What is life without work?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Lilly Scott



What is life without work?

It's called survival, which is something I've done well all my life. It is not living or thriving, but it is the determination to stay alive that has kept me going for decades. I've survived so many bad life circumstances over the years that being unemployed is just another notch on my perseverance belt, against all odds. No potential employer has any idea how poor I am or my dire financial problems. It is something that I do not let see because most people are cruel to the poor and marginalize them to dust. Furthermore, many believe that the poor will do anything for money, as if those with

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It's called survival, which is something I've done well all my life. It is not living or thriving, but it is the determination to stay alive that has kept me going for decades. I've survived so many bad life circumstances over the years that being unemployed is just another notch on my perseverance belt, against all odds. No potential employer has any idea how poor I am or my dire financial problems. It is something that I do not let see because most people are cruel to the poor and marginalize them to dust. Furthermore, many believe that the poor will do anything for money, as if those without $ are suddenly morally corrupt. Poverty is a lack of viable means and resources, not a lack of character or morals. Anyone, and I mean anyone, it can fall into difficult times. Many people live from paycheck to paycheck without any kind of buffer against total catastrophe. This is the reality of much of America these days. It is hard and cold fact and not fiction! If it weren't for the kindness of others, I would now be left homeless without a stable, paid job. I am thankful, because I realize that many have even fewer opportunities to be employed because they have run away too much. In my opinion, no one is unemployed, but the more you sink into poverty, the harder it becomes to get out of the quicksand. At a certain point, society calls you a lost cause if you don't have an ID, no car, no address, no help. You become a breathing living entity called a non-person, since enough poverty erases the fact that you are even human! Without a steady and regular income, you learn to do without and do without many luxuries in life. Learn to choose between needs, knowing well that many will not be met and will probably remain unmet. Insurance and healthcare are a privilege that I have dispensed with for years. My preventive care is to pray that nothing terrible happens and to use my knowledge of alternative medicine to self-medicate, when I can afford it. I have had to do without dental care for 4 years, yes, to the detriment of my health, but luckily my pain threshold is high to be able to handle the constant pain of bad teeth. I'm lucky because tooth damage doesn't stop me from smiling or being embarrassed about doing it. I can still fake a middle class smile. I've learned to cut my hair because I can't even spend the $ to get a good haircut. I have learned to be comfortable without wearing makeup, as personal care items are often expensive and a luxury. Beauty and vanity through cosmetics are reserved for job interviews, so one can find oneself semi-armed in a hyper-competitive and ruthless job market. I have learned to separate / sell many of my prized personal belongings to make sure my pets are well cared for, even if I manage without them they will be taken care of! I am about to possibly not be able to pay more for my car due to lack of money to keep it in good condition and not enough money for gas, which makes job interviews challenging at times. My car is worth only a little over $ 500, a paltry sum for someone with a consistent, high-paying job, but priceless to me as a small means of independence in a car-dependent city. It's not like I can ask a potential employer to reimburse me for gas money and lost time if they choose not to hire me. They do not realize that I am no longer middle class, they do not know me. I realize that it is more $ lost than I really needed to live, that is very difficult to handle. This is a harsh reality, but one that many unemployed people struggle with. Every month without work is and possesses a new challenge and new struggles that grind your mind and body into pulp. How much money you can create is up to you and no one else. You are creating money out of thin air, always thinking about it and ways to stay afloat. It keeps you awake at night and prevents you from eating, there is always anxiety and stress. You think and think about supposed solutions in dollars, most of the time in the long term they require money that you no longer have. Some options are bad, like selling plasma for $, it is detrimental to my health. Others may be better if the E-bay selling gods are in your favor. Selling precious family heirlooms made me cry for a month because it allowed me to breathe and I was mentally at peace for at least a month. I am so depressed and yes I have survived depression years ago due to family abuse and a difficult marriage. I consider myself very tough right now because of all the adversities in life and, if anything, I feel terribly frustrated and angry that I am not being employed when I need it. I think both anger and frustration are justified, at least I don't give up. I also volunteered while unemployed, but this is in no way helping me or has helped me get a job. if anything, he gets me interviews in which those with the money and the ability to hire me ask strange questions about why someone would spend their time helping others. I suppose those who interview me assume that I am an overly nice person who is naive and easily taken advantage of, that's not exactly the case. I'm just someone who cares, I worried when I was a kid I cared when I had money and I will always care for humanity regardless of my financial circumstances. Perhaps many employers do not want to understand that and it is their choice, I have nothing against them. It would be great if employers saw compassion not as a weakness, but as an asset. If something maybe being out of work just confirms the terrible luck I've had my entire life, maybe it confirms that years of family abuse have done the desired damage by making it difficult for me to thrive without help. Or maybe it's something else entirely and God / universe / spirit is telling me to wake up and follow the path that I was denied for years. Perhaps my story, my talents, can somehow lift me out of life's financial ruin without a "normal job." Either way, I am determined to fight unemployment with everything I have. Even if no employer considers my value to be employable, I still stand for a reason. There is no such thing as unemployed or untenable, it is only based on perception and bias. I am sure there is something and someone out there, I will keep looking and wishing for a better tomorrow because giving up would mean that I am ready to die. Or maybe it's something else entirely and God / universe / spirit is telling me to wake up and follow the path that I was denied for years. Perhaps my story, my talents, can somehow lift me out of life's financial ruin without a "normal job." Either way, I am determined to fight unemployment with everything I have. Even if no employer considers my value to be employable, I still stand for a reason. There is no such thing as unemployed or untenable, it is only based on perception and bias. I am sure there is something and someone out there, I will keep looking and wishing for a better tomorrow because giving up would mean that I am ready to die. Or maybe it's something else entirely and God / universe / spirit is telling me to wake up and follow the path that I was denied for years. Perhaps my story, my talents, can somehow lift me out of life's financial ruin without a "normal job." Either way, I am determined to fight unemployment with everything I have. Even if no employer considers my value to be employable, I still stand for a reason. There is no such thing as unemployed or untenable, it is only based on perception and bias. I am sure there is something and someone out there, I will keep looking and wishing for a better tomorrow because giving up would mean that I am ready to die. it can somehow lift me out of the financial ruin of life without a "normal job". Either way, I am determined to fight unemployment with everything I have. Even if no employer considers my value to be employable, I still stand for a reason. There is no such thing as unemployed or untenable, it is only based on perception and bias. I am sure there is something and someone out there, I will keep looking and wishing for a better tomorrow because giving up would mean that I am ready to die. it can somehow lift me out of the financial ruin of life without a "normal job". Either way, I am determined to fight unemployment with everything I have. Even if no employer considers my value to be employable, I still stand for a reason. There is no such thing as unemployed or untenable, it is only based on perception and bias. I am sure there is something and someone out there, I will keep looking and wishing for a better tomorrow because giving up would mean that I am ready to die. it's just based on perception and bias. I am sure there is something and someone out there, I will keep looking and wishing for a better tomorrow because giving up would mean that I am ready to die. it's just based on perception and bias. I am sure there is something and someone out there, I will keep looking and wishing for a better tomorrow because giving up would mean that I am ready to die.

