What is life like for an Indian after getting a job in Germany after MS in Germany?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Jordan Powell



What is life like for an Indian after getting a job in Germany after MS in Germany?

Thanks for A2A Sai Prasanna.

I'm still studying and therefore haven't started a job yet, so maybe I'm not the best person to answer this question. But I have some friends who are working in Germany after having completed their masters in Germany, and I will try to share their experience.

The first thing to know is that most of us who come here stay in Germany. It is easier to obtain a work visa and subsequently citizenship in Germany (than in the US, Australia, the UK, and many other developed countries) for students who completed their M.Sc. in Germany, and therefore stay in Germany (or go

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Thanks for A2A Sai Prasanna.

I'm still studying and therefore haven't started a job yet, so maybe I'm not the best person to answer this question. But I have some friends who are working in Germany after having completed their masters in Germany, and I will try to share their experience.

The first thing to know is that most of us who come here stay in Germany. It is easier to obtain a work visa and subsequently citizenship in Germany (than in the US, Australia, the UK, and many other developed countries) for students who completed their M.Sc. in Germany, so staying in Germany (or returning to India) is often more a matter of choice than being forced to return.

The first thing all Indian students do (or should do, ideally) is learn the German language. It is as essential for professional growth as it is for everyday life. You may have heard stories about people living here without any knowledge of German, but that is the exception rather than the rule. Don't try to bend the rules until you have concrete work experience.

People learn to be efficient and learn to adhere to rules and regulations without being forced to do so. Work life is not as hectic as in India, but everyone is supposed to be very proficient at what they do.

By the way, I think Germans are a lot more fun than you think. The simple act of making memes about themselves shows that they have humor.

The standard of living is definitely high, and Germany is a heavy economic weight in the eurozone, as well as the engine of growth for almost all of Europe, the job opportunities are sufficient. But you still have to fight and apply for tons of positions, and so don't expect to pass once you're in Germany, expect to learn harder than ever and party a lot harder too!

ヽ (⌐ ■ _ ■) ノ ♪ ♬

There are people of very different nationalities and you don't really feel isolated. Having said that, most people find and form tight-knit groups within their own nationalities / races and take care of each other, like a giant family. Although that has its own benefits, I would rather suggest that you keep good friends with the Germans, and you will come to enjoy Germany in a way that only they can show you how!

Everyone eventually falls in love with beer and has a favorite pub / bar that he swears by. But most Indians also learn the healthy German lifestyle and become much more health conscious than their Indian counterparts. Generally, most Indians lose weight (or at least want to) after coming to Germany, simply by following a healthy lifestyle.

Even less formally interested people become, at least in part, knowledgeable about football, since people talk about it everywhere. Stereotypes exist for a reason, people.

¯ \ _ (ツ) _ / ¯

Indians roam all over Europe. Much. And many of them take too many pictures. Much. And post it on Facebook. Much.

Very few Indians end up marrying people of other nationalities, but there are some exceptions.

In general, life is good. You get to meet highly efficient people of very high caliber, both from India and from other nations. Most of the Indians who have come this far are really motivated and inspiring people and therefore the level of motivation is high everywhere. Again, people work hard and have enough time and resources to have more fun.

And last but definitely not least, there is beauty everywhere. Vegetation, summer, snow, cities, farms, rivers, children and, most importantly for us young people: girls (and vice versa)!


Edit- As requested by Ayush Sharma.

The most common problem is getting contacts for the first job. Once you have that, the rest you can build based on your skills. But that first chance, that first chance, is necessary.

Language, again, is a big problem for everyone. Try to learn as much as you can, and getting a head start when in India will definitely help you.

People have trouble adjusting to culture sometimes, but that's not a big deal. Usually it only brings you closer to new experiences.

We miss home cooking, but you usually meet someone kind enough to help you out, inviting you to dinner frequently.

Vegetarians have an exceptionally high number of problems with food, as does anyone else who is unwilling to eat beef / pork. They are found everywhere in Germany.

Some also suffered minor racial attacks, but almost nothing of consequence. Germans are a very sweet people, once they get to know you better!


Reedit (Reddit ??) - Now I work in Germany and have a relaxed life. Basically all my friends are working too. I work 35 hours a week (when I'm not wasting time on Quora, like now), I have cool, laid-back colleagues (coffee breaks!), I earn more than enough to be happy, I have laid-back health insurance that allows me be useless. treatments (I had my inner ear checked yesterday: P) and to top it all, I enjoy my nights like never before!

Of course, I just started, therefore there is still that annoying visa problem that foreigners face in every country. But I'm not really worried about it: I only need to work for 21 months (finding work also becomes much easier now that I already have a small former German worker), and then I will have a permanent residence that allows me to relax and not go to what extend my visa from time to time!

