What is something no one knows about applying for jobs?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Mason Griffiths



What is something no one knows about applying for jobs?

What I think a lot of people know, but what nobody talks about when giving advice on how to find work, is that there is no one way to find work. There is no right or perfect resume, there is no formula for an interview that will always get you a job, and no technique will work all the time for everyone.

Too often, advice is given to people based on formulas and job seekers are frustrated because they use this single approach. As resume writers, they contact me to tell me that they can't get a job because they don't have the right keywords to get through the recruitment software, but when I look

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What I think a lot of people know, but what nobody talks about when giving advice on how to find work, is that there is no one way to find work. There is no right or perfect resume, there is no formula for an interview that will always get you a job, and no technique will work all the time for everyone.

Too often, advice is given to people based on formulas and job seekers are frustrated because they use this single approach. As resume writers, they contact me to tell me that they can't get a job because they don't have the right keywords to get past the screening software, but when I look at their resume, it's because it's unreadable garbage. Other times, "experts" have told people that your resume is fine. But once I fix it, they start getting interviews.

Even my own formulas for writing resumes are often incorrect at times, due to the particular needs of the person and the job they are seeking. On the other hand, I can look at a resume and think it's silly, there's no way they can get the job with their qualifications and experience, and the resume seems silly too. Guess what, I was wrong, they were applying for a job in a region where few qualified people go. So he got the job easily with his poorly written resume.

Basically, there is a lot of good advice, but it will never work all the time. Many people know it, but nobody wants to admit it.

What is something no one knows about applying for jobs?

One thing that apparently no one other than the recruiters knows is that sometimes there is an internal candidate that they had in mind all along. Job posting is sometimes tailored to that person's skill mix, and it's that person's job to lose.

You have finally made it. You have found your dream job and can't wait to apply. You know that you will be absolutely perfect for it; He has all the appropriate qualifications and experience and has spent the entire day preparing a job application along with a cover letter that deserves a literary award. You're just seconds away from submitting the request. Do not do it! Take a moment to go over the job application one more time to make sure you've avoided the common mistakes thousands of applicants make on their applications. Your resume ends up on the no pile and your dream job rem

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You have finally made it. You have found your dream job and can't wait to apply. You know that you will be absolutely perfect for it; He has all the appropriate qualifications and experience and has spent the entire day preparing a job application along with a cover letter that deserves a literary award. You're just seconds away from submitting the request. Do not do it! Take a moment to go over the job application one more time to make sure you've avoided the common mistakes thousands of applicants make on their applications. Your resume ends up on the heap and your dream job is still exactly that; a dream.

Here are some mistakes to avoid on your job application:

• Spelling and grammar mistakes

Although these types of errors may seem small in nature, they can be a major red flag for most employers. They convey to recruiters or hiring managers that you are not paying attention to detail and will give the impression that you rushed to complete your application rather than work on it. Don't rush when completing your application and ask someone to review it, if possible.

• Not following directions

This is something they teach us in elementary school, but it's amazing how many of us still don't read or follow directions. Each application you fill out is slightly different and requires a unique response, so it's important to go over each step. You need to pay attention to everything when applying for a job. Rethink your strategy and do not apply for a job if you are not qualified for it.

• Submit a resume without altering it

Every time you submit your resume for a job application, make sure you have made changes according to the job you are applying for. If you expect your resume to fit the general criteria of the employer, it may cost you the job. Never submit your resume without tailoring it for a particular job role. Review qualifications, job description, and education requirements and use your resume to show the potential employer how you fit these requirements with your experience, skills, and prior experience.

• Write a generic cover letter

The purpose of your cover letter is to tell a compelling story so that it piques the hiring manager's interest enough for them to read your resume. You must refer to the employer by name and detail why you are a good candidate for the job. Don't use a generic cover letter for every job. Write a new one, depending on the position available.

• Do not go beyond the job description.

It is imperative to research the organization you are applying for. You need to know its structure, what it does, its goals, missions and values ​​to determine how it fits in. These things will be vital if you get an interview and you will be one step ahead, making a positive impression.

None.

Wut?

For those of you who know what a “cover letter” is, that generally means people who have been secretary-trained or are qualified as Pitman Secretaries. They know this:

  • A cover letter is not meant to make "a difference", be it in the past, present or "more".

Why?

For almost all correspondence situations, a cover letter is just a one-page affair with a few short paragraphs of business and superficial to serve as a "cover" or "front" (hence, a "cover") for some file. attached or attached (such as CV, curriculum vitae, catalog, quote, tender, status report, etc).

Not the type of essay-l

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None.