How bad is a life without work? I've been asked this question a lot lately. It is becoming quite clear that the forces of globalization and technological progress are reshaping economies and societies, especially in advanced economies, and that these effects are felt more at the center of the workforce, through people and societies. families that make up what Americans do. call the middle class. Many of the traditional jobs for these people are disappearing in the rich world and the wages of the remaining workers are quite stagnant.

The fact that the middle class is being emptied into co

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How bad is a life without work? I've been asked this question a lot lately. It is becoming quite clear that the forces of globalization and technological progress are reshaping economies and societies, especially in advanced economies, and that these effects are felt more at the center of the workforce, through people and societies. families that make up what Americans do. call the middle class. Many of the traditional jobs for these people are disappearing in the rich world and the wages of the remaining workers are quite stagnant.

The fact that the middle class is being emptied in country after country is cause for concern. A large, stable and prosperous middle class is important to civil society; Most informed observers agree that he supports inclusion, tolerance, democracy, and many other good things. It is also a great driver of overall demand in an economy - many moderately wealthy households buy a lot of things. But what happens when the industrial-age jobs that supported the middle class start to disappear? Voltaire offered a prophetic warning, observing: "Work saves us from three great evils: boredom, vice and need."

Of these three, my least concern is need. Trade and technological progress, after all, make a society richer as a whole. The problem they bring is not one of scarcity, of not having enough for everyone. Instead, they raise thorny allocation issues. Most of us earn money to buy the things we need through our work. What do we do when job opportunities are scarce?

So to boredom and vice: how bad are they? How concerned should we be for them? Sometimes I hear the argument that we shouldn't worry at all. If we don't need people's work, logic goes, why should we care what they do? Why should traditional notions of boredom and vice matter? If people want to drink, do drugs, have casual sex, or play video games all day, where is the harm? These are not the conventionally most respectable or productive activities, but why should we let convention prevail?

One cause for concern comes from political scientist Charles Murray's research documenting how much social conditions have changed in the past 50 years for lower-middle-class Americans (while remaining essentially unchanged for the upper-middle class). Divorce rates have skyrocketed, as have crime rates, the number of children raised outside of two-parent homes, and the number of men who have essentially abandoned family and community life.

These social ills have gone hand in hand with the demise of industrial-age jobs. There is an active debate on whether the disappearance of permanent work causes them or if they are all due to other factors. I am in the field that believes that the disappearance of work is a cause, not just a correlation.

If people want to drink, do drugs, have casual sex, or play video games all day, where is the harm?

A recent article published by 2015 Nobel Prize winner Angus Deaton and Anne Case reveals a trend far more alarming than social decline: while the death rates of nearly all American adults have fallen dramatically in recent decades, those of less educated middle-aged whites have actually increased. They found that between 1999 and 2013 the death rates for this group increased by 134 per 100,000. This is a big jump. As Deaton writes: "Only HIV / AIDS in contemporary times has done something like this."

What is causing this tragic increase? Professors Deaton and Case found that most of the increase could be attributed to three factors: suicide, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, and alcohol and drug intoxication. People in this socioeconomic group, in other words, are committing suicide deliberately and inadvertently, quickly and slowly.

Much more research is required to understand the causes of this development. But I don't think that the labor problems of this group are secondary to history; I think they are critical to this, and that it is far from a coincidence that the employment-to-population ratio for American adults with no more than a high school degree was less than 52 percent in September. The boredom and vice that arise when work leaves are a serious public health problem.

Interestingly, Professors Deaton and Case find that Hispanic and black Americans have not seen the same recent increases in mortality. This could be because they have been more economically marginalized and therefore less used to the stable middle-class jobs that whites have enjoyed, but which are now disappearing for the less educated among them.

This is far from the whole story. But it seems to me that Voltaire's first two great evils are starting to show up in health and social statistics, and we should all be concerned about that.

Greetings..

I am unemployed by choice.

I moved with my family (spouse and two children) from my home country to the United States a few years ago on an H1B visa work assignment (a work authorization obtained by my employer from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services). USA).

During my stay in the USA, I had the opportunity to live in many states due to my project assignments. My family and I enjoy visiting new places.

At that time my wife was not working because she did not have a work authorization and had a dependent visa. After about 3 years of stay in the USA, we managed to get his work visa through a friend who operated ar

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I am unemployed by choice.

I moved with my family (spouse and two children) from my home country to the United States a few years ago on an H1B visa work assignment (a work authorization obtained by my employer from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services). USA).

During my stay in the USA, I had the opportunity to live in many states due to my project assignments. My family and I enjoy visiting new places.

At that time my wife was not working because she did not have a work authorization and had a dependent visa. After about 3 years of stay in the USA, we managed to get her work visa through a friend who operated a recruiting / staffing company and in the fourth year she was able to find a job as a contractor with a client organization.