After repeated requests, I have created a YouTube channel describing my life here in Germany and how to go on and search for admissions / jobs here. Feel free to check it out and ask any questions you may have about the video itself (on the YouTube channel).

Having worked in many countries including Germany, USA and Asian countries, sharing my general experience for Indians in Germany. It is not necessarily for German MS / MBA / PhD holders, but life in general for Indians.

It mainly depends on what stage of life you are in and what you are expecting while you are here. For students, life is much easier compared to families with children. For working professionals, it varies according to family composition and individual circumstances. Below are the generic looks you will find. Wherever applicable I have put details for categories like students, singles / working singles

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Having worked in many countries including Germany, USA and Asian countries, sharing my general experience for Indians in Germany. It is not necessarily for German MS / MBA / PhD holders, but life in general for Indians.

It mainly depends on what stage of life you are in and what you are expecting while you are here. For students, life is much easier compared to families with children. For working professionals, it varies according to family composition and individual circumstances. Below are the generic looks you will find. Where applicable, I have put details for categories such as students, working singles, and families.

Language - As you may have already read in every thread on each site, knowing the local language is a must if you intend to stay longer. The ability and adaptability to learn a new language decreases with age and experience. Twenty-year-olds find it easier than thirty-year-olds. And make no mistake, it is not an easy language to master even with a twenty chance to converse like native German. You will handle a basic conversation if you put in the effort for a few months. If your work schedule is crowded, more than 8 hours of work wear you out, then attending language classes is not easy. Thinking that learning a language makes you socially acceptable and culturally integrated is a big mistake. It just isn't so. You might hear that from recent graduates, Since your circle of interaction is limited to college friends, it is far from the truth if you are looking for an extended family stay. One very encouraging thing is that most of the government officials you have to deal with to get settled speak English and are kind to you. Unfortunately that's where it ends.

Climate - This is a huge disadvantage compared to India. Back home, you can venture out regardless of rain, sun, or cold; You just have to bring an umbrella, sunglasses / cap or jacket. Life is really tough in winters. You can't go out, you can't visit any place, you'll want to stay home no matter how bored you are. Summers are much better, but unfortunately very few days. This is where the rest of the European immigrants are in advantage, for them it is the same!

Food: if you cook and hardly depend on food from outside, you will not have problems. Many Indian / Asian stores offer what you need. If you rely heavily on food from outside, it will be a major problem. For non-vegetarians, few options other than vegetables, but times are still tough.

Cost of living and lifestyle - If you compare the ratio of income to expenses, the cost of living is quite high in Germany, especially in large cities. An average person with more than 5 years of experience earns between 50 and 60,000, 10+ men are in the range of 60,000 to 75,000, 15+ men between 75,000 and 110,000. This varies by location, domain, or individual, but 90% are within these ranges. In the United States, wages are much higher, as in Thailand, Canada, and Singapore. Compared to India, your monthly savings decrease as your experience increases (yes, even after converting from Euro to INR). Also, the taxes are very high compared to other countries where I worked. In short, Germany is not a payment pattern and does not expect significant savings. Your motto should be: I earn, I spend, I enjoy a lifestyle that I will never have at home again. Public transportation, infrastructure is amazing. Germans are efficient and know the art of doing things correctly. If you don't enjoy the lifestyle there and are just looking to save, then you are in the wrong place. Work-life balance is excellent. You can visit any place of your interest in Europe (on days allowed by the weather). Of course, in summer the tourist places cost a lot and transport is always expensive. So plan accordingly well in advance. Germans are efficient and know the art of doing things correctly. If you don't enjoy the lifestyle there and are just looking to save, then you are in the wrong place. Work-life balance is excellent. You can visit any place of your interest in Europe (on days allowed by the weather). Of course, in summer the tourist places cost a lot and transport is always expensive. So plan accordingly well in advance. Germans are efficient and know the art of doing things correctly. If you don't enjoy the lifestyle there and are just looking to save, then you are in the wrong place. Work-life balance is excellent. You can visit any place of your interest in Europe (on days allowed by the weather). Of course, in summer the tourist places cost a lot and transport is always expensive. So plan accordingly well in advance.

Summary: In general, if you are a student who shares a room with others or joined the workforce with less than 5 years, it makes more sense for you to stay. If you are married and your wife / husband enjoys cooking and taking care of the choir in the house, you will have a more pleasant life than that of India. If you are not in the above categories, it will be difficult to stay. If you have young children, life will be more difficult, getting a doctor's appointment, dealing with insurance, etc. requires German language skills (doctors do speak English) and unfortunately there is no escape there! If your children go to school, this adds another layer of inconvenience, both when moving and when moving out of the country. Sadly, I have witnessed the disappointment of many Indian families returning after many years of stay. If you are a tech savvy with 10+ years of experience, life is more rewarding in the US / Canada (even India) than here, so be very careful. On the other hand, if you don't want to stay in India and not find a job in the US / Canada, Germany is a better option. Just a trend observation, more and more single Indian women prefer to migrate here in recent years.

