What is better in terms of career: business or psychology?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Dario Lyons



What is better in terms of career: business or psychology?

That is a question that requires you to ask yourself a few questions.

Also, keep in mind that you will be using psychology while studying marketing, and it will be helpful to know some business concepts if you study psychology. So you'll use both skills either way, but as for which one to study ...

This is how you would choose between marketing or psychology.

Take a pen and paper and write this down.

Seriously, don't just do it in your head.

  1. What do you like about marketing?

    You mentioned market research and brainstorming. That's a good start, is there anything else?
  2. What don't you like about marketing?
  3. Wh
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That is a question that requires you to ask yourself a few questions.

Also, keep in mind that you will be using psychology while studying marketing, and it will be helpful to know some business concepts if you study psychology. So you'll use both skills either way, but as for which one to study ...

This is how you would choose between marketing or psychology.

Take a pen and paper and write this down.

Seriously, don't just do it in your head.

  1. What do you like about marketing?

    You mentioned market research and brainstorming. That's a good start, is there anything else?
  2. What don't you like about marketing?
  3. What do you like about psychology?

    Psychology is a very broad subject and I would recommend focusing on something rather than graduating with a general degree. If you plan to focus on something, you may need to do a master's degree to get the necessary qualifications. Realistically, there aren't too many options for those graduating with a degree in general psychiatry.

    But don't let that stop you, psychology can open the doors to many interesting and rewarding careers if you are really interested in it.
  4. What don't you like about psychology?
  5. What kind of environment do you want to work in?

    Where do you see yourself working? Is it a laboratory or an office? Do you see yourself working with people or products?

Read about each profession and learn all you can. Forget about the race titles for now and know the kinds of things that you will do day by day in each race.

Really understand what each profession does, where it is headed, and what opportunities it presents.

Use these keywords, for example:

  • day-to-day marketing, day-to-day psychology
  • career path in marketing, career path in psychology
  • marketing industry opportunities, psychology industry opportunities

The most important thing to remember is that a degree title does not define you.

Yes, you choose one thing to study, but the most important lesson you learn from college is learning how to learn and that the world is much bigger than you think.

Post-secondary education is designed to open your mind to what exists in this world and it is your job as a student to follow your interests. Don't be afraid if someone has different interests than yours, look for people who are doing interesting things.

Successful entrepreneurs are challenged by the conditions of marketing, the people they deal with as employees and consumers, and adjust their methods to suit those needs. They are subject to tax authority, auditing practices, and a million government regulations that challenge the most talented entrepreneur. They must have a product that people want to have and can afford to buy.

Psychologists treat people differently, creating their own challenges, frustrations, and detours and alleys that suggest the workings of the human mind. Those who w

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Successful entrepreneurs are challenged by the conditions of marketing, the people they deal with as employees and consumers, and adjust their methods to suit those needs. They are subject to tax authority, auditing practices, and a million government regulations that challenge the most talented entrepreneur. They must have a product that people want to have and can afford to buy.

Psychologists treat people differently, creating their own challenges, frustrations, and detours and alleys that suggest the workings of the human mind. Those who work in the trenches where the action is are constantly under pressure to act from insurance companies, hospital and consumer agencies, and licensing boards. The scrutiny comes from all sides, including employers, the press, accrediting agencies, and patients and their families, of course, who want to know why, how, and when.

Each of these professions is challenging and requires a certain type of individual who can be successful. Each requires tenacity, tenacity, the ability to see through and in the long run and stick with it.

I started my career as a marketer, but changed my plans a couple of times and finally settled on psychology. I liked to see people as complex puzzles that sometimes got scattered and needed help putting them back together.

Soon in my new studies, I began to realize that the new journey I had set for myself was a study of self-exploration that became a goal of self-actualization. Many of my colleagues would agree with this self-assessment, as it applies to themselves. While business is rewarding and challenging, psychology remains a relatively new science and there are new avenues for young students to explore and pave the way for others seeking to unravel the workings of the human mind. I hope you find your way.

Thank you for the request.

Half of four-year college graduates are unemployed or underemployed. It is very important to have a marketable specialization.

Psychology is one of those specialties where you will probably need a master's degree to get a good job in the field. Can you come up with a financial plan for 6 to 7 years of postsecondary education that makes sense?

I don't have a lot of data on marketing. I have interviewed two young ladies who specialize in marketing, coincidentally at the same school. They were both good students. Neither of us could get a good job.