Since my work authorization was for a total of 6 years, my employment ceased at the end of the sixth year. Personally, I wanted to travel back to my home country and continue my work with my employer from then and I also wanted my spouse to join her current employer in home country, but she did not want to leave the US. I still had 3 more years of validity of employment.

The next option for me was to travel back to my home country and stay away from my family for a year in order to apply for a new work authorization for a new period of 6 years. Once I have the new work visa, I can re-enter the US, find a job, and reunite with my family. Another option was to stay out of work until my wife's green card or permanent residency application is approved, as a result, I too would be eligible to work in the US That way we don't have to be away for as long as it is. .

We both agreed that we should go for the last option, that is, wait for PR. He couldn't imagine managing the house and two children with his stressful job in my absence. I graciously accepted because I thought it was right to support my family. My parents also appreciated my decision.

After 10 months of waiting without work, my wife's public relations was denied after several inquiries due to an error by an immigration attorney. This bothered us because our plan did not work as expected.

The next option was to submit a new PR request with the proper documentation. But her client she worked for wanted to ditch the contractors or make her a full-time employee. She chose to become a full-time employee rather than lose her job. But his terms didn't sit well with the new employer, as they didn't promise to start the public relations application process. As a result, he began looking for a new job and found a much better company in another state. We managed to move to the new place of his work without any problem. The new company has started its PR application one month after joining. I have been out of work for about 20 months and I hope to be out of work for another 10 months,

My life as unemployed for the last 20 months:

  1. I took a recruiting job with an incentive that could be paid in my home country. It kept me busy, but not very successful. I learned from job seekers here that there are many people like me who were unable to accept or get a job due to various limitations. They sacrificed their passion for work, as family was their first priority.
  2. I started to drop off and pick up my wife from / to her workplace. I used to cook lunch / dinner, drop off and pick up my kids from after school programs / activities. I used to be so busy that the day seems to be short. I couldn't even find time to go to the gym and exercise.
  3. After moving to the new place, I can take some time to exercise.
  4. I started selling on an online shopping site. It's still not as lucrative as I used to earn from my paycheck. It takes a long time and it is not so encouraging.
  5. I started doing daily transactions on the stock market in my home country.
  6. I have set personal goals for learning new professional skills and obtaining certifications. So far I was able to learn new skills through online training courses. I am looking to get certified in the next few months.
  7. I am planning to start training / teaching so I can keep up with skills.
  8. I had trouble starting to learn new skills as there were too many things on my mind. Later I learned to work on one thing at a time.
  9. I missed my social life because I was afraid of facing people who might disrespect me because I am unemployed. In most cases, I used to mention my work from home.
  10. I'm fine to go through all of this for my loving family. There is a saying: "No matter how poor a person is, if he has a family, he is rich!"
  11. These are difficult and uncertain times that I am living in. You never know what will be left here tomorrow. That is why I enjoy what we have every day, that is why it is something that we can carry in our memory when things change.
  12. My spouse sometimes has a hard time, it can be due to a stressful job and health problems. I expect more love from my better half for all the things I miss out on, but I get frustrated when she is tough on me. However, nothing changes. I comfort myself by accepting that we are human and that to err is human. No body is perfect and forgiving our deficiencies allows us to solve the problem and gives us back joy and happiness.

I'm not used to writing on Quora. Sorry for my bad English. This is just a small effort that I made to have the opportunity to share my story. Thanks for reading my post.

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Edit:

Thanks to all who have expressed their sincerity towards my situation. I really appreciate reading each and every one of your comments (even the negative ones). However, this post was not intended to provoke sympathy or sadness. Its purpose is to provoke inspiration, hope and positivity. As much as I enjoy his empathic perspectives, I prefer to enjoy each and every reader to embrace happiness. Once again, thanks to each and every one of you for reading this post. I hope everyone has a wonderful day!

Response to comments:

Amita, I don't think it's that difficult when I put myself in my partner's shoes.

Ganesh, you are right. I wanted to work in the United States and have my family with me. My spouse was with me and stayed home. Now that my spouse is working, now I stay home and it seems fine to me. When my children start living their life, we can live here or move to my home country depending on our needs or priorities. I'm not sure what he meant by cremated on his own ground. Cremation is the process of disposing of the corpse. Nothing matters after the body is dead. What matters is how good he was to his immediate family and to society when he was alive. If they valued his contribution in his life even after his bodily absence.

Omkar, I personally think that hiring companies right now is not as good as it used to be a year ago. You can contact recruiters if you want to search for a recruiter job. There are many of them in dice or in fact.

Salman, I don't want to sound like my husband is bad. Maybe I need to do more to get rid of that feeling of insecurity that my partner may be going through. There is a saying, man is made of his beliefs and also of his actions. I said a magic word to my partner today and she used the same thing on me and all of our stress was relieved. The magic word was SORRY! We are discovering and learning from each other.

Madhavan, I did not ask my employer far in advance because I wanted to travel back to my home country. I was also so busy with work that I couldn't follow up with my Manager. They tried to process it, but it was too late.

Terence, you don't have to. By the way, it's about giving! Merry Christmas!!

Jezebel, I agree. I did not want to do it. I do not know how to say it. Let me put it this way… My spouse and I agreed…. Even if I disagreed, my spouse would still follow me to travel back to my home country. I just wanted to make his wish possible even if it required sacrificing my passionate work. My spouse asked me lately to join my job, but I can't imagine leaving him all the heavy lifting with managing a stressful job, home, and kids.

Krishna, I don't think it is a bad decision, under the circumstances. It's called defending the family no matter what! I support my spouse both in the profession and at home. Most of the time it is not "me" or "my" but "we" when you do it for your family. True happiness is when you take steps to make your loved ones smile. I do not regret sacrificing work as I did to make my dear wife happy. Although it is painful when my partner does not value my sacrifices, it is temporary. Sometimes you have to make some sacrifices to save your family. There are always job opportunities but not family.