Wut?

For those of you who know what a “cover letter” is, that generally means people who have been secretary-trained or are qualified as Pitman Secretaries. They know this:

  • A cover letter is not meant to make "a difference", be it in the past, present or "more".

Why?

For almost all correspondence situations, a cover letter is just a one-page affair with a few short paragraphs of business and superficial to serve as a "cover" or "front" (hence, a "cover") for some file. attached or attached (such as CV, curriculum vitae, catalog, quote, tender, status report, etc).

It's not the kind of nonsense to reinvent the wheel of an essay that has been promoted online for the past 15 to 20 years by people who clearly had no secretarial or human resources training.

When looking for a job, many people think (wrongly) that a cover letter is where they explain why this or why that, things that should (and could have) incorporated into the CV or resume.

Let me give you the content of some typical cover letters that I used to send (below).


EXAMPLE 1

Dear Mr. Green

Opening of the Commercial Manager

I want to run for the opening, which our mutual acquaintance, Mr. Brian Haines of ABC Ltd., had told me about last week.

I will be happy to show you my work in a meeting at a time convenient for you and your team.

Your secretary can make the arrangements with mine (Jane Marshall, 555–234–1234).

Yours sincerely

Robert Charles Lee

Encs ← (means "enclosures" or attachments)


EXAMPLE # 2

One of my famous for professional collaboration: -

Dear Mr. Peak

Professional collaboration

John Richardson (president of ABC plc) told me that one of their divisions is looking for graphic design work on product development.

If you are interested in collaborating, we should get together and look at each other's work to see how we can share the work.

I am certainly interested in their work, as I have seen some of them at the Art and Design Exhibition of the San Martín School of Design this year. I also congratulate you for having won the Third Prize there.

Yours sincerely

RCL

Encs


EXAMPLE # 3

Pretty much everyone I know likes this one because it only has one paragraph:

Dear Mr. Hotchkiss

If you are interested in professional collaboration, please call Peter Wong to find out more about me. The three of us can meet and explore how we can maximize opportunities.

Yours sincerely

Robert Charles Lee


EXAMPLE # 4

Or something like this: -

Dear Mrs. Williams

Contract with Bigga Biscuits Ltd (Ref. 11387)

The final version of the contract between your two companies is attached below.

  • Please review and call me whether or not you have any further amendments or corrections.

The signing of the contract and the witness will be in my office at 10 am on Thursday, January 20, 1986.

Yours sincerely

Robert Charles Lee

Enc


EXAMPLE # 5

dear richard

R vs. Highsmith (1997)

Henry Smith wanted me to take care of this. I do not do criminal defense. Would you be interested?

Attached: Summary of the case (10pp) and some preliminaries (15pp). Full case file available (300pp).

Let me know before this Thursday (January 20).

Sincerely

RCL

Encs


EXAMPLE # 6

For job search, if a cover letter must contain something of material importance, it must be the Mission Statement and some extraneous matters: -

Attention: HR Department

Dear Mr / Mrs

Commercial Manager (ABC Post, 1/20 1994)

This is my application for the previous job offer.

  • My goal for the next 3 to 5 years is to stay in the import and export of mass consumer goods, but at a higher level than my current supervisory level. I want to further expand my exposure to include regional suppliers from Asia Pacific, compared to my current exposure with US and European suppliers.

I can start right away and expect a moderate salary. I speak French and some Italian, and I have a valid passport and a clean and safe driving record from employees.

I am used to receiving phone calls and text messages at any time of the day or night, so feel free to do so.

Sincerely

Robert Charles Lee

Mobile 555–234–1234

Encs


If someone has been paying attention, my cover letters usually contain names - Examples 1, 2, and 3.

Networking has its benefits.

The cover letter is the perfect place to put names.

Thanks for the A2A.

Without a doubt, detail your achievements, with empirical data to illustrate it. For instance:

  • Consistently made 22 sandwiches per hour (KPI was 18)
  • 11% to 18% under budget on the 8 projects I managed ($ 400k to $ 900k budgets). All projects evaluated as successful or excellent.
  • Managing staff was always rated 3.5 or higher (target was 3.0, on a scale of 1 to 5).


This is the kind of thing that they prove that it can deliver results and that you can easily verify with your previous employers. Indeed, it is money that you can deposit when applying for a job.

This is so obvious and so man

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Without a doubt, detail your achievements, with empirical data to illustrate it. For instance:

  • Consistently made 22 sandwiches per hour (KPI was 18)
  • 11% to 18% under budget on the 8 projects I managed ($ 400k to $ 900k budgets). All projects evaluated as successful or excellent.
  • Managing staff was always rated 3.5 or higher (target was 3.0, on a scale of 1 to 5).