Disclaimer: This is based solely on my work experience in more than 4 countries, each at least one year. This is for guidance only to help other Indian friends make informed decisions. I don't expect all readers to agree. Without prejudice towards anything or anyone.

Answer to How is the life of an Indian after getting a job in Germany after MS in Germany?

Hello there,

I have been in Germany since December 2015, I started with my German teaching, followed by my Master in Fahrzeugbau (Automotive Engineering) at HAW Hamburg, which I finished with a one-year internship at Continental AG in Hannover. Since November 2019 it joined the leading engineering services provider called AKKA in Leipzig / Magdeburg, specifically for the automotive sector.

(Source: https://www.pexels.com/photo/person-in-black-suit-hired-an-employee-3760069/)

Money and time

I

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Answer to How is the life of an Indian after getting a job in Germany after MS in Germany?

Hello there,

I have been in Germany since December 2015, I started with my German teaching, followed by my Master in Fahrzeugbau (Automotive Engineering) at HAW Hamburg, which I finished with a one-year internship at Continental AG in Hannover. Since November 2019 it joined the leading engineering services provider called AKKA in Leipzig / Magdeburg, specifically for the automotive sector.

(Source: https://www.pexels.com/photo/person-in-black-suit-hired-an-employee-3760069/)

Money and time

It is clear that as a student in Germany you can survive, you get everything you need, but still, money problems will always be there unless you belong to a wealthy family. Otherwise, you would always be looking for part-time jobs all the time, which makes you very busy during your student life. From now on, by getting a job that pays you well, you will feel completely free, especially on weekends, you will have a lot of time to do other things that you have always thought about. If I only compare how much he was earning during his student life in 2 months, it would be deposited into his account at the end of the month it feels so good. Normally in Germany, employment contracts are 35 to 40 hours a week, and many companies do not have fixed hours, so you can plan your week yourself, this flexibility allows you to have the perfect balance in your work life. I have a colleague from France at my new job who likes to get some rest after lunch, so he stays home for 1-2 hours and works late at night, nobody says anything about it. This freedom cannot be bought to the best of my knowledge in any other country.

Paid vacations

As a student you don't have many options for your trips, I used to go to my job with budget trip planner like PM2AM Students trips and other similar concepts, where you can travel on weekends on a busy (for some people) bus trip saving the cost of overnight stay. After landing a job, you can plan almost 28 to 30 days of paid vacation without thinking about work anymore. Another of the best things you get with the money you get in your account at the end of the month. In many countries you can earn more, but having time to use that earned money is complicated, here you will be encouraged or sometimes forced to go on vacation and use your 30 days as well.

Maternity / paternity leave

Under the new rules, employees will be entitled to request up to 24 months of paid parental leave (instead of 12 months) or, if both parents decide to go on parental leave, they will be entitled to 28 months of paid parental leave (instead of 14 months) to share between parents.

Parental leave

I am single, so I have not enjoyed the benefits of the licenses mentioned above, but since I was writing about paid vacations, this should also be mentioned here. Check some authentic source, I found this blog as of now. There may be some bugs, but I'll let it be here.

Dating and marriage

Just for fun, but I'll still mention this here. Once you get the job with those magic figures as salary. Her profile will get a lot of attention, mainly from the girl's parents, albeit on marriage sites. We Indians don't have a dating culture like the western world, but your circle will start advertising by word of mouth for you. I have noticed the big difference before and after getting Job.

Yourself

After staying 2 years normally for your MS, you may have adopted the German work culture, and if not, you will do so now during your work. Act more responsibly about homework and due dates. Work with future plans and everything is part of your life. You have found new friends in the workplace, with whom you find some extra activities or some sport. You are responsible for your work, no boss will act like a boss in Hollywood movies, you will work more collaboratively, which is what you should learn while working in Germany. You will go to restaurants more often because you no longer worry about money, you enjoy life to the fullest. You can make your driver's license if you have not done it as a student,

These are the things that came to my mind while writing and thinking about this particular question, apart from the fact that we Indians will always be the way we used to be, getting a job can have a great influence on your finances and lifestyle, but inside you will be still that cute indian boy / girl who has a bag full of other bags besides the kitchen door.

Check out the animated version of this answer on my Youtube channel. The link is in the comment.

If something comes to mind or you want to suggest / convey something, just comment below, we will reply as soon as possible.

Thank you for reading.

(https://www.pexels.com/photo/bank-note-banknote-banknotes-bill-259251/)

It will be amazing.