Surgou, buying shares for less and selling for more! I don't believe in straight charts, always up or down. I try to choose the ones that have a constant rising and falling chart in the hope that the market rate will go up after falling as it had a history of recovering the last high rate in a short period.

Carl, thank you for your kind words of wisdom.

Mei, it's never too late!

I would be adding responses to other comments when possible.

I quit my job as a banker two months ago with the following reason:

“I need a break after 8 years in the industry and I will go somewhere to enjoy my life. I'm going to do the job that I love to be: a translator. If I cannot survive with this option, I will rejoin the banking industry and get a new job. "

Then, I quit my full-time job despite many advice from my friends, my direct manager, who was concerned about whether I was thinking well.

He was continually in a bad mood before resignation. My tasks were quite complicated. I always received difficult assignments that required most of my day alone

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I quit my job as a banker two months ago with the following reason:

“I need a break after 8 years in the industry and I will go somewhere to enjoy my life. I'm going to do the job that I love to be: a translator. If I cannot survive with this option, I will rejoin the banking industry and get a new job. "

Then, I quit my full-time job despite many advice from my friends, my direct manager, who was concerned about whether I was thinking well.

He was continually in a bad mood before resignation. My tasks were quite complicated. I always received difficult assignments that required most of my day just to sit at my desk and check stupid and silly historical transactions. It really made me feel lost in a deep infinity pool of tiny little numbers. Day by day, the more I worked, the more I could affirm that this job was definitely not for me. Also, my family had some problems. Every member of my family was quite exhausted, heartbroken, and didn't really know what to do next except live like corpses. So to rescue myself from these things with the reasons I listed above in my head, I stopped working there, went on a trip for 1 week, and stayed home until now.

What is life without work?

I can answer with a few things that I experienced during the last two months:

  1. My life has not been in order as always. I would stay up late at night and wake up late. He ate when he wanted to eat, anytime he was hungry. The biological clock developed during the period of my working life has been totally destroyed. There is no time to go to bed at 10 at night and get up at 7 in the morning. There is no breakfast at 7:50, no lunch time at 12pm. And there's no dinner time at 7 p.m. M. It was something I couldn't stop. Because ... I was so aimless. Why do I need to wake up, eat and go to bed on time? Why don't I have to go to work for once?
  2. I no longer had a monthly salary. So spending every penny of my paycheck for the last month and month 13 has been a bit difficult. He couldn't spend on some things he used to spend before without thinking. I had to save for the next end of the month. Somehow it was a bit awkward not being able to have coffee at Starbucks like I used to. Starbucks was placed on the "expensive stuff" list. I almost stayed home, rarely went out, and only went out for the necessary relief from this: "I can't-bear-any-more-the-stress-of-staying-home-all-day."
  3. Money is a big problem as it bothers me. Even though I prepared my savings in case I couldn't find a job in a couple of months, money kept putting pressure on me every day when I wasn't making any extra money. I started to implement the plan of looking for some freelance jobs as a translator to earn some money. It was never as easy as I thought. I was not the best among the hundreds of best freelancers out there, so the percentage of competitors to win a job has never exceeded 50%. I did the job as a freelance translator a long time ago with only a few small projects. Then I came back and starting over has been very difficult. But I got a job posted on an independent Vietnamese website.

That moment, after several failures to get a freelance job with an unattractive résumé and less proven experience, I began to feel hopeless and to think about my current scenario.

I did not gain enough experience in this new field (translation) to convince clients that I might be able to perform their tasks. I didn't prepare well before leaving my full-time job. I did not think well of the financial situation of being a freelancer: it is unstable if I cannot have clients. Consequently, I made only a few bucks of $ 15 and no more, meanwhile my savings have been shrinking every day. Nothing is easy these days if you are not a professional, an expert in what you offer to clients.

What I mean is that having a job, no matter how much you hate it, is still more stable than living without one. We all need some cash to spend on our essential needs. Don't create posted quotes like "find your passion, do what you love to do, live your dreams" or something like that. It is only for talented or professional people who can pursue and develop their passions well. (For example, once you can't sing, you will never be able to sing beautifully no matter how much you practice.) Or if you still desperately want to have your dream job, please prepare enough savings or funds to keep your daily life well. . Money is a monster.

For me it has been an experience that has taught me how naive I have been to think that I could practice more working as a freelancer. Nobody will hire and pay me to practice. Clients always need the best professionals.

So far so good. Life without work really woke me up, didn't it?

I will tell you the story of two unemployed people. We are my husband and I!

Yes, we are both currently unemployed. We recently finished our master's degree in Germany and immediately got married afterwards. During the last few months during our master's thesis, we did not have time to look for work. What bad planning can be said! And finally we end up being two married and unemployed Indians in Germany. The first days were really incredible, as we had all the time in the world and we were newlyweds. What else do you want!!

But in a couple of weeks we started to feel the pressure of not having an income. How

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I will tell you the story of two unemployed people. We are my husband and I!

Yes, we are both currently unemployed. We recently finished our master's degree in Germany and immediately got married afterwards. During the last few months during our master's thesis, we did not have time to look for work. What bad planning can be said! And finally we end up being two married and unemployed Indians in Germany. The first days were really incredible, as we had all the time in the world and we were newlyweds. What else do you want!!

But in a couple of weeks we started to feel the pressure of not having an income. Like many other couples, we couldn't plan expensive restaurant dates or even a movie in a theater. Even if we wanted to buy flowers for each other, we had to think twice. As our parents support us financially, all expenses were based on the conversion of euros to rupees in our minds.

Due to stress, her husband decided to take an hourly paid job at Decathlon. He began to travel for almost 3 hours a day for work. And he was working for 8 hours there. We are little relieved that we can at least manage the rent and food on our own. But within a few weeks he realized that due to the hectic schedule he was lagging behind in job applications. So collectively we decided to stop thinking about money for now, asking you to quit temp and focus on job applications.

