What is life like for Nigerians living in Canada?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Brandon Wood



What is life like for Nigerians living in Canada?

I was a student in Canada more than 35 years ago. Much of what others have written here could have been predictable and Nigerians should be vigilant because the stories of a Canada (or any other nation) where there are no problems is an exaggeration. In all parts of the world, people struggle to survive. In the UK, for example, apart from one Charles and a few other members of his family, most people struggle to survive month after month! Canadians manage every month to balance their family budget (pay heating bills, clear snow, taxes, transportation, mortgage / rent, settle various other bills).

Keep reading

I was a student in Canada more than 35 years ago. Much of what others have written here could have been predictable and Nigerians should be vigilant because the stories of a Canada (or any other nation) where there are no problems is an exaggeration. In all parts of the world, people struggle to survive. In the UK, for example, apart from one Charles and a few other members of his family, most people struggle to survive month after month! Canadians manage every month to balance their household budget (pay heating bills, clear snow, taxes, transportation, mortgage / rent, settle various other bills, etc.) in the US, in addition to these They also avoid bullets (it is their constitutional right to continue avoiding bullets), forest fires and “invasion of migrants”; realizing that a serious illness can ruin their finances as they "salute the flag" and watch for the next prank Trump will throw on them. Nigerians should know that their expectations in Canada or anywhere else in this world should be realistic and benefit from knowing the differences in the culture and systems they are entering. Maybe a little story can help. It is the experience of two of my colleagues in Alberta between 1980 and 1985. Nigerians should know that their expectations in Canada or anywhere else in this world should be realistic and benefit from knowing the differences in the culture and systems they are entering. Maybe a little story can help. It is the experience of two of my colleagues in Alberta between 1980 and 1985. Nigerians should know that their expectations in Canada or anywhere else in this world should be realistic and benefit from knowing the differences in the culture and systems they are entering. Maybe a little story can help. It is the experience of two of my colleagues in Alberta between 1980 and 1985.

Let's call the first man Andrew. Andrew was born in Calgary. His father was a plumber and had training in plumbing and had worked with his late father since he was old enough to do so. He earned a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Alberta but was unable to find work as an academic. He discovered that the hourly wage for a plumber was over $ 40 an hour. Eventually, he kept his Ph.D. on the shelf and went to work as a plumber. He made a comfortable income and had no regrets! Note that Andrew is an "Anglo-Saxon" or "WASP" White Canadian if you know what I mean.

Next comes Nnamdi (not his real name, but a Nigerian person I know). Nnamdi came to Canada with a Master's degree in Chemistry from UNN and was admitted to the doctoral program at the University of Alberta. He was here with his family and had enough assistants to live for the five years it took him to get his doctorate. He never planned to return to Nigeria. Upon graduation, he initially worked as a postdoctoral fellow. That brought him more money than the Graduate Assistantship, but it was not the standard of living he expected. Eventually, even that was over.

Nnamdi found that she could earn a more stable income if she taught chemistry in high school. He returned to obtain the required teacher certificate and was eventually hired as a chemistry teacher. He also went on to live a simple and quiet life and had no complaints. He was happy to be able to put his children in better schools than Nigeria could provide.

Analysis:

One of these people was an immigrant from Nigeria, the other a Canadian of several generations. It was already happening 35 years ago! If you assume that advanced education will automatically place you in a white-collar job and middle-class life in Canada, think again! The opportunities, culture, expectations and society are completely different than what you are used to in Nigeria! That is probably why your system works! You are prepared to be efficient. You can be fired from your job even if you have worked very hard, simply because the economy is slow and your boss believes that the company will benefit if he fires you or closes his section of the company. This doesn't necessarily have anything to do with your face or color! In fact, as long as I have a job,

My children, who currently live in Canada, recently offered me perspective. I think Nigerians should study how Asians, in a generation or two, rise to the middle class in these western countries, while Nigerians can continue to receive assistance for several generations.

One of my daughters, while she was at the University of Canada, had a friend, an Indian. They talked long enough for her to realize that that girl's parents arrived in Canada around the same time that she was born in Canada. They (the girl's parents) only had a high school education compared to me in a PhD program at the time. All they could do was menial jobs and they lived wisely until they could have a store on the corner. The children grew up helping their parents and going to school. When these children reached college, the same parents were able to pay their fees, while my own children needed school loans to survive. In a single generation, Indians with relatively low education had reached middle-class status, while Nigerians are busy accumulating titles and bragging that we are doing so well, ipso facto! Breaking news! Titles are not paid for in Canada! Even with his Ph.D., he keeps quiet at work and performs! If someone with a lower level of education is doing better than you, you could be paid more!