Joan was receiving many interviews. He just couldn't get a good job.

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Half of four-year college graduates are unemployed or underemployed. It is very important to have a marketable specialization.

Psychology is one of those specialties where you will probably need a master's degree to get a good job in the field. Can you come up with a financial plan for 6 to 7 years of postsecondary education that makes sense?

I don't have a lot of data on marketing. I have interviewed two young ladies who specialize in marketing, coincidentally at the same school. They were both good students. Neither of us could get a good job.

Joan was receiving many interviews. He just couldn't get a good job. He had two interviews in Chicago. I was sure I had "nailed" one of them. No, rejected. He felt he had a good relationship with the HR person. She called her out. The feedback he received was that they could find many MBA candidates. Joan "bit the bullet" and went back to school for an MBA. Now he has a good job, but he also has $ 50,000 in student loans. She lives at home.

Christine graduated with very little debt because she had a lot of money for scholarships. He lives at home and has two minimum wage jobs. She is really "depressed". As she says, "I did everything they told me to do." She hadn't figured out what to do next. I suggested that she go to a community college and add a business certification to "get a foot in the door." That flipped like a "lead balloon."

I have a suspicion. Two of the clues that I have found in my research are that you need:

  • Create a resume that includes experiential learning, for example things like internships.
  • Consult the school's Professional Services when visiting schools. Universities vary widely in this regard. (As an example, the honors business program at Texas A&M has its own professional services with a 98% success rate.)

If I go back to that school, I will follow up on this. It can be the stumbling block.

It seems like you're caught between a serious interest and a socially acceptable career path. Business has the potential to be more lucrative, especially if you have an entrepreneurial spirit, while income levels from psychology will be capped based on health care reimbursement rates. So if it's money that motivates you, business would be the way to go. However, reading between the lines of their additional comments, it appears that money is not their motivator. It gives me the impression that ...

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I have an MBA and a BA in psychology. I used my psychology degree to go to law school. That's me.

It sounds like you are interested in people and how they make their decisions. Influences, results, processes, etc. Both fields will teach you. Both degrees require post-secondary training. With psychology you can go to graduate school right away. With business degrees, you generally need 2-3 years of experience before going to a good MBA program (don't bother with a mediocre one). There are also other fields in decision support and decision science research. Don't limit your options too quickly. College is a good place

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I have an MBA and a BA in psychology. I used my psychology degree to go to law school. That's me.

It sounds like you are interested in people and how they make their decisions. Influences, results, processes, etc. Both fields will teach you. Both degrees require post-secondary training. With psychology you can go to graduate school right away. With business degrees, you generally need 2-3 years of experience before going to a good MBA program (don't bother with a mediocre one). There are also other fields in decision support and decision science research. Don't limit your options too quickly. College is a good place to find out about yourself. Graduate is a place to study a field. You will not advance by jumping forward, you have to follow all the steps. Good luck

If you're unsure, maybe you should focus on finding out what it is that you really feel will be successful at and adding value to this world. Do that before you spend someone's money, buddy (I'm very frugal for whatever reason by the way). Even with the intention of studying, look at the branches of psychology that you tend to read the most and that are most fascinating to you. If you find yourself researching things in that field and feeling satisfied with a correct salary, go for it. Studying a marketing degree should, in theory, be beneficial to many of your activities in this life, although it might.

I think there is only one better advice anyone can give you:

Make up your mind and follow what you really want to do.

It may sound corny to you, but it's the truth. There is no point going down a path that you don't really want just because "I can get a job." Trust me, you will have a horrible life doing something that you really don't care about.

You can always go back to what Walt Disney said:

Of course, knowing what your dreams really are is not easy, and most people take a long time to discover them. Don't commit to anything you have doubts about.

Well, generally you should specialize in what you enjoy studying. However, do not specialize in psychology if you think you will be able to get a job that is closely related to your specialty. Almost all counseling jobs and other psychology-related jobs require advanced training. Think of a career in psychology as a career in history or sociology - it qualifies you for almost no jobs but it doesn't disqualify you for any. It's a liberal arts major, and as such you can land any number of jobs in any number of fields, but don't expect future employers to hire you because of a specific major. When the

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Well, generally you should specialize in what you enjoy studying. However, do not specialize in psychology if you think you will be able to get a job that is closely related to your specialty. Almost all counseling jobs and other psychology-related jobs require advanced training. Think of a career in psychology as a career in history or sociology - it qualifies you for almost no jobs but it doesn't disqualify you for any. It's a liberal arts major, and as such you can land any number of jobs in any number of fields, but don't expect future employers to hire you because of a specific major. The last time I taught, our psychology students got all kinds of good jobs (in finance, sales, public relations, public service, public relations, etc.) on the same types of jobs that specialize in other non-science and non-engineering jobs. older they got. Most ended up after a year or two going to graduate school, some in psychology, but many in medicine, law, or business. I repeat: don't think of a career in psychology as a way to get a job in psychology.