All this happened in a span of 3 months and one fine day we decided that we will not allow our lives to become boring just due to lack of money and work. The first major change we made was waking up early. The first day we could see improvements in our mood, energy and concentration. Despite the bad weather on the first day, we cycled and loved it. The next day the routine continued. We cycled for 3 days and our lives felt so much happier and more interesting.

Some weekends, we took a little hike on the hill behind our house and played some games with our German friends.

I always wanted to learn to swim and my husband is a passionate swimmer. He showed me pictures of the local pool and the next day we bought seasonal cards. We both have free time and we are living in a city where they have amazing pools with student discounts. We were 10 minutes from the pool and my husband is an amazing coach. Not even on earth was he going to miss this opportunity to learn to swim.

(Bud spencer bad, Schwäbisch Gmünd, source: stwgd.de)

One of the best things we did in this period was to grow few vegetables on our own. We are both very conscious of our health and diet. So planting vegetables was the first thing we did in our spare time. We planted tomatoes, basil, peas, coriander, salad, mint, and last but not least, Methi (fenugreek). We love methi and unfortunately we cannot buy that in Germany. When you don't get it, you cultivate it! We grew methi on our balcony and had amazing methi kill malai.

So this is our life without work. It's not perfect but we love it. My mom always says that one day this job search will end and you will get a job. Then you will understand how important this free time was. You shouldn't regret wasting such a beautiful period of your life just on job applications.

You will long for this free time later, live it!

Edit:

A year has passed since I wrote this answer. Later I received a lot of feedback from people who were curious about our progress.

So after leaving the mini job, my husband went to work in a Nepalese restaurant in the same city where we lived. She really enjoyed that job when she got to work in the kitchen and loves to cook. He had to work only at night and made his job applications during the day. So it was the right decision for him to quit that hectic hourly paid job he was doing before.

Two months after writing this answer, he got a permanent job in his field. Apart from the owner of the Nepalese restaurant, everyone was very happy with this!

We moved to a new city for his job and a few months later I got a job in the same city.

So we are both working and living a happy life in Germany. Our parents are proud of us!

We have already decided to return to our parents all the money they gave us during our fight. And we are close to achieving that goal !!

Thank you all for the lovely comments of support. Also thanks to those who wrote hateful comments. That pushed us further to reach our goals earlier!

Life without work is detrimental to a person's self-esteem and general spirit. I have a permanent disability due to serious medical problems. I haven't worked since 2003 when I almost died. My health is difficult at best. When I think about never going to work again, I find this overwhelming feeling that I am waiting to die. For someone in their forties, this is tragic.

Life without work is torture. What a job brings to a person's life is social interaction, a purpose and meaning for their life, a much-needed structure. Without work, a person loses these things. Your social circle becomes

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Life without work is detrimental to a person's self-esteem and general spirit. I have a permanent disability due to serious medical problems. I haven't worked since 2003 when I almost died. My health is difficult at best. When I think about never going to work again, I find this overwhelming feeling that I am waiting to die. For someone in their forties, this is tragic.

Life without work is torture. What a job brings to a person's life is social interaction, a purpose and meaning for their life, a much-needed structure. Without work, a person loses these things. Their social circle becomes much smaller and they begin to feel useless and isolated from the rest of the world. When they talk to friends and family, they don't have their job to talk about in work-related conversations.

After being without work for a while, the days begin to run together and life is just an eternal week with no work week to cherish the weekend. If it weren't for the activity in the world of retail, the holidays could be lost in the vast emptiness of the days without measure.

Fortunately, due to the availability of financial aid, I was able to take part-time classes to earn my degree in photography. It took me a long time to take the necessary classes due to my health problems, I also took some of my classes online, but I got my degree. During this time, I felt like I had a purpose and could feel like a human being. It was nice, and I would recommend anyone out of a job to consider taking the classes necessary to get at least a certificate in something.

As for the money, yes, there is the lack of money that sucks. Depending on where you live (country), you can determine whether or not there is government assistance available. By living in the United States, I can receive a disability and a minimal amount of food assistance. Every time you go from having an average paying job to having a disability, there is a major cut in pay, which means a drastic change in lifestyle. You may have to switch from drinking coffee at a coffee shop to instant coffee packets in your microwave. Anyway, my passion is movies. When I worked, I went to the movies regularly. Now, I go to a morning session once or twice a year. I went out to eat at a good restaurant at least once a week. Now, I treat myself to McDonald's twice a month, of the menu in dollars. So, the loss and / or reduction of income has had a great impact on my life since I had to leave work. I can only imagine what it's like to not even have a monthly disability check.

I have managed to adapt my lifestyle around the money I receive, for which I am very grateful. Now, instead of going out to buy a book, I get it at the library. Instead of going to the movies, I have a streaming subscription that has a lot of movies available to watch. And instead of going out to eat, I have found that I love to cook (also, I eat healthier).

How is life without work? It is similar to living with a job. Life is what you make of it. Whether you work full-time, part-time, or not, you can be as happy or as miserable as you like. Of course, not having a job makes it difficult to have a normal life, but it is not impossible.

When they ask me not to work, I always tell people the following: during the first two weeks it is nice. You can sleep in late, you spend all day in your pajamas, you watch TV as late as you want, and you don't have any boss above your head yelling at you to meet your deadlines. Then after the first two weeks, you're tired all the time, you hate your pajamas (even though you've been wearing them for three days in a row), everything on TV is boring, and even a boss yelling at you would at least be some communication with the exterior world. And a deadline? It would be a welcome challenge.

Hope this gives you an idea that helps answer your question. I've been through all of this for the last 14 and a half years.