I will conclude with the story of another Nigerian in America. Again, this is a true story:

Musa, a Nigerian with a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering, works for a high-end manufacturing company in Michigan. He joined the company as a junior engineer before pursuing his doctorate at the University of Michigan. Upon completion, he was hired to work in the research branch of the same company and had a six-figure annual income. Then the economy went into recession. As a senior member of staff, he was well informed about the fate of the company.

Then there was, again, this happy Indian foreman who went about his daily routine with joy, as if everything was fine! Musa called him one day and asked him if he knew that the company had less than six months of work left and that it would be closed. Rajiv (let's call him by that name) smiled and told Musa that he was aware of the status of the company. So why was he so happy?

Musa had the shock of his life when Rajiv explained that he already knew that the company was not doing well two years before. He had already made a down payment for a 7-11 store that he was ready to move into and operate to. Surprisingly, he found that he could keep working for nine more months, so he put his brother in that particular store while earning the income to work for another store's down payment. Instead of him running a single store with his brother, they will each run a store and help each other complete the payment!

The examples here are about Nigerian immigrants accumulating certificates of low achievement compared to Asians with less education. When you now bring highly educated Indians, which by the way are several times the number of Nigerians, the story becomes even more interesting. Nigerians abroad often do not cooperate as easily as Asians. Four or more Pakistani IT workers can be so helpful to each other, sharing an apartment, and helping to keep one member unemployed until they all advance in Western society. Nigerians in the same situation are more likely to participate in unhealthy competition. Koreans, Vietnamese, Thais, Indonesians, etc., move into the middle class much faster than Nigerians, no matter how fast we get started. If there is an Olympic medal for the number of titles acquired, Nigeria will win! If it is about entrepreneurship, upward mobility, social integration, etc., it is a different game! When a Chinese opens a restaurant, he is targeting the local western population. The few Nigerians who created Bukas are targeting other Nigerians or Africans like them: between 2% and 5% of the population!

Conclusion.

There are opportunities in western countries for Nigerians and many have done well. There are also hundreds or thousands of Nigerians (doctors, engineers, lawyers, other professionals) who live on the fringes of these societies, but they will NEVER tell the truth to their family and friends at home. This can mislead many who come to know the truth too late and simply add to the number. Nigeria (for various reasons: poor infrastructure, security, opportunities, etc.) is a difficult place to live. Western nations that we find attractive are also (for a different set of reasons: competition, culture, climate, etc.) difficult places to live. The effort required to succeed in these countries can easily be as great as the effort required to succeed in Nigeria. In fact, It is my private opinion that, if you are not an “Okada” or “Maruwa” driver in a Nigerian city, your effort to succeed in most of these countries will be enough to make you successful in Nigeria as well. It is with astonishing perplexity that I hear about young Nigerians with very good jobs, some even already owning their own homes, selling and starting at the bottom of the queue in Canada or the United States. I still can't understand what they really think they will get there! The fact is, you are probably more motivated to work when abroad than you would have been willing to work here in Nigeria. That's just my personal opinion! some even already own their own homes, they are selling and will start at the bottom of the queue in Canada or the United States. I still can't understand what they really think they will get there! The fact is, you are probably more motivated to work when abroad than you would have been willing to work here in Nigeria. That's just my personal opinion! some even already own their own homes, they are selling and will start at the bottom of the queue in Canada or the United States. I still can't understand what they really think they will get there! The fact is, you are probably more motivated to work when abroad than you would have been willing to work here in Nigeria. That's just my personal opinion! That's just my personal opinion! some even already own their own homes, they are selling and will start at the bottom of the queue in Canada or the United States. I still can't understand what they really think they will get there! The fact is, you are probably more motivated to work when abroad than you would have been willing to work here in Nigeria. That's just my personal opinion! That's just my personal opinion! some even already own their own homes, they are selling and will start at the bottom of the queue in Canada or the United States. I still can't understand what they really think they will get there! The fact is, you are probably more motivated to work when abroad than you would have been willing to work here in Nigeria. That's just my personal opinion!

THE REAL TRUTH ABOUT LIVING AND WORKING IN CANADA AS A LEGALLY PERMANENT RESIDENT

Before I begin, I want to make it clear that I am not an agent, I am just an ordinary Nigerian like you who is trying to create a better life for myself and my family.

Earlier this year, all the drama unfolding in the country became really unsettling for me. It got to the point where I began to seriously consider leaving the country,

At this point, I finally made up my mind and made up my mind to search off the shores of this country for a much better life for myself and my family.

So, I started to do a little research on the best plan

Keep reading

THE REAL TRUTH ABOUT LIVING AND WORKING IN CANADA AS A LEGALLY PERMANENT RESIDENT

Before I begin, I want to make it clear that I am not an agent, I am just an ordinary Nigerian like you who is trying to create a better life for myself and my family.