Don't think of a psychology major as something that helps you win friends and influence people, or makes you a better person in some way. Very few of their courses will offer instruction in those kinds of goals. If that's what you want, your grandparents or a seemingly wise older relative can probably help you. Or in a pinch, visit the self-help section of your local bookstore, assuming they still exist.

Psychology deals with the science of human behavior and especially thought. If you are fascinated by why we think the way we do, remember strange things and forget things that are important, you may or may not learn a foreign language and have the ability to think more creatively than the family dog, and if you find the science behind trying to understand that and more fascinating, then psychology is a good specialization. Some people like to study the physical or biological world and others the mental. My experience as a psychology teacher was that those students who decided to specialize in psychology to try to understand their own complexes and misdeeds, ended up specializing in something else, bored that their instructors were constantly dealing with the experiments and the science behind what they were doing. we are studying. Our best majors were typically those who started out as physics or engineering students, those who found science and scientific approaches fascinating and thought that the human mind was as complicated as the atomic structure. I started as a physics student.

It's a great specialization if you tackle it for the right reasons. What Happens After You Graduate? That will fix itself. Perhaps you are so fascinated that you want to get a Ph.D. in the field; Or maybe you want to go to law school or medical school after taking the few courses that medical schools require. Maybe you will find a job as a chef or software designer or artist or shoe salesman or politician. Psychology won't help you get a foot in the door on most of those jobs, but it won't hurt and in the meantime, you'll have to spend 4 years specializing in something you enjoy. College can be a great experience, but don't ruin it by majoring in something you're not passionate about because you approached it for the wrong reasons.

Good luck. Find something that you are passionate about and study it.

Look. If you are there to help people, take it. You'll deal with lazy classmates, annoying STEM majors, and lots of nasty teachers. And it probably won't prepare you for the field. Your client may commit suicide or may not be able to handle sessions with murderers and rapists. The aim of these courses is to give you a basic understanding (if you are working in the field, I cannot tell for researchers).

The reason you should take it is so that you understand the basics of the field. If you are not looking for a career in psychiatry or research, I do not suggest

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Look. If you are there to help people, take it. You'll deal with lazy classmates, annoying STEM majors, and lots of nasty teachers. And it probably won't prepare you for the field. Your client may commit suicide or may not be able to handle sessions with murderers and rapists. The aim of these courses is to give you a basic understanding (if you are working in the field, I cannot tell for researchers).

The reason you should take it is so that you understand the basics of the field. If you are not looking for a career in psychiatry or research, I do not suggest it. Psychology is a field that is learned primarily from real work rather than from a college education. I don't understand why you would take it if you are looking for medicine.

This field is serious. It is intended to provide basic information to people who want to help people with mental disorders or study the brain. And there are many mental disorders besides depression, bipolar disorder, bulimia, or psychopathy. Especially if you live in a big city. You will have to deal with authorized children and other people who have injured themselves more than 30 times. You need to be creative enough to make individual plans that help people overcome what they are facing (post-traumatic stress disorder, multiple personality disorder, bipolar personality disorder, etc.) while not triggering them in some way.

You can work with men who were sexually abused or refugees. You could even work on a military base and deal with men who have seen their friends die and innocent people shot in the head. You may work in a prison and have the near-impossible job of making a psychopath feel emotional (good luck with that). You can work with someone with anxiety disorders who cannot handle talking about certain topics that might be the only way to help you. And at the end of it all, you will realize that it is only through your own decision that you will allow yourself to be healed. You are just a weak voice to the thousands of them.

Also, if you are seriously considering the profession, but it is because of the easy aspect…. You must understand that it can be a major factor in possibly traumatizing a patient from returning to therapy. You could manipulate them or make a patient angry enough to attack you. You will have to hear horror stories from the human population and you might even start questioning those around you.