  • It's your cousin's wedding reception. You are there reluctantly. You see your father in an ugly shirt. You offer the shirt that your aunt gave you. He denies it at first, but accepts it after you ask him three times. Find a place for him to change. You hold up his ugly shirt, turn around, wipe the tears from your eyes. You turn around and say "You look good now dad"
  • Your mother is diabetic. You need to have a controlled diet. He loves to eat rice. Check out the unsweetened rice available nearby. There you go. Ask for the price. You turn around saying you forgot your wallet.
  • Your brother wants you
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  • It's your cousin's wedding reception. You are there reluctantly. You see your father in an ugly shirt. You offer the shirt that your aunt gave you. He denies it at first, but accepts it after you ask him three times. Find a place for him to change. You hold up his ugly shirt, turn around, wipe the tears from your eyes. You turn around and say "You look good now dad"
  • Your mother is diabetic. You need to have a controlled diet. He loves to eat rice. Check out the unsweetened rice available nearby. There you go. Ask for the price. You turn around saying you forgot your wallet.
  • Your brother wants to be a musician. You see the spark in him. You decide to give him a guitar on his birthday. Get him a second-hand guitar. They both cry with joy!
  • Your cousin (6 years old) is very stubborn. She wants you to take her to a nearby church because she wants to see the decorations. Take it there. He stops at a toy store. She asks you to buy a toy. You lie to him telling him that you will buy a bigger toy after he sees the decorations. She forgets. Take a sigh of relief.
  • He admires a person from his neighborhood. He taught you when you were in tenth grade. You have a deep sense of respect for him. He has guided your career in ways you can't even be grateful for. He is going to get married. Go home. You argue with him that you won't be able to do it. You tell him a lie. He reluctantly admits. You smile and congratulate him.
  • You are in love with childhood. You have been in love with her for over a decade. You tell him your feelings. She keeps you on the hook. She chooses someone else because you don't have a job. You cry and you cry and you cry some more. You accept it eventually.
  • He has a habit of drinking tea at night. One day you don't have a penny in your wallet. You decide to go for a walk. You pass the tea stall in slow motion. You think about tea in your head. The tea seller recognizes you. He offers you tea. You tell him that you have no money. He smiles and offers it to her anyway. That is the best tea you have ever had.
  • One day the mess will end. You don't have enough money to buy you and your little brother some food. You decide to sell your books. The books are out of date. Nobody buys them. Come back empty handed. Your brother understands. You ask your roommates if they have any leftovers. They do not do it. Borrow some potatoes. You boil them. You and your brother have cooked potatoes for lunch.

I could go on. But I guess you get the point.

Edition 1:

First of all, let me thank each and every person for their wishes. You guys made my day.

I am very happy that my answer touched your heart.

I feel so happy, I have felt so good about myself for centuries. The circumstances have been difficult, I agree. But you guys made me realize how great people are deep down. So positive. Very useful. Lovely. So disinterested!

Edition 2:

The events mentioned here are not according to a strict timeline. I graduated from BIT Mesra in 2014. There have been many other things that I have not mentioned. It would not be wrong if I said that by mentioning the above cases, I have barely scratched the surface. If I had to mention all the cases, I would have to write a book!

Some of the above events took place 2-3 years ago.

I found out about my beloved's adventure a fortnight ago.

I was unable to attend my mentor's wedding. It was two days ago.

So I hope all doubts are cleared up!

Thanks!

I have been unemployed since my postgraduate degree for the last 5.5 years. My reason for being unemployed is not a failure, I did not apply for a job even once. During the last year of my PG, I had abdominal pain and from there all the problems begin. Immediately after my PG, I had blood clots in the brain, a mild stroke, and then complications in the spine. He has been in treatment for 2 years. The old case of abdominal pain still to be corrected, I had severe pain in the lower abdomen after a diagnosis uncovered genetic abnormalities that were the deadliest moment for me. It may be due to depression, I had other attacks of headache and spasms. Pelvic p

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I have been unemployed since my postgraduate degree for the last 5.5 years. My reason for being unemployed is not a failure, I did not apply for a job even once. During the last year of my PG, I had abdominal pain and from there all the problems begin. Immediately after my PG, I had blood clots in the brain, a mild stroke, and then complications in the spine. He has been in treatment for 2 years. The old case of abdominal pain still to be corrected, I had severe pain in the lower abdomen after a diagnosis uncovered genetic abnormalities that were the deadliest moment for me. It may be due to depression, I had other attacks of headache and spasms. Pelvic pain, chest pain, IBS -D, susceptible to cancer. In the meantime, One of my friends blamed me for something I never did and that friend shared my number among strangers to threaten me, I was disappointed again. 1 month ago I had an emergency with shortness of breath, I was receiving cardiology treatment. I am now 29 years old. My family and doctors are well aware that my health condition is the reasons behind my unemployment, but society thinks that I am a failure if they do not understand my pain, even if I tell them about my medical conditions.

My many academic friends think that I can't get a job, my relatives think that I am someone who lives off my father's money, a girl I loved left me saying “you are unemployed, don't even show me that you exist in this world, if you are sick or not You have life left so don't bother others because it's your problem ”. I don't care what other people or relatives think of me because only I know what I'm going through, but that girl's behavior was a disappointment because we met in the hospital for the first time in 2010, when we are both students at different universities. . Just because I'm unemployed and she had a job now, she left me with her bitter words.

Job changes people's perspectives for you, but only the person knows the pain they are going through.

Imagine that you are the only baker in a small town of less than a hundred people.

You provide the whole town with fresh bread, baked goods, and all kinds of delicious sweets. When someone needs a good or service or is in your wheelhouse, they come to you.

This goes on for years. Over time, his identity changes from John the Nobody to John the Baker. After several years, your whole identity becomes attached to this person. You are "the baker", and you are highly valued as such.

Then imagine losing all of that.

One day the King comes to your village and decides that he and his people are going to

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Imagine that you are the only baker in a small town of less than a hundred people.

You provide the whole town with fresh bread, baked goods, and all kinds of delicious sweets. When someone needs a good or service or is in your wheelhouse, they come to you.

This goes on for years. Over time, his identity changes from John the Nobody to John the Baker. After several years, your whole identity becomes attached to this person. You are "the baker", and you are highly valued as such.

Then imagine losing all of that.