Earlier this year, all the drama unfolding in the country became really unsettling for me. It got to the point where I began to seriously consider leaving the country,

At this point, I finally made up my mind and made up my mind to search off the shores of this country for a much better life for myself and my family.

So, I started to do some research on the best place to go that would suit my goals in life.

So far, it has been very interesting and revealing. This article is the result of some of the most important things I have learned on my journey.

So if you have a strong desire to create a better life for your family outside the shores of this country legally, especially in Canada, then pay close attention to what I am going to say in this post.

Ok, with that out of the way, let's get into the main gist.

Let's talk about the 2 very important things that I have come across on my own journey. Knowing these 2 things:

• Make it easy to process everything in just the next 10 to 12 months, if it's serious, and also,

• Help make life peaceful and prosperous when you get there.

Let's talk about them briefly, shall we?

1) THE REAL TRUTH ABOUT HOW CANADA REALLY TREATS NEW IMMIGRANTS.

Let's forget all the hype for a moment, what exactly is life in Canada like for new immigrants?

So far I have heard a lot of amazing things about Canada. You've probably heard them too.

But he wanted to be really sure that these things were really true before he started doing something.

So I decided to chat with a friend who has been in Canada for about 4-5 years for graduate studies.

Although he actually confirmed this to be true, he was still not satisfied, he also wanted to hear from a Nigerian already living there as a permanent resident.

I finally met a Nigerian online who has been living in Canada as a permanent resident since 2017. He started trying to move since 2010 but wasted hundreds of thousands on agents.

Eventually, he got tired of spending money on agents and took matters into his own hands by trying to do it himself.

He made a lot of mistakes in the process, but he also learned a lot from these mistakes that he made.

After he was able to move around successfully, he then put together a very simple and easy to follow process that any Nigerian can follow and be in Canada in just the next 12 months while avoiding all the mistakes he made.

He put this process into a video presentation that he offered on his site.

I quickly watched this video about 5 times to absorb it all.

So I was finally able to get much deeper and more satisfying answers to all the questions I had.

In fact, the things I got from this video presentation about what Canada really was like and how they treat legal immigrants were actually more mind-blowing than the rumors we've all been hearing.

Here are some of them:

1) Free, high-quality public schools for children that are heavily funded by the Canadian government just to be top-notch.

They are free for up to the equivalent of SS3 here.

Children of legal immigrants who are permanent residents also enjoy this.

2) Monthly stipend for child support. To be honest, I was surprised to hear this, I didn't even know that it was possible for a country's government to do this for its citizens, much less immigrants.

I'm talking about as much as the equivalent of N250k plus per month, depending on how many children one has and their age.

3) High-quality and almost free medical care: nothing like letting people die because there is no money to deposit for the person to start receiving treatment, which is a very common situation here in Nigeria.

And it is so cheap that it is almost free.

4) They help new immigrants to settle through what is called Rent Assistance. This helps to subsidize part of the rental for about a year after your arrival.

And much more that I can't get into right now.

(N / B - By the way, if you're interested in the free video presentation I'm talking about here, I'll tell you how to access it at the end of this article.)

Let's move on to the next point which is ...

2) TOP 3 IMPORTANT THINGS THAT WILL HELP YOU HAVE AN EASY RELOCATION PROCESS AND A PROSPEROUS LIFE IN CANADA

After I was sure of exactly what life in Canada is like for immigrants, the next question on my mind was “What are the things I need to know in order for my relocation process to go smoothly and quickly?

From my research I have discovered 3 things. We will briefly discuss them.

A) The best time to start your relocation process is right now:

Canada has stated that it intends to receive around 1 million immigrants between 2018 and 2021 worldwide. And so far, according to their 2018 reports, they have already admitted about 82,000.

Now, many people may think that "1 million is a big number, I still have time", and they forget that this report was in 2018.

This number should have doubled by now because this is all over the world, not just Nigeria. Also, 2021, which is the deadline is next year,

So if you really want to move to Canada but haven't done anything yet or are lingering, time is already running out.

Also, Canada's immigration policies always change from time to time.

This means that as more people apply, their policies could get stricter, so what may make you log in now may not do so for the next 6 months from now.

The good news is, if you can follow a proven step-by-step plan, you may be ready to go in the next 10 to 12 months.

3) Where you decide to settle in Canada is very important:

Most of the people planning to move to Canada don't know it. This fact alone can affect how quickly your life progresses when you get there.

I know the next question on your mind will be, "So what is the best place then?"

Right?

Well the answer is, it depends. It depends on your particular situation. The best place for me will not be the best place for you.

It is not about choosing a booming place or a place where there are people, or a place that you just like,

So how can you tell which part of Canada is the best place for you? There are 3 factors that are used to decide.

I'll talk about how you can learn this in a minute.

