What is a typical response to "Why do you want to quit your current job?"

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Sterling Saunders



What is a typical response to "Why do you want to quit your current job?"

If you are actively looking for a new job, there are likely a variety of factors that led you to seek a new opportunity. It could be something as simple as wanting to move or have a better commute, or it could be something more complicated, like having a manager you don't get along with. Regardless of your situation, you are likely to be asked "why do you want to quit your current job" at least once during the course of your job search. While this may be a difficult question to understand, knowing how to answer it ahead of time can ultimately help you get the job.

Here are the do's

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If you are actively looking for a new job, there are likely a variety of factors that led you to seek a new opportunity. It could be something as simple as wanting to move or have a better commute, or it could be something more complicated, like having a manager you don't get along with. Regardless of your situation, you are likely to be asked "why do you want to quit your current job" at least once during the course of your job search. While this may be a difficult question to understand, knowing how to answer it ahead of time can ultimately help you get the job.

Here are the dos and don'ts to explain why you are leaving your current position:

DON'T: Forget to prepare for this question

Preparing for a job interview can be overwhelming, so it can be easy to forget to prepare for critical questions! However, the probability of being asked why you are leaving your current employer is high, so it is important that you prepare for this question as much as possible. When preparing your answer, make sure you have a concise and clear answer; Leaving your answer for interpretation can make a hiring manager worry about whether or not you are being honest with them.

DO: Talk about your long-term career goals.

When preparing for a question like 'why do you want to quit your current job', you don't want to focus on the factors that have forced you to seek a new position. Instead, a more effective strategy would be to highlight your long-term career goals and how the company can help you achieve them. Employers want to hire candidates who not only have the desire to grow, but also have the desire to move up within their organization. For example, if you quit your job because you were turned down for a promotion, too many times, this would be a more strategic way to start your response:

“I have been with my company for x years, and in that time I have learned a lot about insert field. At this point, I am looking to challenge myself more by taking on more responsibilities and having more supervision in a professional role. "

DON'T: throw your current or former employer under the bus

There can be a variety of factors why you want to leave your current job, and it is understandable that you want to leave a job that makes you unhappy and unproductive. However, regardless of what those negative reasons are, you don't want one of the first impressions you give a potential employer to be bad! Not only is it unprofessional to badmouth your company or manager, but doing so with a potential employer can cause you to worry, over time, that you will eventually do the same to them.

DO: discuss the value you can bring to the company

When interviewing for a new job opportunity, you never want to just talk about how the company can benefit you. Also, you want to talk about how your hiring would be mutually beneficial to you and the company. When asked 'why do you want to leave your current company', be sure to focus on how your strengths and abilities will help benefit the company in the future. Doing so shows an employer that you are aware of the company's goals and, if hired, you would be committed and able to help achieve them.

I imagine if I were a boss and were hiring someone, I'd like to hear something to suggest that your current boss wasn't responsible for your decision to leave. That means nothing to do with culture, work environment, pay (or lack thereof), amount of work, etc. - anything a boss has direct control over.

== Bad answers ==

This question is not an invitation to rant about how horrible your current / previous job is. Although the following statements are probably true, they should not be said. If so, at least tweak it to try and make it sound more pleasant. But don't mention the

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I imagine if I were a boss and were hiring someone, I'd like to hear something to suggest that your current boss wasn't responsible for your decision to leave. That means nothing to do with culture, work environment, pay (or lack thereof), amount of work, etc. - anything a boss has direct control over.

== Bad answers ==

This question is not an invitation to rant about how horrible your current / previous job is. Although the following statements are probably true, they should not be said. If so, at least tweak it to try and make it sound more pleasant. But don't mention these.

  • I hate my boss
  • They don't pay me well
  • People suck
  • It's boring
  • Nobody appreciates me
  • I do not do anything
  • His office is a cold and desolate wasteland

== Neutral Responses ==

These responses show that you didn't necessarily want to quit your last job / current job, but more than situations are forcing you. They're more like excuses than real reasons, like, oh, this happened and now I'm forced to quit.

  • I wanted to get closer to my spouse / children / family, etc.
  • The journey is too far
    • Only if this new place is significantly closer
  • Medical leave or some kind of sabbatical between the two jobs
  • Higher education, he entered the university of his dreams.
    • This applies more if you had a job, went back to school, and are now looking for a new job.

== Good answers ==

These show that you are actively seeking to improve yourself and want to go beyond where you are now. He wants to play on how “technologically advanced” and “innovative” this new company is and how excited he is for the opportunity to use cutting edge technology. I put them in quotes because all companies today are going to say that they are "innovative".