Your career is skyrocketing. You will have a 6-digit offer directly from the university. Better yet, your entire salary will be exempt from tax by the German government. The company will roll out a red carpet in his honor on the first day. You can get promotions every 6 months. You will be granted 3 months of paid vacation each year and you will be required to work only from 10 am to 8 pm. M. At 4 p. M., Monday through Thursday. The Indian Embassy will invite you to honor their achievements. YouTube and Instagram influencers will ask you for an interview on their channels.

Sounds too

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It will be amazing.

Your career is skyrocketing. You will have a 6-digit offer directly from the university. Better yet, your entire salary will be exempt from tax by the German government. The company will roll out a red carpet in his honor on the first day. You can get promotions every 6 months. You will be granted 3 months of paid vacation each year and you will be required to work only from 10 am to 8 pm. M. At 4 p. M., Monday through Thursday. The Indian Embassy will invite you to honor their achievements. YouTube and Instagram influencers will ask you for an interview on their channels.

It sounds too good to be true? That's because it is (anyone who takes the above paragraph seriously in making their career decisions is solely responsible for the disappointment after their MS)

Completing a master's degree in Germany will be similar to completing education in any other country.

Professionally:

You will get a job in your trade. It could take you some time and you might have a hard time finding the job. Depending on the job market at the time, you may need to commit to salary or designation or both. You will be asked to work like everyone else and get results. You will have annual appraisals, which will decide your annual salary increases. When you start working, you will have 6 months of probation. If you do not meet expectations or do not meet expectations, you will be asked to leave the company.

Personally:

On a personal level, you will have a comfortable and calm life (once you have a job). You will save some of your monthly salary, hang out with friends, travel the EU and Europe without a visa. On longer vacations, you can visit your family in India. Depending on your salary, you will be eligible for a blue card, which will take you to your German RP. This is the time when you will be free from visa requirements to work in Germany. Getting a German PR will not make any real changes in your daily life realistically.

Family:

If you are not married, you will settle. Form a family and have a good group of international friends around you. Since you are away from your family in India, some of these friends will become your family in Germany.

Complain:

Quite often you will talk about technology, slow government processes, taxes, health insurance, and language. Depending on your career ambitions, you may find opportunities in the wider EU or the US / Canada.

German passport:

After staying in Germany for 8 years, you will be eligible for a German passport. If you do (not required), you will have one of the strongest passports in the world right now. You will save tons of money on Visa applications and documents. You will be able to live and work in most companies in the world. Your kids will get one too, giving them the flexibility to be part of a global, mobile workforce.

In general, life in Germany after MS will be quite similar to taking a master's degree in India and establishing a career there.

NOTE: The above is based on the assumption that you want to look for work after your MS in Germany. If you are more of a risk taker, have the business error, and continue to start a business, some of the above points will not apply to you.

Some of my other posts, you may like:

  • My personal trip to Germany PR:
Arun Mahajan · Updated July 31st How do I get permanent residence in Germany? As a foreigner in Germany, obtaining a PR means freedom and the constant stress of visa dependency. In my case, I came to Germany in January 2014 on a dependent visa. In fact, this helped me cover the trip from… .. Dependent Visa (2014) —-> to Work Visa (2014) - → to Blue Card (2015) —-> to Germany PR (20… (more)
  • Roadmap for students coming to Germany to German public relations:
Arun Mahajan · Updated July 31 I have just arrived in Germany as a student and hope to stay here permanently after my course. What steps can I take to secure permanent residence? Congratulations on the first step in the process: Landing in Germany. It's good that you have a clear long-term goal: German PR. To achieve this goal, you need to break it down into smarter short-term goals: 1. Take Your Course - Make sure you are very focused on the course / domain you are in. What else)
  • How difficult is it to find a job in Germany after MS here?
Arun Mahajan · Updated July 31st Is it true that foreign students pursuing a master's degree in Germany do not get a job after finishing their studies? Let me share with you two stories of foreign students pursuing a master's degree in Germany: 1 Avinash (TU Berlin) Avinash completed his master's degree from TU Berlin in Production Engineering. During his course, his internship was at one of the largest consumer goods companies in the world, based in West Germany. After the completion of hi… (more)

If you want to talk about something about your career, connect with me at ——> LinkedIn

I share more posts related to the CDG career

Of course, it is worth living in Germany if you have finished some kind of education from there. Life is really relaxed if you are a professional who works there. Let me tell you all the reasons that make Germany an attractive place to work:

Salary range: To be honest, I wouldn't say that you get the highest salaries in Germany. Compared to Luxembourg, Switzerland (the expenses are also quite high), Ireland (less expensive compared to Switzerland) or the USA, the average salary is considerably lower than what you would get in the USA or other countries developed as a qualified professional. But then i

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Of course, it is worth living in Germany if you have finished some kind of education from there. Life is really relaxed if you are a professional who works there. Let me tell you all the reasons that make Germany an attractive place to work:

Salary range: To be honest, I wouldn't say that you get the highest salaries in Germany. Compared to Luxembourg, Switzerland (the expenses are also quite high), Ireland (less expensive compared to Switzerland) or the USA, the average salary is considerably lower than what you would get in the USA or other countries developed as a qualified professional. But then, if you consider the cost of living and other factors, German companies offer quite attractive packages.