B) How exactly will you and your family support yourself once you get there? You need at least 2-3 solid plans:

Now, as in any other country, you will have to pay fees, invoices and taxes.

So the question is, what concrete plans do you have to support yourself and live a prosperous life there?

Must have at least 2 or 3.

During my research, I read stories of Nigerian professionals, such as doctors, doing menial work because Canada did not really honor their title.

It is very important to know clearly what your options are before leaving Nigeria. And this will be different for everyone depending on their situation.

To get an idea of ​​the options you have, here are some questions to ask yourself:

• Will my degree and work experience be worth it when I arrive?

• What other options do I have?

• Will I need to write some type of professional exam or obtain an additional degree in order for me to be employed?

As you can see, these are not problems that you should take for granted. Most agents will not even discuss this issue despite the outrageous amounts they charge.

Ok so far so good

I've done my best here to sum up these 3 very important things here, but trust me, I'm only scratching the surface here.

But what I'm going to do for you now is direct you to the free video presentation that I mentioned earlier, which is the same presentation that helped me get my own relocation process on track.

This free video presentation covers these 3 critical things that I have briefly explained here in this article in much more detail.

I highly recommend this free video presentation to anyone serious about moving to Canada,

Because not only will it show you exactly what to do to prepare for the next 10-12 months, but you'll also know exactly how to live prosperously once you get there.

If you are interested in viewing this free presentation, please comment YES to this post and I will grant you access to it.

This is exactly what you will learn in this video.

• A proven step-by-step process to avoid all the mistakes and time-wasters and be ready to go in as little as 10-12 months.

• How to know exactly which part of Canada will help your life progress faster when you get there, depending on your own unique situation

• How to quickly get a job to support yourself when you get there.

And much more …

After watching this incredible video, you will finally be able to learn, in great detail, all the things that will help you move to Canada in just the next 10-12 months without spending money on greedy agents.

Commemt YES now to watch the video.

What can anyone say about this? I copied it from a site and need clarification.

I was a doctor in Nigeria, now a cleaner in Canada - Nigerians abroad Lamentations from other Nigerian professionals
Saturday May 30, 2009
People leave their home country with the dream of living a better life. But they tend to ignore the challenges or, more realistically, the obstacles that lie ahead. Not everyone is successful in this endeavor. In this compilation by LAOLU AFOLABI, the tribulations of Nigerian professionals and other foreign nationals in Canada are highlighted.
http://odili.net/news/sou

Keep reading

What can anyone say about this? I copied it from a site and need clarification.