One day, the King comes to your village and decides that he and his people will take care of the bakery. He is ordered to cease and desist or face life in a prison cell. To make matters worse, you are not compensated for the years you have spent serving your people or for the loss of your business. The King hopes that you and your family will survive alone.

Suddenly:

  • You have no income
  • You have all the free time in the world, but you're not sure what to do with it.
  • You are facing an identity crisis: who are you but John the Baker?
  • You are insanely stressed

At first, you try to have fun doing other things to distract yourself.

You think, "Well, I haven't had a vacation in years."

You start painting, spending time with your family, and taking long walks. For a moment, you find peace and happiness.

But after a few days, the stress starts to sink in.

"How am I going to support my family?"

Instead of doing the things you enjoy, you start fighting to earn money. Activities that you used to do for fun are no longer fun because you need to do them to survive.

You think about being a baker. You don't remember hardships, work, or angry customers, you just miss life on solid ground. Have a purpose. Money. To be needed by the people. And he misses the personal satisfaction that comes with providing for the villagers and his family.

You were once a part of something bigger ... and now you're just a lonely ant far from the colony.

Years ago, in my 20s, I quit my engineering job, got rid of a $ 130,000 salary, and tried to dive into entrepreneurship on my own.

At first, it was exciting: I was in control of my own time and destiny.

But then, like John the Baker, I watched my savings fall into oblivion, and instead of enjoying my new life, I began to feel desperate and resentful. Not to King like John, but to myself for voluntarily quitting my job and my ex-life on solid ground.

Writing changed from a fun experiment to a daily task. I was working hours of 500-1000 word articles every day only to get paid peanuts compared to what I made as an engineer.

He had no idea what he was doing and no longer felt like he was making a difference on a daily basis. No one came to me for advice or help with their problems. I was just desperately pumping out item after item, and still wasn't making enough to stop my bleeding savings.

After living like this for about 8 months, the stress and anxiety became too much for me. I got the first job I could in engineering and immediately felt a huge weight lift off my shoulders.

I was John the Baker again, but I could also write on the sidelines without the stress of trying to survive. Interestingly, it was then that my career as an online writer began to gain ground.

How is life without work?

Stinks.

Manager (coldly): Hi Manalsu, please have a seat.

I sat down on the seat next to her.

I was apprehensive.

Me: Hello.

Manager: So you screwed up my project?

Me (softly): I didn't screw up the project.

Manager (cold anger): How dare you?

I was calm.

Manager: How dare you complain about me?

Me: There have been some operational problems

Manager (now yelling): Scum ... you're a pathetic resource, and you're complaining about me?

Me: I don't like how you talk to me ...

Manager (yelling): I'm going to destroy your career ... I swear ...

I got up.

He was shaking with anger.

Me: I'd like to see you try ...

I stormed out of

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Manager (coldly): Hi Manalsu, please have a seat.

I sat down on the seat next to her.

I was apprehensive.

Me: Hello.

Manager: So you screwed up my project?

Me (softly): I didn't screw up the project.

Manager (cold anger): How dare you?

I was calm.

Manager: How dare you complain about me?

Me: There have been some operational problems

Manager (now yelling): Scum ... you're a pathetic resource, and you're complaining about me?

Me: I don't like how you talk to me ...

Manager (yelling): I'm going to destroy your career ... I swear ...

I got up.

He was shaking with anger.

Me: I'd like to see you try ...

I stormed out of the room.


I resigned the next day.

I left my job without a plan.

I was seething with anger and never wanted to go back to work.

I decided to become an entrepreneur. But he had no business idea. Any.


Two months later, I was sitting at home.

I had thought of starting an online Men’s magazine during my notice period.

But, I didn’t know how to code.

I contacted a few local coders to help me out with the website, but no one gave me a good quality product.

I was sitting idle, and getting frustrated.

I had no choice but to learn to code.

But, I could not finish my product: I changed my track in between, and decided to code a social networking site.


I launched my site after a few months.

It was crappy, and no one joined it.

I became severely depressed. I thought, I had pushed myself into a big ditch.

I had craved for freedom when I was in a corporate setup.

The same freedom ate me from within.

I was losing my sanity.


My girl and I were sitting face to face at a coffee shop.

Girlfriend: So, you want to take up a job?

I nodded.

Girlfriend: Are you sure?

Me (avoiding eye contact): I’m not that smart that I can run a business..

Girlfriend: Fair enough.

Silence for a while.

Girlfriend: What are your strengths?

Me: Don’t know..

Girlfriend: Oh, come on..

Me: Well, I’m okay at writing..

Girlfriend: And?

Me: Telling stories, maybe.

Girlfriend: Maybe? You’ve written tens of stories…

Me (helplessly): But, what do I do with that?

Girlfriend (sips her coffee): That’s for you to think..

I was puzzled.


It has been more than forty months since I left my job.

My fiancee (girlfriend previously) together lead a startup that tells stories.

We are not doing great, but we are growing. Slowly, but surely.

Our lives have a strong sense of purpose as we continue to do what we do great as a team. :)


Life without a job can be very stressful, depressing, and frustrating.

But, there are two sides to this coin as well: life without a job can force you to tread into a path of self discovery.

I’m not saying that you should stop looking for a job, but you can look at that period differently.

You might be headed for a path far more satisfying than the job that you are vying for.

So can you survive without a full-time job, or even with no job at all? You can if you develop enough other sources of income. But it's not that simple. You also have to know how to handle the ups and downs of life without a weekly or monthly paycheck.

. Control Your Expenses

If you want to avoid jobs, it helps to be a bit FRUGAL

But looking for ways to spend less doesn’t have to mean sacrificing anything important. It can be a way to have more of what really matters.

So if you wanta richer lifestyle through frugalitY

, observe cómo gasta su dinero.

And when it comes to living without a regular jo

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So can you survive without a full-time job, or even no job at all? You can if you develop enough other sources of income. But it's not that simple. You also need to know how to handle the ups and downs of life without a weekly or monthly paycheck.