Degree - Get a degree in Germany and it pays to work there. German companies know that if you have studied in Germany, you definitely have an advantage, as you must have had practical work experience during your internship time (which is part of your curriculum). Compared to an applicant applying for the same job as you, you will be given much more preference.

Quality of work: Germany has by far a more pragmatic / less stressful or emotion-based relationship to working specifically in the information technology industry. People tend to take things more pragmatically and accept the situation trying to find solutions to achieve the result they hope for. So overall, without further context, Germany tends to offer the best options both in terms of quality of IT jobs and availability.

Job security - this is a very important factor in taking up employment in Germany. Germany offers very high job security and you just don't work in fear of being fired. If you complete your probationary period, the company cannot fire you without compelling reasons. Also, even if you are fired, the government provides unemployment benefits.

Opportunities: With a growing economy and an aging population, there are many job opportunities available in Germany.

Work permit: It is relatively easy to obtain a work permit in Germany. Furthermore, if you have worked in Germany for 24 to 36 months and have a good level of German, you can apply for permanent residence.

Work-life balance: Germany has a great work-life balance. Germans believe in hard work and the hardest game. It's not uncommon for many companies to end the workday at 3 p.m. on Friday or go out for a beer after work once a week with colleagues.

Sick Leave: An employee is entitled to six weeks pay in case of sick leave. After 6 weeks, the 'Krankengeld' (health insurance fund) pays benefits and sickness benefits at 65% of normal salary.

Family benefits: New mothers and fathers can divide the paid leave between them for a period of 14 months. And on top of that, the state will pay you money to take care of your children, until they turn 18.

I hope this helps

Sorry. This is completely untrue.
After graduating, you have 18 months to find a job. I did my masters and now I am finishing my PhD here and I am worried about staying. You can look for work but you have to show 670 euros in the bank per month, that is, about 8,000 euros. For anyone, that's a huge amount.
After you get a job, the immigration department must agree that it fits your qualifications. That depends on the individual officer. According to official statistics, two out of three students return even if they want to stay. You can find research and relevant articles on the net. If you

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Sorry. This is completely untrue.
After graduating, you have 18 months to find a job. I did my masters and now I am finishing my PhD here and I am worried about staying. You can look for work but you have to show 670 euros in the bank per month, that is, about 8,000 euros. For anyone, that's a huge amount.
After you get a job, the immigration department must agree that it fits your qualifications. That depends on the individual officer. According to official statistics, two out of three students return even if they want to stay. You can find research and relevant articles on the net. If you want the blue card, your annual salary must be around 50,000 and it is almost impossible to get that kind of job.
Don't make the mistake of coming to Germany if you want to stay. Come only if you want to return to your country of origin.

European countries and Germany offer affordable education with excellent accommodation options. German companies have job offers and require skilled workers, language is key for international students.

Germany follows a different classification for its universities: universities have good accreditations, with incredible connections to industry

Why Germany: affordable education

18 months Stay behind - to look for work

Courses offered in Germany in English and / or German.

  1. Basic Technician
  2. Combined technician and management (for example, engineering management)
  3. Pure management courses

Important points-

1. Good grades

2. IELTS sco

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European countries and Germany offer affordable education with excellent accommodation options. German companies have job offers and require skilled workers, language is key for international students.

Germany follows a different classification for its universities: universities have good accreditations, with incredible connections to industry

Why Germany: affordable education

18 months Stay behind - to look for work

Courses offered in Germany in English and / or German.

  1. Basic Technician
  2. Combined technician and management (for example, engineering management)
  3. Pure management courses

Important points-

1. Good grades

2. IELTS score

3.German language skills (start learning, help with jobs)

4. REQUEST ON TIME

You should have all documents ready to apply as soon as possible

For more details, feel free to call us for a counseling session - EduOptions Germany

EduOptions abroad

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It is not much different from any other phoren country. But I would still say that if you want to celebrate all the festivals in India, you want to see enough Indianon roads, then the US, UK, Australia and Singapore is a much better place.
Learning German is more complicated.

The positive part is that you can travel to many European countries and it is very, very beautiful. The United States does not come close to that.
I don't know how to put it, but in Germany all Indians are middle class. And that's how they live it and like it.