This is the kind of thing that they prove that it can deliver results and that you can easily verify with your previous employers. Indeed, it is money that you can deposit when applying for a job.

This is so obvious, and many people are afraid to put it on a resume, afraid of being "pinned down." When it comes down to it, it doesn't matter much else (aside from the woolly "cultural setting").

What I notice the most is how well the candidates have prepared - the one who has done this most effectively can get the job instead of a more qualified one. These are my best tips.

Start by studying the job description and specification of the person (if there is one), as well as the job posting / interview invitation information and the website of the organization in question. Logically, these should give you all the "clues" you need to start guessing the types of skills and competencies required in the post. The interview questions should be about these. After this, start to think more broadly about the organization, its values, “mar

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What I notice the most is how well the candidates have prepared - the one who has done this most effectively can get the job instead of a more qualified one. These are my best tips.

Start by studying the job description and specification of the person (if there is one), as well as the job posting / interview invitation information and the website of the organization in question. Logically, these should give you all the "clues" you need to start guessing the types of skills and competencies required in the post. The interview questions should be about these. After this, start thinking more broadly about the organization, its values, the "market" / sector (s) in which it operates and in what context you are working. The more you know about them and their market circumstances, the easier it will be to "pitch" yourself as a good candidate.

That should be a good start to preparing, which in turn should help you feel like the questions are "easier," you are more confident, and you are more likely to impress your interviewer.

It all depends on what you mean by "nothing". If you mean people are hired to work in positions they haven't previously held, well, that happens all the time.

It all depends on your interpretation of that term "nothing". For example, consider a newly hired person in the role of Customer Service Specialist in a retail store; and you don't know anything about how to make a sale using a cash register. Well, that wouldn't necessarily be unusual. Perhaps that person knows very little about the product line the store sells. So in a way, to an outsider, that person may appear to be

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It all depends on what you mean by "nothing". If you mean people are hired to work in positions they haven't previously held, well, that happens all the time.

It all depends on your interpretation of that term "nothing". For example, consider a newly hired person in the role of Customer Service Specialist in a retail store; and you don't know anything about how to make a sale using a cash register. Well, that wouldn't necessarily be unusual. Perhaps that person knows very little about the product line the store sells. So somehow, to an outsider, that person may appear to be working slower than other Customer Service people and thus may appear to know "nothing" about work. But is it?

That newly hired person may know a lot about being an effective listener. Or perhaps, if the store sells clothing, perhaps the person has a keen eye on fashion; and you know something about what looks good on the people you serve. Or perhaps that person's instinctual reaction when a customer approaches is to look them in the eye ... and smile. Well, these are 3 very important skills that employers value in an employee. So even though the newly hired Customer Service Specialist knows nothing about how to make a sale, that person may have other relevant or adaptable skills; as well as strong soft skill sets that would be of great benefit to the employer. Well, this is exactly how some people who know "nothing" about a job get into those kinds of positions. It happens a lot!

Of course I am using a very basic entry level job as an example. But you should understand. It is not about whether you "know a job" or "have done a job." But employers look at all the skill sets and disciplines an applicant has; And from them, a reasonably knowledgeable hiring manager may decide to hire someone who appears to "know nothing" about a particular job or job function.

Now, in the case of "excelling at a job," well, there is only one proven and safe way to excel at something: doing it repeatedly until you can do it perfectly or almost perfectly. The more exposed (or assigned) someone to perform the task, the better they excel at it.

One last detail: Have you seen job listings that say "I'll train?" This is how people who know nothing about a job get to those positions. And yes, assuming they have skills that are relevant to the tasks associated with a job, then they will be hired in positions where, to an outsider, the employee may not know anything about a job.

And if you ask me about my own professional experiences ... I would say that most of my cross-industry experiences involved doing something that I knew nothing or almost nothing about. I'm just more focused on getting work done than doing anything else during my 8-10 hours at the office.

I was fired from a job once. I submitted about 10 requests per day. I adapted each one to the specific requirements of the job.

I ended up getting a request to interview with a company that I hadn't even sent my resume to. I had worked with them before and then I learned what my skills were. I was surprised and happy. I studied my tail for the technical interview, because I knew the people who would be interviewing me. The interview consisted of "When you start next week this is what you will be working on !!!!"

For those who enjoy burning bridges by "scolding an employer when they go to a new job ..." T

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I was fired from a job once. I submitted about 10 requests per day. I adapted each one to the specific requirements of the job.