  • I am really interested in ______ where my current workplace is not working
    • Example: I am really interested in stock market analysis and artificial intelligence that my current workplace Piano Parts Inc. does not work on
  • Career change, I thought you should make sure you qualify
    • Example: I really want to be a technical recruiter and my previous positions have been dental assistants.
  • Work-life balance
    • Example: I worked a start-up 14 hours every day and odd hours, but I'm getting older and want to sit down and have a more stable schedule.

== Other tips ==

  • Don't badmouth your current employer, your new boss can easily imagine you're doing it for him should he hire you.
  • Don't spout how much it sucks in your current position
  • Stay positive, focus more on how great this new company is than how bad the last one was.
  • Be excited about new opportunities and opportunities to try things
  • Be professional, although you may feel like you are getting along with your interviewer, now is not the time to let go of that joke your office colleagues played on your boss.

Focus on the positive. You are not running away from your old job. You are running towards your new one.

Don't say: I am not learning enough at the company and I feel bored.
(Eek. So has the last year been kind of a waste? Your experience isn't as significant as it sounds? Plus, you sound like a negative person.)

You say: I love learning and I want to face new challenges. I am especially interested in understanding more about <inserting technology or challenge in the interviewer's company>.
(Great! I like people who like to learn. They tend to know a lot.

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Focus on the positive. You are not running away from your old job. You are running towards your new one.

Don't say: I am not learning enough at the company and I feel bored.
(Eek. So has the last year been kind of a waste? Your experience isn't as significant as it sounds? Plus, you sound like a negative person.)

You say: I love learning and I want to face new challenges. I am especially interested in understanding more about <inserting technology or challenge in the interviewer's company>.
(Great! I like people who like to learn. They tend to know a lot. They are enthusiastic about difficult problems. Oh, and you just showed some passion for my company's problems. Yes, I would like to hire someone like your. )

Many reasons for leaving a company can be rethought in a positive way. Those who can't be (eg "My boss is a sexist jerk") are probably best left unmentioned.

Well, why are you considering leaving your current company?

That is a good place to start.

It's not really a trick question, but the answer you give may have some pitfalls.

You don't want to look down on your employer, that is considered a no-no and has the effect of making your hopeful future employer wonder if they will ever look down on them.

You don't want to give an answer that suggests greed is driving your decision, but you can mention compensation if you're sure you're actually underpaid. (Skeptical recruiters might wonder if it's really worth the pittance they're paying

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Well, why are you considering leaving your current company?

That is a good place to start.

It's not really a trick question, but the answer you give may have some pitfalls.

You don't want to look down on your employer, that is considered a no-no and has the effect of making your hopeful future employer wonder if they will ever look down on them.

You don't want to give an answer that suggests greed is driving your decision, but you can mention compensation if you're sure you're actually underpaid. (However, skeptical recruiters might wonder if it's really worth the pittance they're paying you.)

You don't want to give an answer that suggests you have such high standards and values ​​that no company will be able to meet them.

And you don't want to give an answer that puts all the blame or responsibility on someone else. You must accept some responsibility for the situation you are in and the responsibility to get out of it.

That's a lot of "don'ts".

On the "doing" side of things, I always like to lean on the truth. And being as transparent as possible gives your future employer the opportunity to provide you with what you want and what you don't get from your current employer.

More independence? Let your future employer know, so they don't hire you if it's full of micromanagers. If you want too much independence, it may be unruly. So make sure you can define and restrict (ironically!) That need.

Do you want to work from home? That could be important to you, and if the prospective company doesn't offer that benefit, it would be nice to know up front. However, unless this is really central to your desire to leave your current employer, it's probably not something to drive with.

Do you want a more challenging job? Be careful what you ask for and make sure you live up to the demands. Be prepared to show that you are.

No room to move forward? Hmmmm. That might make them wonder if you're not worthy of a breakthrough. Just because you don't get promoted doesn't mean there is any injustice. You may not really be good enough to get promoted.

Do you want more money? Be prepared to show that you are underpaid and undervalued for the job market. Just because you feel underpaid doesn't mean you are. And you may have to give up something for more money - more stress, more time at work, less free time, more responsibility, etc.

Give reasons that show you know what they want, that you take responsibility for their career and growth, and give reasons that show your future employer that you are committed to them and their success.

Why do you want to leave? The grass always looks greener from your side of the fence, but be careful not to move for the wrong reasons… ..