PLEASE SEE THE UPDATE FOR 2020 AT THE END OF THIS POST.

Without having any statistics at hand, I think this is more true than false.

Of course, you are not given a job just because you have a master's degree, neither in Germany nor anywhere else that I know of, so I suppose you are asking if foreigners have a good chance of finding employment in Germany in their fields after completing his master's degree at a German university. You may be inclined to think so. With its booming economy, population dwindling and a shortage of skilled workers in all technical fields, Germany would appear to be doing just fine.

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PLEASE SEE THE UPDATE FOR 2020 AT THE END OF THIS POST.

Without having any statistics at hand, I think this is more true than false.

Of course, you are not given a job just because you have a master's degree, neither in Germany nor anywhere else that I know of, so I suppose you are asking if foreigners have a good chance of finding employment in Germany in their fields after completing his master's degree at a German university. You may be inclined to think so. With its booming economy, declining population, and shortage of skilled workers in all technical fields, Germany would seem well served to welcome any foreigner with enough intelligence and motivation to pass one of its demanding master of science programs.

This is not the case. Germany does not welcome foreigners from outside the EU who do not have a family link to a German citizen, regardless of what they know or can do. Thus, in Germany, the main problem for non-EU citizens is not so much finishing the master's degree as obtaining a visa that allows them to work legally. That said, however, once you get such a visa, it is difficult for the German state to revoke it. And if you are ever unemployed, you will be entitled to a monthly subsistence allowance, so you never actually have to work. This explains much of the blatant lack of hospitality you will find at the immigration office, which they call the "Office of Aliens."

Non-EU foreigners can get a visa only if they solve a very nice catch-22 set out in German law: without a visa, they won't hire you. But without a job, you cannot get a visa. Students can stay 18 months after completing their degree to try to square the circle. If you can convince a German company to make you a contingent job offer, you can go to your local "Foreign Office" to ask for a visa. It is a begging, as you have no legal rights at this time. The individual officer assigned to you then has absolute discretion and must decide whether granting you a visa is normatively appropriate. The normative criteria established by law are two: 1) the officer who decides your case must ensure that there is no native German, currently unemployed, who could do the job and 2) getting the job must somehow improve Germany's international competitiveness (i.e. it must somehow be serving the Germans as a whole). As these criteria are confusing and difficult for the officer (who will most likely not have a master's degree) to apply, the officer will likely rely on instinct, which is susceptible to God knows what bad experiences he has had with foreigners who try. to play with the system. So if you don't have a pretty, honest face, hire a lawyer. A better solution is to convince a corporation of global players with good ties to the local Immigration Office to make you a job offer;

There is a kind of royal road to a work permit: "highly qualified" people can get a visa without work. The only problem is that if you don't have a job, the officer reviewing the application is not likely to consider you highly qualified, because why in the world would a highly qualified person be unemployed? Before trying this track, become a white medic first.

An elegant solution is to marry or have a child with a German citizen. This will get you your visa in no time. It will also greatly improve your German language skills, especially if you have children together. And if you're lucky, you and your partner will be so in love that work issues will no longer matter.

One last comment: there are no general rules for this. Visa decisions are made locally and on a case-by-case basis by outlandish folks trying to comply with shady laws. Some cities are liberal, others more stingy with their visas. I suppose that with those 18 months and a university degree in a highly prized technical field, most young people anywhere have a chance to fight to get a job in Germany if their potential employer provides them with legal and administrative support.


UPGRADE

On June 7, 2019, the German Bundestag passed a package of seven laws that will make it slightly easier for non-EU foreigners with a degree from a German higher education institution to search for and accept a job. It goes into effect on January 1, 2020.

The most relevant law of the package is the Fachkräfteeinwanderungsgesetz. Its purpose is to make it easier for non-EU foreigners with a university degree or specialized training to enter the country to look for work and stay here if they are employed. The motivation of German lawmakers in passing the law was to alleviate the current skilled labor shortage and thus mitigate its consequences for the German economy, not to permanently welcome foreigners into society. However, thanks to the Social Democrats, it opens the door a little more to work-motivated immigration, for two years starting on January 1, 2020 at least.

Generally speaking, the new law makes it easier for “Fachkräfte” to come to Germany to look for work and to stay in Germany if they are employed. A "Fachkraft" (plural "Fachkräfte") is a person with an officially recognized professional qualification. Having a degree from a German institution of higher education makes you a Fachkraft.

The new law brings the following improvements in the chances for foreign students to find and accept a job in Germany after graduating from a German educational institution.

1. During a trial period of a maximum of 5 years, a non-EU Fachkräfte can receive a six-month Aufenthaltserlaubnis (temporary residence permit) in order to search for work. Therefore, those who finished a master's program but then had to leave Germany can now return to try to find a job.

