

Now it was my turn and it was around 12:35 am (Nov 9, 2015) and I was completely exhausted after clearing

All rounds of GD and aptitude testing.

I was waiting for this since 9:00 am (November 8, 2016)


I entered the room and greeted the interviewer "Good morning" sir (That guy
looked at me harshly)


Interviewer: Sit Harsh


Me: thank you sir


Interviewer: He asked me about my project from last year and some other technical things from my field (ohhh, I forgot to tell you that I was studying Engineering in Electronics and Communications).


Everything was fine until

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This happened to me at my off-campus job interview at wipro.

Now it was my turn and it was around 12:35 am (Nov 9, 2015) and I was completely exhausted after clearing

All rounds of GD and aptitude testing.

I was waiting for this since 9:00 am (November 8, 2016)


I entered the room and greeted the interviewer "Good morning" sir (That guy
looked at me harshly)


Interviewer: Sit Harsh


Me: thank you sir


Interviewer: He asked me about my project from last year and some other technical things from my field (ohhh, I forgot to tell you that I was studying Engineering in Electronics and Communications).


Everything was fine so far.


Interviewer: GET OUT (I mean, what is this guy throwing at me?)


Entrevistador: quédese afuera cuando lo llame y luego solo entre


Pasaron casi 5 minutos, sabía la hora perfectamente porque cada minuto para mí era como una hora.


Entonces sonó el timbre y el peón me llamó.


Interviewer : Harsh , come in
Have a sit.Tell me what's the difference in the room now after 5 mins then it was before.
( At this moment I was dumbstruck,i was like what this person is asking me)

IN MY MIND : I checked the desk minutely, I scanned the wall ,looked at the papers scattered haphazardly on the table ..
Then after checking all the things properly i answered

Me : Sir, before I went out the wall clock showed the time 12:47 am (it was a digital one so I know exact timing) and now it's showing 12:56 am, it's the only difference I spot here.

Interviewer: ( a professional smile )
Thank-you harsh you may go now

Me: Thank you, Sir ( ohhhhh my god the butterflies just stopped in my belly)

Result : Got Selected

I was going for a job writing video software so of course I was asked the question “Why are manhole covers round?”

I gave the usual answers: they are round because they can be rolled instead of carried and won’t fall in the hole. Then I added one of my own: round shapes are stronger than square shapes. That flummoxed the interviewer which, in turn, flummoxed me. It was an engineering company so I thought, you know, just on the off chance, they might know basic engineering.

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