I was a doctor in Nigeria, now a cleaner in Canada - Nigerians abroad Lamentations from other Nigerian professionals
Saturday May 30, 2009
People leave their home country with the dream of living a better life. But they tend to ignore the challenges or, more realistically, the obstacles that lie ahead. Not everyone is successful in this endeavor. In this compilation by LAOLU AFOLABI, the tribulations of Nigerian professionals and other foreign nationals in Canada are highlighted.
http://odili.net/news/source/2009/may/30/606.html
Canada is a land of 10 million square miles. Its population is below 30 million and its growth rate is less than 0.9%. In addition, the neighboring country next door is the United States, which offers enormous job opportunities.
For all these reasons, Canada suffers from a shortage of human resources throughout the year. This country attracts millions of people from all over the world regardless of their religion, beliefs and ideology due to its easy immigration system. Peaceful coexistence and government support have encouraged people from around the world to emigrate to Canada.
Hard reality
Although Canada warmly welcomes new immigrants, the job market is behaving in reverse. The country tends to favor "true Canadians" who are its next generation descendants. New immigrants face the harsh dichotomy inherent in the job market, as it is impossible to get a job without experience in Canada which, in itself, cannot be obtained without a job.
Falling into this vicious cycle, new immigrants give up their last hope of getting a good job. Many immigrants, including taxi drivers, obtained a PhD, but had to do menial jobs, as there was no job for them.
This is a fairly common phenomenon, which scares new applicants. Although this is not a very common situation, every applicant should bear in mind that they must go through a series of difficulties to get the desired jobs. The applicant must be mentally and physically prepared for a long struggle to see himself in the desired position.
In Canada, services in various sectors, such as engineering, medicine and education, are maintained by the respective regulatory bodies through various laws. That is why a person seeking work as an engineer must obtain a professional engineering license; Medical professionals, like physicians, must go through a lengthy process to obtain Physician of Canada certification; nurses must take a certified test; for accountants, the CMA certificate is mandatory; for teachers at the primary and secondary level, a teacher's certificate is required; IT specialists must acquire certificates in various modules; pharmacists require a pharmacy certification.
The boldness, perseverance and tenacity of many Nigerians, coupled with their native intelligence, often result in the emergence of highly capable and exceptionally intelligent high achievers. When the playing field is level, Nigerians have the ability to shine in many areas of human endeavor, particularly in the 'professions', i.e. accounting, law, academics, computer science, medicine, education, engineering, etc. brochure of any US high school or university with Nigerian students and look at their rankings.
It is a great irony for many in the field of immigration, and for newcomers, a bitter joke. Canada has a shortage of trained professionals, yet thousands of internationally trained doctors, engineers, teachers, and nurses are forced to deliver pizza and drive taxis.
“What makes me angry is that we are capable people. We have the credentials. We just can't get the jobs, ”complained a Nigerian, who feels the government has shattered his hopes and dreams.
Last year, when Canada changed the way it selects immigrants, many were happy to see the end of the old system, which paired newcomers with a shortage of workers. Now, Canada chooses immigrants not because of their occupation, but because of their education, skills and language skills. Applicants must score 67 out of 100 possible points to be accepted.
Apparently being talented and smart should make them more employable. But it is not working that way. Canada is recruiting the right kind of people, but they are caught in a bottleneck as agencies and bodies that regulate the fields of Medicine, Teaching and Nursing struggle to assess their qualifications.
"We have a disaster on our hands," says Joan Atlin, executive director of the Ontario Association of International Physicians and Surgeons.
“There are thousands of underemployed foreign professionals throughout the country. At the same time, we have a shortage of trained professionals, especially in the health field. We don't have so much a shortage of physicians as a bottleneck in evaluation and licensing, ”he said.
A recent statistic in Canada that studies 164,200 immigrants who arrived between 2000 and 2001 found that 70 percent had trouble entering the workforce. Six out of 10 were forced to accept jobs other than those for which they were trained. The two most common occupational groups for men were Science (natural and applied) and Management, but most ended up working in sales and service or processing and manufacturing.
There was a conference on the subject of the Canadian experience and was attended by dozens of professionals trained from abroad, some Nigerian bankers, doctors and engineers who are not working in their professions.
At the conference, the lamentations were, in short: "We are highly trained men and women who came to Canada and we are not allowed to do what we were trained to do." People who want to come to Canada are not told what to expect.
At the conference, a banker said: “When I applied, I had to qualify. There are brands for experience, education, etc. You have to get 70 marks. I got 72. When I got here, I discovered that my degrees were worthless, useful only for working in a cold room. I left a banking job in Nigeria and here, even though I lived in a foreign country, a dream of many years, I was not fulfilled ”.
Also, one doctor said: “I never knew it would be difficult to get a medical license here. But I don't know if it would be such a bureaucratic, daunting, and ultimately fruitless journey. I submitted my application to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons two and a half years ago and have not even received a response. I was worried that my file might get lost in a drawer. I'm ready to go anywhere, even rural Saskatchewan, small town Ontario.
“After getting certified as a doctor in Nigeria, I got a job here as a cleaner. It is so disturbing. Every time some of the doctors here have a problem, they come to me for help.
They know what I can do, but for them, I have not obtained the Canadian qualification. "I've been cleaning the hospital here, in fact, I've even been a babysitter," she lamented. Another doctor in the meeting had once applied for a job as a healthcare worker. The answer was "sorry, you are overqualified". Then the doctor applied for a job as a medical secretary and was told that 30 words per minute was not good enough and, in any case, where is the diploma in secretarial skills? One final insult, the doctor couldn't get a job as a personal support worker: No experience, no qualifications.
Other foreign professionals in that country also know the experience. In their home countries they are engineers, teachers, doctors and businessmen. Now they drive taxis.
Leon Kalemkerian
Leon Kalemkerian, an engineer in Iraq, drives a limousine in Toronto. "It doesn't take time for a dream to turn into a nightmare," Kalemkerian said.
The now 59-year-old electronics engineer immigrated from Iraq in 1995 to provide a better life and more opportunities for his three children, and a job for himself. Kalemkerian has been driving limousines for nine years. He said he did everything he could to have his qualifications recognized in Canada. “They told me that I have a good work experience but that I should have a Canadian education,” Kalemkerian said. Although he completed Ethics and Law courses at the University of Toronto, that was not enough.
Reza Hosseinioun
"Everything about the economy is fascinating," says Mohammad Reza Hosseinioun. Hosseinioun, who goes by the name Reza, has a Ph.D. in economics and now drives a taxi in Toronto. It is not what he wanted to do, but in the absence of choice, it is what he was forced to do. Reza, 54, was born and raised in Mashad, Iran. In 1981, he went to India to study Economics at the University of Bhopal (now known as Barkatullah University of Bhopal). He completed his PhD in 1988, after which he came to Canada and applied for refugee status. But in Canada, his dream failed.
Tejpal Bath
Days after graduating, Tejpal Bath was offered the job of her dreams: living in a village and taking care of cows, buffalo and horses. Bath, 35, was a veterinarian in North India. In Canada, you drive a taxi. Bath studied Veterinary Science at Punjab Agricultural University in North India, graduating in 1997 after five grueling years. The work was satisfactory. But in 2001, he visited his brother in Toronto and met some old friends. He returned home, opened a small animal clinic, and applied for immigration at the same time. The clinic was going well, but he and his wife decided to try Canada. They and their son, who is now nine years old, moved there in 2006. He took the first qualification test for a veterinary license, but failed. He drove a truck for a while.
Chamkaur Singh Dhaliwal
At 36, Chamkaur Singh Dhaliwal was the youngest professor of Agricultural Entomology at a university in North India. Roughly 17 years later, he's one of dozens of taxi drivers waiting for fares at Pearson Airport. Dhaliwal joined as an assistant professor in the Department of Entomology at Punjab Agricultural University in Ludhiana, India, in 1980, and became a professor in 1996. It was a good life and Dhaliwal and his wife, Savinder, a school principal, were there. happy. Two weeks after the family landed in Toronto, Dhaliwal went to the University of Guelph. His doctorate was recognized, but he was unable to find a job. He chose to become a real estate agent. That was fine until the market went down. With a family to support and a mortgage to pay, Dhaliwal decided to drive a taxi.