2. Fachkräfte who obtain an employment contract will receive a better visa, known as Aufenthaltstitel zur Ausübung einer Beschäftigung (residence permit for the search for gainful employment) for the duration of their employment. At this point, the employee begins to pay for the legal pension plan and this serves to slightly reduce the stigma that German law imposes on foreigners. German law and most Germans assume that foreigners staying for more than a few weeks are parasites on social welfare, but if it demonstrates a positive net personal contribution to welfare coffers, it has a disarming effect on the majority. of the Germans, as long as their skin is not. too dark.

3. The first major change brought by the law is that the opportunity to stay in Germany used to apply only to people qualified to work in professions specifically recognized as victims of labor shortages. Now applies to ALL specialty professions (that is, those for which you need a degree). Incidentally, the Fachkräfte can only work in the field for which they are formally qualified, but they can obtain a temporary residence permit in order to qualify in another field.

4. A second important change is that employers are no longer required to demonstrate the absence of qualified German resident candidates for jobs they offer to non-residents. However, this so-called Vorrangsprüfung can be reintroduced at any time in the future and will be reintroduced when the German economy no longer needs foreign labor or if the Germans decide to try a right-wing nationalist government again.

5. If you can maintain gainful employment and pay in the legal pension plan for 48 months, you have the opportunity to advance to the next level of status by obtaining a Niederlassungserlaubnis (permanent residence permit), at which point you are practically "in". This still does not give you an automatic right to bring your family to Germany to live with you, but at least you cannot lose this status easily. The easiest way to do that is to join a terrorist organization, but this would involve a significant career change anyway.

6. The third important change is that it is assumed that decisions regarding employment-motivated immigration will in the future be made by a centralized office, and not the local “Foreigners Offices” administered by the municipalities. But the German federal states may not like this idea, so its implementation may be delayed or limited.

In short, these new rules could result in big changes to the situation I described in 2014 in the previous article, where the highly skilled but highly stigmatized foreigner seeking employment has to interact with a skeptical and sometimes hapless bureaucrat at the local Immigration Office. . It should make these interactions faster and friendlier for the applicant because there are fewer decision points for the bureaucrat to exercise his discretion (see points 3 and 4 above) and there is an explicit invitation to stay six months in Germany to look for work ( Point 1). And if the idea of ​​a “centralized” Foreign Office is really implemented, it should make many interactions less personal. But the basic situation has not changed:

Certainly, the moment you apply for the permanent Niederlassungserlaubnis at the latest, it will be examined very closely in the way I originally described. There is a wonderful passage in Fachkräfteeinwanderungsgesetz that gives the bureaucrat of the Foreign Office a very wide discretion: paragraph 18c says that the local official can grant you the permanent residence visa if you can show that you have integrated into the “style conditions of German life ”(Gewährleistung der Integration in die Lebensverhältnisse der Bundesrepublik Deutschland). There is no definition of "lifestyle conditions" so obviously there is a lot of leeway for interpretation here, and it is the guy at the local Immigration Office who should decide how to apply it to you. So study the German way of life and imitate it to the best of your ability before opting for permanent residence. Fortunately, the German way of life is not so bad: 5 weeks of guaranteed vacation, many national holidays, 6 weeks of paid sick leave if you need it, guaranteed paid maternity and paternity leave, conditions of pretty good housing, universal health coverage, a widespread penchant for natural foods and high-quality alcohol, and finally (this is difficult but important to emulate) a general sense of guilt of superiority over all other countries. If you can adapt to that and adopt it, Willkommen! fairly good housing conditions, universal health coverage, a general penchant for natural foods and high-quality alcohol; and finally (this is difficult but important to emulate) a guilt of general superiority over all other countries. If you can adapt to that and adopt it, Willkommen! Fairly good housing conditions, universal health coverage, a general penchant for natural foods and high-quality alcohol, and finally (this is difficult but important to emulate) a general sense of guilt of superiority over all other countries. If you can adapt to that and adopt it, Willkommen! Fairly good housing conditions, universal health coverage, a general penchant for natural foods and high-quality alcohol, and finally (this is difficult but important to emulate) a general sense of guilt of superiority over all other countries. If you can adapt to that and adopt it, Willkommen! Fairly good housing conditions, universal health coverage, a general penchant for natural foods and high-quality alcohol, and finally (this is difficult but important to emulate) a general sense of guilt of superiority over all other countries. If you can adapt to that and adopt it, Willkommen!

Hey. I am an Indian with more than 2 years of work experience in Germany and therefore I can respond to the work scenario in Germany for foreign job seekers.

Like the very popular views in the other answers, there are indeed a plethora of job opportunities available here for those who are skilled enough.