. Control your expenses

If you want to avoid jobs, it helps to be a little FRUGAL

But looking for ways to spend less doesn't have to mean sacrificing anything important. It can be a way to have more of what really matters.

So if you want a richer lifestyle through frugality

Watch how you spend your money.

And when it comes to living without a regular job, you don't always have to think about pinching pennies.

You just have to control your expenses so you spend less than you make. If your income doubles and you spend 50% more, you’re fine, right?

When my wife and I had a higher income, we had a house cleaner, but when our income dropped, we eliminated that luxury.

On the other hand, even when we made six figures, we had a small house that was cheap to heat and maintain, because some expenses are more difficult to eliminate quickly. Here’s the important rule:

Keep your fixed expenses (those you can’t reduce or eliminate quickly) low, and you’ll be able to weather the ups and downs of irregular income.

2. Diversify Your Income

It helps to have many sources of income, so the loss of any one of them won’t send you scurrying for a job. You might write for content websites, sell used books, rent out rooms in your house and make money collecting returnable cans and bottles.

Last year, like the year before, my wife and I had more than 20 sources of income, and not one of them accounted for more than 25% of our total income. Since we controlled expenses and lived on about 75% of our income, we could have lost any one income source and we would still have been OK.

As I explained in my post on income diversification, you should also aim to diversify the types of income you have coming in.

Here’s an example of some of the things we’ve done in recent years in each of the following four types or categories:

1. Business (including freelancing): I make a little money from my websites, I write for blogs, and we both have some royalty income from books.

2. Investments: We lend money to house-flippers, invest in Lending Club loans, have rental income, and we accidentally flipped a condo for a profit. We also made money twice in three years recently by selling our home and buying a cheaper one.

3. Money-Making Projects: We’ve had a couple successful garage sales, I made $4,000 last year from credit card and bank sign-up bonuses, and more than once I’ve I sold stuff taken from a dumpster.e successful garage sales, I made $4,000 last year from credit card and bank sign-up bonuses, and more than once I’ve I sold stuff taken from a dumpster.

4. Temporary Employment (more on this in a moment): My wife occasionally finds work teaching adult education classes, and I briefly had a few jobs four years ago.

You can find many more ways to make money here on The Penny Hoarder, including 103 ways to make money at home (yes, I’m writing this at home in pajamas).

Of course, unless you have a “regular” and successful business (which sounds like a job to me), all of the examples given so far provide somewhat unpredictable income.

That’s why you should…

3. Always Have Money in the Bank

If you have enough money saved, ups and downs in income are not as big a deal.

A few years back, Google search algorithm changes caused our the income from our websites to drop in half in one day, and it continued to slide from more than $10,000 per month to about $200 per month now.

Honestly, I was stressed about that “little” change in our lives. But at least we had saved money during the good times.

You have to decide how much is enough for you, but I wouldn’t feel comfortable if we didn’t have enough savings to pay the bills for a year or two.

And even with money in the bank, my wife and I don’t wait for this or that income stream to dry up before acting. Instead we…

4. Keep Looking for New Sources of Income

I renovated and rented out the other half of a duplex we bought (we lived in the other half). It generated cash flow of about $400 per month.

Now, I’m considering discounted closed-end municipal bond funds as a way to make 6% or better on some other investment money.

You don’t need to get too stressed out about it, but you should keep your eyes open for ways to add to your income sources.

In fact, while this article is about how to live without a job, there are times when you might want to consider getting a paycheck for a while. That’s why I will sometimes…

5. Consider “Employment Projects”

I like to consider jobs as temporary projects. Apart from when you just have no other way to pay the bills, you can use them in two ways:

1. To generate low-stress income while you figure things out.

2. To prepare for future income possibilities.

When our business income was falling like a rock, I freaked out a bit, so I worked as an electric tram driver and later as a security guard. I even worked full time for two weeks at one point.

I discovered that working and having even a small paycheck helped me relax while I figured out what to do next.

It was even fun… but then it got old after a couple months. I quit those jobs and began freelance writing and making money in other ways.

Use jobs to settle your mind and to provide temporary income while you figure out how to make money without a job.

One of those other ways I made money was working for an investor who flipped houses. I was paid only $100 cash per day , but I discovered I like to paint.

That and the other skills I learned later helped me flip a condo, fix our next home (which we sold for a profit) and renovate our duplex rental unit. We also make 10% annual interest lending money to the investor.

Use jobs as a way to learn valuable skills and to make contacts. You can also use a job as training to start your own business.

However you use your jobs, if you do it right, they will be temporary.

6. Have Only Good Debt

“Bad debt” is money you owe for consumer items or anything that doesn’t improve your financial situation.

“Good debt” is income-producing or money-saving debt, such as borrowing for education that improves your ability to make money, borrowing for rental real estate, and even borrowing for your own home — assuming doing so actually cuts your costs versus renting.

The only debt I have at the moment is about $10,000 on a couple of credit cards, but that’s actually good debt. I’m in the zero-interest teaser period, and the money is parked in bank accounts that pay 5% annual interest. Hey, it will only add about $500 to our income this year, but every little bit helps.

Aim to have only good debt if you want to live without a regular job.

7. Plan for Changes

Sometimes you know you’ll be losing income, like when you plan to tell the boss goodbye. See my guide to how to quit your job to prepare for that.

But also prepare for unexpected losses of income. For example, if we move and sell our duplex, I have a list of potential ways to replace the income.

If I can’t keep up with my freelance writing (I’m tired of staring at the computer — and that income is down 50% already), I’ll dig out my plans for making money in other ways.

Just about any income stream can slow or dry up unexpectedly, so make contingency plans.

What will you do if you get injured and can’t work for a while? What will you do if this or that source of income disappears? What if you sell an investment — where will you put the money to generate income?

If you ask yourself the right questions and make a few contingency plans, you’ll have less stress when life happens.

Do that and use the rest of the strategies here, and you can ride the ups and downs of income without ever resorting to a 9-to-5 position.

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