Are these statements about Canada true? And to what extent?

As the saying goes, it is NOT always greener on the other side. With all the noise that Canada is the best place to settle and all that, I was a little disappointed in what we found. As a family of 5, we were very excited about the prospect of a new beginning and a better life here in Canada. Together with my wife and 3 children we decided to move to Canada after facing a number of problems at home that were beyond our control. We arrived in mid-February 2018 which was roughly one of the coldest times of the year, we stumbled our way through the bitter cold feeling blessed to be among the lucky few

Keep reading

As the saying goes, it is NOT always greener on the other side. With all the noise that Canada is the best place to settle and all that, I was a little disappointed in what we found. As a family of 5, we were very excited about the prospect of a new beginning and a better life here in Canada. Together with my wife and 3 children we decided to move to Canada after facing a number of problems at home that were beyond our control. We arrived in mid-February 2018 which was roughly one of the coldest times of the year, we stumbled our way through the bitter cold feeling, blessed to be among the lucky few who arrived in Canada in the mist of millions. of Nigerians. harboring such dreams. One month after our arrival in Toronto, Canada, the harsh realities of life in Canada are beginning to show. The first thing that struck us was how expensive commodities are compared to the US If you have a minimum wage, there is no way you can afford a decent life or accommodation, even if you and your wife are working and Unfortunately, those are the kinds of jobs that are readily available to newcomers. The rent is astronomically high and even if you can afford it, you still have to pray that the landlord will pick you out of maybe 5 or 6 applicants who are competing for the same home. In the last three months we have applied for and inspected more than 8 properties and the owner would say, I will call you and they never will. Until now we have lived practically to the day, our base salary of $ 15 CAD per hour is not enough to get through the month. we're still huddled in our one-bedroom basement apartment, which is too small for us. Getting a 3-bedroom apartment costs around $ 2,400 - $ 2,800 and based on our current combined salary, we still can't afford it. What this simply means is that Canada currently has a housing crisis that they are willing to admit to and if you are a family on minimum wage, Toronto is definitely not for you. Don't even get me started on things like internet data and how expensive it is or car insurance that goes through the roof once you're the first time. Unlike Nigeria, where you can receive free calls once you have a SIM card, in Canada you must pay only to have the privilege of receiving calls. We are currently thinking of moving to smaller cities around Ontario where the rent is a bit cheaper, but without work or maybe moving entirely to a new region like Alberta where it is colder. Either way you look at it, the situation is dire and a bit hostile to new immigrants.

It is more difficult for my children who have not seen anything called mental rest since we embarked on emigrating to Canada. Since we started this journey it has been movement from one place to another and it has been almost 2 years and we have not settled down yet. Many times I look back and regret why I made this trip, but again, coming home is not more welcoming either, especially with the horrible stories emanating from Nigeria that only make you reinforce your spirit of suffering and smile. In short, life is not bed and roses here in Canada, every day is a struggle. But what I hope is that if you do the hustle right, Calm will come after the Storm.

First of all, as a Nigerian living in Canada, you will notice that there is a huge difference between your life at home and here in Canada.

Everything from public transportation to healthcare has a well-defined system. Having said that, I think it is best to highlight a few points for you below:

  1. Weather: The weather is completely different! If you know you can't survive -40 degree Celsius weather sometimes (Edmonton, Alberta), you may want to rethink your options. You must learn to adapt quickly with the help of thermal clothing and fleece-lined jackets.
  2. Social life: Depending
Keep reading

First of all, as a Nigerian living in Canada, you will notice that there is a huge difference between your life at home and here in Canada.