When I came to Germany for the purpose of pursuing MS, I was told that the prospects of getting a job weren't great, but I was determined to find my way through the search for MS in Germany, which I did :)

In my story, the consulting I sought help from played a crucial role in my success.

Keep reading

Hey. I am an Indian with more than 2 years of work experience in Germany and therefore I can respond to the work scenario in Germany for foreign job seekers.

Like the very popular views in the other answers, there are indeed a plethora of job opportunities available here for those who are skilled enough.

When I came to Germany for the purpose of pursuing MS, I was told that the prospects of getting a job weren't great, but I was determined to find my way through the search for MS in Germany, which I did :)

In my story, the consulting firm I sought help from played a crucial role in my success. The people at the consultancy were well informed about the situation in Germany and started giving me German lessons. After a few months of learning German, I took the language proficiency tests and managed to pass level B2.

Learning German helps you in many ways. You can easily find part-time job opportunities if you speak German well. This helps you earn a few pounds to manage your living expenses, as education is free in Germany after all.

Getting a job doesn't matter just because you studied at a German university. You need to be smart enough to apply for internships during your course, which will add weight to your CV and thus take you out of the tens or hundreds of job seekers. In addition, you must hone your skills in the German language. On top of that, make connections as you progress through your MS in Germany so that you can use them while you find a job. Believe me, it is necessary.

Get to the point, finding a job as an international job seeker isn't very difficult if you play your cards right. Or you can also trust agencies or consultancies that are interested in guiding students about study programs. In my case, I trusted one of those consultants called Moksh Oversees and they definitely helped me in many ways during my MS in Germany.

I hope that my answer has been able to clarify your doubts.

I will tell you the things I know and what I have experienced:

# 1. Cost of education

When it comes to higher education, the first thing that comes to mind is cost. Especially it is very critical when you come from a middle class Indian family and you are going to have all the responsibilities, both financial and emotional.

If you compare the cost of studying for MS abroad, you will find that Germany stands out for the quality and inexpensive option. Most public universities literally have no tuition fees, so anyone (international or native) can follow their

Keep reading

I will tell you the things I know and what I have experienced:

# 1. Cost of education

When it comes to higher education, the first thing that comes to mind is cost. Especially it is very critical when you come from a middle class Indian family and you are going to have all the responsibilities, both financial and emotional.

If you compare the cost of studying for MS abroad, you will find that Germany stands out with the quality and the economical option. Most of the public universities have literally no tuition fees, so that anyone(being International or Native) can pursue their studies in the field they want and contribute in advancement of the society.

Studying in German universities is so cheap(but in a great way) that a student don’t need to worry about taking loans and living with the constant fear of debts with financial crisis.

However, from 2017, the state of Baden-Württemberg is introducing fees of €1500 for non-EU students.

#2. Quality of Education

It is true that there are no official rankings of German universities like American or Canadian universities. It doesn’t mean that the quality of education is less compared to those universities that are standing higher in QS or ant XYZ ranking system.

In Germany, every university is unique. Each university receives a specific projects from the industries and they work on that. For example, the university where I am currently enrolled has a CARISSMA Center of Automotive Research on Integrated Safety Systems and Measurement Area. They work on Automotive safety closely with Audi.

Also, I found that the intellectual level of the professors is infinitely better than what I dealt with my Bachelor’s. So nothing can be complained about the quality of the education.

#3. Student’s Discounts

This is what seems new if you come from India, where everyone just try to loot you in the name of education.

It’s completely reverse in Germany. If you are a student, you have a lots of advantages which includes cost of gesundheit versicherung(Health insurance), Bus/train pass, gym fees, lunch in cafeteria, cost of attending conference/exhibition etc.

In my university, they provide free laptop until your course completes, whichever you want.

#4. Safe and peaceful environment

This is something that I love about Germany. The country is completely safe. There are no riots, no political conflicts which cause problems for an International student.

The place where I live is so peaceful that you can not hear unnecessary voice throughout the day, and after 8 pm the streets are like there’s no human living in this area, which is strange to me because the city where I come from stays up all night.

FYI: There is a rule in Germany that if you disturb your neighbor after 10 pm, they can sue you.

#5. Travel anywhere in Europe(except England)

This is the most amazing part of the student visa of Germany. You can visit 27 different countries(Including Germany) on your student visa during your time at Germany. This is pretty cool.

Just last week we traveled to Austria and some places of Germany-Austria border. I can tell you that of you make a good plan, you can travel to every country which comes under European Union.

There are airlines by which you can travel to Italy or Prague only for €10(~700 Rs). Which other visa would offer you like that?

Imagine the cost of travel if you want to visit any of the European countries from India!

So, while studying in Germany, travelling in some of the best parts of the world is an additional benefit.

Thanks

Akshay.

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