The major is not difficult. Conducting experiments is the closest you will get as a college student. If you are studying psychiatry, I suggest that you first make friends with people who have mental illnesses and try to help them. I suggest you know exactly what you are getting into. If you have depression or some other disorder, then you will understand what I am talking about. I suggest you go to the specialty to help people. Some people say that in this class you can learn to "read people." No, you will learn it simply by observing those around you.

Another thing. You will also need to educate people (especially parents) about the existence of mental illness. Some people refuse to think that their child has or has a problem. Good luck.

If you go to medical school, you won't learn anything from that class. Take a major in literature or philosophy, and you will likely gain a better understanding of the human mind than you will in various classes where you will never meet someone struggling with serious disorders. Or just read books. And not psychology books. Read philosophy. Philosophers are very introspective and don't bother trying to explain the mind through the brain. They will cut to the chase and tell you what they believe in and try to defend it.

I had that same mindset in college, and I'm sorry to say that meant I completely overlooked many more important details about my work life.

Having those jobs involves a lot more than just pay. At the top of my head, these important distinctions come to mind:

  1. Educational requirements. Depending on what you want to do with a degree in psychiatry, you are potentially looking for a lot more education. It's almost impossible to get a psychologist job without a Ph.D., and that means another 5-7 years (or 7-9 if you get your master's degree along the way) of education just to start working. I think you can be a
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I had that same mindset in college, and I'm sorry to say that meant I completely overlooked many more important details about my work life.

Having those jobs involves a lot more than just pay. At the top of my head, these important distinctions come to mind:

  1. Educational requirements. Depending on what you want to do with a degree in psychiatry, you are potentially looking for a lot more education. It's almost impossible to get a psychologist job without a Ph.D., and that means another 5-7 years (or 7-9 if you get your master's degree along the way) of education just to start working. I think you can be a CPA with a bachelor's degree.
  2. Demand. There are a ton of specialists in psychology, which makes getting into graduate school incredibly difficult. It also makes searching for internships highly competitive. I don't know much about accounting, but what is the demand for those jobs? How difficult will it be to find a job after finishing school?
  3. Emotional toll. Psych is an incredibly emotionally burdensome field. You need to be good at compartmentalizing your day, so that a difficult session or an annoying client doesn't ruin your week. I imagine you have less of that as an accountant, but you would also have a “peak season” (tax season!) Where things are very busy. Do you like that kind of stresd? Do you want to spend a lot of time away from your family each January?
  4. Workday. How much interaction does an accountant have with his co-workers on a day-to-day basis? You like people. Do you have the energy to deal with a full list of clients in the field of psychology or would you rather have a job that would keep it more for you?

These are just some of the things that come to mind. I'm not sure how long you've been in college, but I encourage you to take a few classes in both subjects to really assess your interest. That will also give you a chance to talk to your professors about the different jobs and work experience you could expect in any of the fields.

If you are wondering where I came from with this advice, I am currently working on an interview project where I talk to many different people about their work lives. I have not interviewed an accountant (yet! I hope to do so soon), but I did speak with a psychology technician (a lower level psychiatric position). If you want to read more about this kind of thing, check out my blog:

Interviews | About a job blog | Explore work

With a bachelor's degree in psychology, you won't be qualified to do much. The jobs available will be mainly janitorial in rehabilitation centers or hospitals, as an ordinance. The pay will be low. My neighbor's daughter was stuck in retail with her degree, then she worked as a CNA (nursing assistant) in a nursing home, changing diapers, etc. She is now in a program to become certified to work with autistic children using a specific treatment that they have found to be effective in older Alzheimer's patients as well. That is what you finally want to do. But it won't pay much either. There is no real counseling

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With a bachelor's degree in psychology, you won't be qualified to do much. The jobs available will be mainly janitorial in rehabilitation centers or hospitals, as an ordinance. The pay will be low. My neighbor's daughter was stuck in retail with her degree, then she worked as a CNA (nursing assistant) in a nursing home, changing diapers, etc. She is now in a program to become certified to work with autistic children using a specific treatment that they have found to be effective in older Alzheimer's patients as well. That is what you finally want to do. But it won't pay much either. There is no real counseling for clients without a graduate school and advanced degree.