Everything from public transportation to healthcare has a well-defined system. Having said that, I think it is best to highlight a few points for you below:

  1. Weather: The weather is completely different! If you know you can't survive -40 degree Celsius weather sometimes (Edmonton, Alberta), you may want to rethink your options. You must learn to adapt quickly with the help of thermal clothing and fleece-lined jackets.
  2. Social life: Depending on your personality, it can be very difficult for you to have a social life here. Make no mistake, Canadians are the most hospitable people in the world, but as I said at the beginning, things are very different here. The best way to keep up with your social life is to plan outings, excursions, and dinners with your coworkers or classmates. Nightlife is also quite important here (especially in the main cities).
  3. Culture: diversity is highly encouraged here. This means that you will meet people from practically every corner of the world. Personally, I love that because you get to listen and share experiences with different people (and you might get addicted to their food too!).
  4. Food: Getting Nigerian food here is way too expensive! My first trip to the African store cost me over $ 80 and I barely got 5 items. Have a meeting with your taste buds before you leave Nigeria… hahaha (PS: you might not find an African store “easily”, unless you live in one of the major cities).
  5. PAY YOUR TAXES !!!! Yes, I literally had to "capitalize" on that because I know that some Nigerians don't pay their taxes. Here, you pay what is called “General Sales Tax (GST)” every time you make a purchase. For example, if a book is priced at "$ 10", when you pay the store manager, you will have to pay 5% or 13% of the $ 10 + $ 10 = $ 10.5 (5% GST) or $ 11.3 (13% GST). Currently, the province of Ontario has the highest GST (13%).
  6. Medical care is literally free. Well, you don't really have to worry about malaria, but on the plus side, you may not have to pay any hospital bills (as long as that particular treatment is covered by your provincial healthcare bill).

Basically that's all I can say for now. As long as you are hard-working, law-abiding, friendly, and smart, you will definitely enjoy your time in Canada.

UPDATE: As Ikenna pointed out to me in the answer section, Nova Scotia has the highest sales tax in Canada (15%).

UPDATE: As Bill said in the comment section, healthcare is not free. It is paid with the taxes we pay, hence another important reason for you to pay your taxes.

Thanks for all the comments and upvotes :)

I can't really answer the question because I haven't been to Canada before. But I guess I can give it a try as someone whose older brother and family have lived there for the last 13 years.

My older brother moved his family to Calgary in 2005. He had been working with Chevron in Nigeria for 15 years before. But then he resigned his position at Chevron and moved to Canada. So I guess Canada must have been a big deal for him to have made that decision.

He has three children and the last one was born in Canada, which is a fairly large family by Western standards. Now they own a house and as in the

Keep reading

I can't really answer the question because I haven't been to Canada before. But I guess I can give it a try as someone whose older brother and family have lived there for the last 13 years.

My older brother moved his family to Calgary in 2005. He had been working with Chevron in Nigeria for 15 years before. But then he resigned his position at Chevron and moved to Canada. So I guess Canada must have been a big deal for him to have made that decision.

He has three children and the last one was born in Canada, which is a fairly large family by Western standards. They now own a home and, like the last time I was in contact with them, they were doing quite well.

Canada is a prosperous country. From what I gathered and read about the place, it is one of the best and safest countries to live in. It has a good quality healthcare system and there are many job opportunities there. In addition, Canada needs people, especially skilled and professional workers.

Canada does not suffer from natural disasters. No tsunami, no earthquakes, no mudslides ... no bad stuff. And the people? Nice and easygoing.

Lastly, the best thing about Canada is that you can make it your home and love it.

Thanks for the A2A.

Frankly, I'm not qualified to give an answer on any substance, but I won't let that stop me :) It would be much better to ask a Nigerian living in Canada.

I am a third generation Canadian with Scottish roots. I am not a minority and English is not my second language. My experiences and perspectives are based on that, which is unlikely to be yours.

I have worked with people from all over the world: South Africa, Cameroon, Nigeria, Philippines, China, Hong Kong, Poland, Russia, India, Vietnam, Thailand, Laos, Mexico, Venezuela and other places that I am sure of.

Keep reading

Thanks for the A2A.

Frankly, I'm not qualified to give an answer on any substance, but I won't let that stop me :) It would be much better to ask a Nigerian living in Canada.

I am a third generation Canadian with Scottish roots. I am not a minority and English is not my second language. My experiences and perspectives are based on that, which is unlikely to be yours.

I have worked with people from all over the world: South Africa, Cameroon, Nigeria, Philippines, China, Hong Kong, Poland, Russia, India, Vietnam, Thailand, Laos, Mexico, Venezuela and other places that I am sure forgotten. In each case, their lives were largely what they chose to make of them. Many were entrepreneurs and owned successful businesses, several were highly trained engineers, machinists, electronic technicians, a pastor, a quality control specialist, a gentleman from Cameroon became a nurse.