Let's accept the fact. You throw yourself with questions constantly in an interview. If you are an experienced person, not only are your questions limited to your exposure to previous jobs, but they come down to asking what caused you to leave the job if you have had a well-prepared exposure listed. Don't panic as I have some of the safe answers below. You can collaborate at your convenience or where and how well you fit into that particular job role.

  • Try to learn something new:

You can show them that you have learned what you wanted in your previous job and that something more challenging awaits you now

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Let's accept the fact. You throw yourself with questions constantly in an interview. If you are an experienced person, not only are your questions limited to your exposure to previous jobs, but they come down to asking what caused you to leave the job if you have had a well-prepared exposure listed. Don't panic as I have some of the safe answers below. You can collaborate at your convenience or where and how well you fit into that particular job role.

  • Try to learn something new:

You can show them that you have learned what you wanted in your previous job and are now on more challenging and more role-oriented tasks. Show them that the desire to learn is huge and therefore you have quit your previous job.

  • New environment:

New Growth: No one in the workplace wants to see them, about to hire passive employees and confined to their respective roles. People are generally looking for energetic and volatile people for the environment. So, go ahead and accept the challenges and eventually you will experience the happiness of working in a new environment.

  • Specific salary increase:

To be honest, one of our reasons to wake up is that we are attracted to our packages. Lest it sound so obvious, maybe you can put this in a more subtle way to show that the company you are applying for not only found the position interesting, but also the package. Keep it honest but discreet.

  • Switch of interest:

You could express this by saying that your interest in the current room has changed. Because you have always been passionate about excelling in this particular field and when you have the opportunity to show your skills and pursue your passion, why not look for the same?

  • Career advance:

It is quite shocking to let them know that you are interested in furthering your career and that this in particular can contribute to your growth in the future and therefore you had to leave your previous job to rise and grow higher.

  • References:

Show them that this company is doing well and that you are looking forward to working with them and are one of their referral contacts to join here. The more enthusiastic you are, the greater the chances of your selection.

These are some of the safe answers it can offer. If you do well with them, I hope it helps you in what you are looking for.

They ask me like this multiple times, in addition to Covid's answer, I would typically give the reasons below.

The first is generally about looking for a new challenge.

I'd like to point out why my previous work will get super repetitive and creativity quickly ran out of the tank.

If I don't adjust, my career will remain constant under routine. So I go out.

The second reason is that it is due to internal change.

It could range from a stakeholder shift to a massive change that affects your benefit-to-work-life balance.

Tell them the truth and if they walked the same path, they would understand.

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They ask me like this multiple times, in addition to Covid's answer, I would typically give the reasons below.

The first is generally about looking for a new challenge.

I'd like to point out why my previous work will get super repetitive and creativity quickly ran out of the tank.

If I don't adjust, my career will remain constant under routine. So I go out.

The second reason is that it is due to internal change.

It could range from a stakeholder shift to a massive change that affects your benefit-to-work-life balance.

Tell them the truth and if they walked the same path, they would understand.

The third reason is that you need an employer who can match the value of your skill and how you've put that previous experience to a higher level.

Sometimes if you stay within the same company, the salary may not increase as much as the new employer can provide.

Explain what you learned during the last job and how you had surpassed all the achievements, show them why you are worth it.

The No-No answer is to speak ill of your previous employer if you may have a bad experience with them.

No matter how you went through it, the detail of this type of experience will never help and will even create a bad image in your employer's mind.

Whatever the past is, everything is gone and you should always conjure up a positive path for both of you to follow.

No employer like a candidate who misrepresented his former company. Always.

The above answers helped me a lot to succeed in the interview. Always get an answer from your integrity.

There are no best answers as it all depends on your work history and the real reasons you left. It also depends on what the potential employer offers that your current employer cannot.

Your position is easily defensible if you have been with the current company for more than 5 years. You can just say, I want to add variety in my career as the main reason. You don't just need to state a single reason, but add more like best salary, position, quality of work, brand name, etc., as reasons.

Many people customize their responses based on available positions. For example, if they are requesting a much higher amount

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There are no best answers as it all depends on your work history and the real reasons you left. It also depends on what the potential employer offers that your current employer cannot.

Your position is easily defensible if you have been with the current company for more than 5 years. You can just say, I want to add variety in my career as the main reason. You don't just need to state a single reason, but add more like best salary, position, quality of work, brand name, etc., as reasons.

Many people customize their responses based on available positions. For example, if they are applying for a much bigger brand, then they talk about how this has been their dream company and how they weren't looking for a change until this opportunity was noticed.