I ended up getting a request to interview with a company that I hadn't even sent my resume to. I had worked with them before and then I learned what my skills were. I was surprised and happy. I studied my tail for the technical interview, because I knew the people who would be interviewing me. The interview consisted of "When you start next week this is what you will be working on !!!!"

For those of you who enjoy burning bridges by "scolding an employer when you go to a new job ..." This is a lesson in the fact that you could very well have what happened to me if you leave on good terms. I continued working for them for another 15 years. A great experience.

Hi Hyena,

Yes, it is not very difficult to find out. Large organizations have ATS that tracks the duplicate profile in a fraction of a second. You can edit the resume / job roles, but the basic details like name and contact details remain the same and with that you can roll back previous activities.

In small organizations, even if they don't have any specific tools in place, many times the number of profiles they get is not in volume, so figuring out the same profile with little research with Excel and the database can let them know their previous application.

A few years after I graduated from law school, I contacted the dean of a law school that was located in the city where I lived to ask for advice on the steps I needed to take to qualify to teach at a law school somewhere. . point in the future. My meeting with the dean was strictly an information gathering session. The law school itself was not hiring. In fact, the law school was subject to a university-wide hiring freeze at the time.

Two months later, the phone rang. It was the dean.

He informed me that a teacher had unexpectedly passed away, creating a vacancy that had to be filled immediately.

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A few years after I graduated from law school, I contacted the dean of a law school that was located in the city where I lived to ask for advice on the steps I needed to take to qualify to teach at a law school somewhere. . point in the future. My meeting with the dean was strictly an information gathering session. The law school itself was not hiring. In fact, the law school was subject to a university-wide hiring freeze at the time.

Two months later, the phone rang. It was the dean.

He informed me that a teacher had unexpectedly passed away, creating a vacancy that needed to be filled immediately. The university had granted the law school an emergency waiver of the hiring freeze and authorized them to hire a replacement for a period of one year.

By a strange coincidence, he had the same specialty in the field as the professor who had passed away. The dean invited me to an interview for the position and I was hired.

When I go out into the "world", I am full of energy and very optimistic, alert and resourceful. I can be the "life of the party". People will tend to flock around me because that's where the lively discussions on just about any topic take place. What no one knows is that when I'm home alone ... I'm the "couch life." Every time the phone rings, I swear out loud, “Who the hell is that? Leave me alone. "(Then I pick up the phone very normally and say in a cheerful voice:" Hello, you! What's wrong? ")

Sometimes someone knocks on my sliding glass door to the back deck. Even before i know who i am

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When I go out into the "world", I am full of energy and very optimistic, alert and resourceful. I can be the "life of the party". People will tend to flock around me because that's where the lively discussions on just about any topic take place. What no one knows is that when I'm home alone ... I'm the "couch life." Every time the phone rings, I swear out loud, “Who the hell is that? Leave me alone. "(Then I pick up the phone very normally and say in a cheerful voice:" Hello, you! What's wrong? ")

Sometimes someone knocks on my sliding glass door to the back deck. Before I even know who it is, I am totally disheartened and offended and will mutter under my breath (as I move towards the door) “NOW, what the hell do YOU ​​want? Why don't you go fuck off, you son of a bitch?

My home is my cocoon, cave, mole hole; This is where I snuggle when I'm sick and tired of socializing, having light conversation, being "sparkling." I speak out loud throughout the house, to myself or just to the cats or to the air. This is where I allow myself to discharge all the negative charge from my battery. If I stay there long enough (a few days), I start to soften up and become my happy old self again, ready to face this fucking stupid world and all the idiots in it.

And there you have it. Now everyone knows. Happy? Well. So please go now.

Check the skills specifically mentioned in the job application. If you are also aware of the position they are looking for, great to go. But try to match your mentioned skills with yours. If you have them in common, you're good to go. If not, take your time and see what common skills most companies are looking for, for a particular position that interests you.

So take your time and prepare.

The internet is the best place where you can find paid and unpaid courses. Give them a try. And he starts giving interviews.

If it fails, try again. After giving the interview, come

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Check the skills specifically mentioned in the job application. If you are also aware of the position they are looking for, great to go. But try to match your mentioned skills with yours. If you have them in common, you're good to go. If not, take your time and see what common skills most companies are looking for, for a particular position that interests you.

So take your time and prepare.

The internet is the best place where you can find paid and unpaid courses. Give them a try. And he starts giving interviews.

If it fails, try again. After giving the interview, return home and make a list of the questions that were asked of you at various companies. You will notice that most of them have questions in common.

This will help.

Best wishes.

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