Of course, there are cultural differences, and the weather will surprise you no matter how much you think you understand the concept of cold.

I moved from England to Canada 11 years ago. It was initially a struggle but it got better. Coming from England, you might think things will be fine, but the weather still got to me and I still am. I think Toronto is an expensive place to live. You need to move to a place like Alberta where there are more jobs and cheaper housing. Your children need to settle down. I know it finds Toronto cold, Alberta will be colder. There are days when I say to myself 'send me to come to this country'. The good news is that children adapt easily. I remember taking my children where layers and layers

Keep reading

I moved from England to Canada 11 years ago. It was initially a struggle but it got better. Coming from England, you might think things will be fine, but the weather still got to me and I still am. I think Toronto is an expensive place to live. You need to move to a place like Alberta where there are more jobs and cheaper housing. Your children need to settle down. I know it finds Toronto cold, Alberta will be colder. There are days when I say to myself 'send me to come to this country'. The good news is that children adapt easily. I remember I wore my kids in layers and layers of clothing when they went to school and they kept telling me that no one else dresses like that and they were sweating like crazy before leaving the house. They return home with all their layers of clothing on their arms.

Looking back I don't regret it. Over time, you will get high paying jobs, if necessary, one of you should improve your grades by going back to school or changing careers. It will be a great sacrifice, but at the end of the day you will be smiling. Sacrifice will mean that you remain a parent, spouse, worker, and student. Best of luck for the future

I have never been to Canada, but I have interacted with many people (including Nigerians) who live in Canada.

Life in a developed western country like Canada is bound to be relatively good for anyone compared to living in a self-destructive Third World country like Nigeria. I live in a country many refer to as backyard Europe and while not as developed as western nations, it is still a notable improvement in Nigeria.

Canada is a welcoming country, Canadians are one of the friendliest people in the world. If any Nigerian is legally residing in Canada and is a productive and law-abiding resident of Canada,

Keep reading

I have never been to Canada, but I have interacted with many people (including Nigerians) who live in Canada.

Life in a developed western country like Canada is bound to be relatively good for anyone compared to living in a self-destructive Third World country like Nigeria. I live in a country many refer to as backyard Europe and while not as developed as western nations, it is still a notable improvement in Nigeria.

Canada is a welcoming country, Canadians are one of the friendliest people in the world. If any Nigerian legally resides in Canada and is a productive and law-abiding resident of the country, I am sure that life will be for them as it is for the natives. I'm sure racism should be relatively low compared to other nations, not to mention the names (EE).

Great and full of opportunities if you move here legally. but it can get boring.

A snapshot of myself as an adopted son (immigrant) from Canada would mean getting a major grant from the provincial government in less than 5 months of landing as an immigrant. Getting such a scholarship from the Nigerian government or your state is almost impossible without "connection". However, I still miss meeting almost everyone on my street in Lagos, parties, family and friends.

So please enter legally and keep your strong Nigerian rush spirit. You are destined to succeed here as a Nigerian if you enter legally.

Jah bless

Keep reading

Great and full of opportunities if you move here legally. but it can get boring.

A snapshot of myself as an adopted son (immigrant) from Canada would mean getting a major grant from the provincial government in less than 5 months of landing as an immigrant. Getting such a scholarship from the Nigerian government or your state is almost impossible without "connection". However, I still miss meeting almost everyone on my street in Lagos, parties, family and friends.

So please enter legally and keep your strong Nigerian rush spirit. You are destined to succeed here as a Nigerian if you enter legally.

Jah bless!

I guess it must be difficult due to the weather, still Canada must have something good when so many Nigerians come here despite the long winters. In any case, they are not obliged to stay here, they can return to Nigeria at any time, and if they manage to return after obtaining Canadian citizenship, then they have a great benefit: they can travel all over the world without the need for a visa (something not can be done with a Nigerian passport). People must understand that emigration is not for everyone, you have to make an effort to establish yourself and restart a new life, immigrants have to make that effort.

Keep reading

I guess it must be difficult due to the weather, still Canada must have something good when so many Nigerians come here despite the long winters. In any case, they are not obliged to stay here, they can return to Nigeria at any time, and if they manage to return after obtaining Canadian citizenship, then they have a great benefit: they can travel all over the world without the need for a visa (something not can be done with a Nigerian passport). People must understand that emigration is not for everyone, you have to make an effort to settle down and restart a new life, immigrants have to make that effort, they cannot expect everything to be provided for them. You cannot expect things to be the way they are in Nigeria, this is a different country and we receive immigrants from all over the world,

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.