Sometimes location and personal reasons can also be cited, but remember that you don't end up shooting with your foot. For example, if you say that someone in the family is sick, then you want a better work-life balance to care for them. The employer may question your flexibility if a project requires additional work.

Lastly, if you've been changing jobs quickly, whatever you say, the employer will doubt you, and for higher positions, people with less stability are often turned down on CV review status.

A tempting question to answer !!

Well Saddam, there is no better answer to this question, this is one of the best questions instead !!

So let's move on with the possible answers to this question:

  1. When you want to change your field. Suppose you are working in an audit department and you no longer want to continue in auditing, because you have had a lot of that, you may think about changing your job and your responsibilities as well. Generally, people change fields when they want to gain knowledge about something new in their professional career and yes ... recruiters love to see that people are interested.
Keep reading

A tempting question to answer !!

Well Saddam, there is no better answer to this question, this is one of the best questions instead !!

So let's move on with the possible answers to this question:

  1. When you want to change your field. Suppose you are working in an audit department and you no longer want to continue in auditing, because you have had a lot of that, you may think about changing your job and your responsibilities as well. People usually change fields when they want to gain knowledge about something new in their professional career and yes ... recruiters love to see that people are interested in giving a shot in the profile, for what they are recruiting! They like to have new and energetic minds in their work profile.
  2. When you think about it, the company you are applying to has a good chance for you to grow, due to the increased goodwill and business expansion of the new company (which you are applying to). People will be attracted to a company that has good growth potential and would love to work for these companies, so that they themselves grow with the company!
  3. The other option would be a role change that you need. You can get a good role in the new company compared to the one you are working with!

Hope this CAN help you in some way!

I always hate this question because I have a reason to leave, but I don't think a potential employer really needs to know that. I choose to quit my job and get a new job for various reasons. Sometimes it is the management style, sometimes it is the lack of integrity on the part of the employer. I think it is important to have an answer to this question ready. The answer should not be critical of your current employer. It should be focused on your needs and goals for your career. So, I tend to say that “I am looking to improve my professional skills in the area from xxxx to

Keep reading

I always hate this question because I have a reason to leave, but I don't think a potential employer really needs to know that. I choose to quit my job and get a new job for various reasons. Sometimes it is the management style, sometimes it is the lack of integrity on the part of the employer. I think it is important to have an answer to this question ready. The answer should not be critical of your current employer. It should be focused on your needs and goals for your career. So, I tend to say that "I am looking to improve my professional skills in the xxxx area and I think I can achieve it as an employee of this company" or something like that.

I have used

  • location. The new company is less displaced or I have moved.
  • Skills improvement. The new company offers the opportunity to improve the skill set that I want to develop further.
  • Advance. The old company is smaller and has less prospects for advancement / promotion.
  • Challenge. I've been at work for a couple of years and it's no longer a challenge.

Be careful how you write the reason for advancement. You want to make sure they don't think you'll be pushing for a promotion 12 months later if they hire you.

In all cases, be sure to let them know (or at least make them think) that you are not desperate to get out of communication.

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I have used

  • location. The new company is less displaced or I have moved.
  • Skills improvement. The new company offers the opportunity to improve the skill set that I want to develop further.
  • Advance. The old company is smaller and has less prospects for advancement / promotion.
  • Challenge. I've been at work for a couple of years and it's no longer a challenge.

Be careful how you write the reason for advancement. You want to make sure they don't think you'll be pushing for a promotion 12 months later if they hire you.

In all cases, be sure to let them know (or at least make them think) that you are not desperate to get out of the company and that you are looking for something that is a good fit. Never make them think it's just the money, or you hate the current job and would take anything to quit.

My response to this incorporates the following idea: You have skills that are better suited to your new job than your current one, and you want to maximize your effectiveness. The following is an example.

"This change is not about leaving my previous job, but about moving to this new position at your company, which gives me the opportunity to contribute more as it better suits my skills.

For example, one of my strongest skills is ______, and I see it as very valuable here because ________.

I believe that people should be in a position to maximize the value and impact of their talents, and I believe that

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My response to this incorporates the following idea: You have skills that are better suited to your new job than your current one, and you want to maximize your effectiveness. The following is an example.

"This change is not about leaving my previous job, but about moving to this new position at your company, which gives me the opportunity to contribute more as it better suits my skills.

For example, one of my strongest skills is ______, and I see it as very valuable here because ________.

I believe that people should be in a position to maximize the value and impact of their talents, and I can do better here than in my current role. "

You, of course, will have to fill in the blanks.

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