A master's degree won't do you any better and few are offered. Most of the people who have them dropped out before completing their PhD. He had four friends in college who were accepted into doctoral programs. None finished. I think 2 years was the maximum for any of them, and a PhD. takes 6-10 years to complete. In psychology, you really need a Ph.D. But those programs focus primarily on the research that professionals do while teaching at universities. Since insurance companies refer clients primarily to master's level counselors, because they are cheaper, it is difficult to earn a living practicing as a clinical psychologist (Ph.D.). So if you want to coach people one on one, I highly recommend that you get your master's level in counseling, like an LPC or LCSW. LPC is preferred. You can also earn a master's level in School Counseling, which pays pretty well and has great benefits, including time off. Later, you can continue with your Ed.S. (Education Specialist), which is like a second teacher and increases your pay level. If you don't like working with young children, become a middle or high school counselor. Add in coaching a sport, and you have more employment opportunities and even more money. Schools are one of the few places that still offer a pension, and if you work in a system that pays Social Security, you will be eligible for that too. you can continue with your Ed.S. (Education Specialist), which is like a second teacher and increases your pay level. If you don't like working with young children, become a middle or high school counselor. Add in coaching a sport, and you have more employment opportunities and even more money. Schools are one of the few places that still offer a pension, and if you work in a system that pays Social Security, you will be eligible for that too. you can continue with your Ed.S. (Education Specialist), which is like a second teacher and increases your pay level. If you don't like working with young children, become a middle or high school counselor. Add in coaching a sport, and you have more employment opportunities and even more money. Schools are one of the few places that still offer a pension, and if you work in a system that pays Social Security, you will be eligible for that too.

I used my bachelor's degree in psychology to continue the graduate program in School Psychology which, in many states, requires the Ed.S. degree. to get certified to work in schools. It was a 3 year post graduate program. The job description varies from state or system to state, but primarily evaluated children to determine what was preventing them from succeeding academically and determined if they were eligible for special education services. It could be a medical, emotional, or learning disability. I specialized in learning disabilities, identifying their specific neurological processing problems and how to address them. I worked in a small rural school system, with children from 3 years old until high school graduation. I loved. Very often,

In a class called Applied Psychology, you will get an overview of the various types of psychology that are practiced; medical, athletic, clinical, organizational, etc., that require PhDs, but will not mention careers in counseling (LPC, LCSW), school careers like the ones I just mentioned, or rehabilitation counseling, which works with disabled adults. . There is a lot of prejudice towards those who do not seek a PhD. in psychology. Many of the rehabilitation counselors end up working for the Department of Labor helping people get job training or find work, But I do know some in private practice who work with people with spinal injuries and I advocate for them to obtain assistance and equipment from government agencies and insurance companies who are reluctant to spend money owed to the client. These people are doing very well financially.

I recommend that you do your research in the various areas, also speaking with professors in the undergraduate department of psychology, as well as with graduate professors in the specialty areas that interest you. Ask about what is required in terms of degrees, what the job is like, a general expectation of pay, and job opportunities. School psychology is a little-known field, so there is, and has been, a national shortage of qualified individuals. There are many jobs available anywhere you want to work. In the field of Clinical Psychology, however, it is 1) very difficult to get into a PhD program and 2) saturated with people who cannot get a job because insurance companies do not want to pay their high fees.

I am impressed that you are thinking ahead and trying to figure out the value of a title before moving on. Most people think that having a piece of parchment paper will allow them to get whatever job they want. That is so untrue! So, you are being very wise. But, earning a psychology degree without plans to graduate and major is just a huge waste of money and time. Also, a major in psychology is not what people assume; "Oh, it's a soft science and people just tell you about their problems." That is an erroneous assumption, but a typical one. Also, many young people take psychology thinking that they will solve their own problems. The courses are difficult, especially the statistics that are required for the specialty. Remember, the field of study is focused on research, so statistics are essential. What's more, psychological statistics are second only to actuarial statistics in terms of difficulty. My class started with 67 students. Some were on their third try. They fell like flies, and less than 40 of us won the final. Fewer still have happened. These people had to switch majors because "no success stats, no degree." I felt blessed to come out with a B, even though I graduated with a 3.85 GPA. and less than 40 of us won the final. Fewer still have happened. These people had to switch majors because "no success stats, no degree." I felt blessed to come out with a B, even though I graduated with a 3.85 GPA. and less than 40 of us won the final. Fewer still have happened. These people had to switch majors because "no success stats, no degree." I felt blessed to come out with a B, even though I graduated with a 3.85 GPA.

So keep asking questions and analyzing the field. I hope I have helped. Regardless of what you decide to specialize in, I suggest you look into it for job opportunities as well. The best of luck to you.

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