What is a good onboarding process like?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Iker Burt



What is a good onboarding process like?

Joining a new company is a momentous "first".

And not unlike other big firsts we experience, the first day of school, the first date, the first time in a new city, is plagued with questions like "Do you like me?" "I like them?" "Will it always be like this?"

Recently, I was working with a client who was interested in transforming his company's onboarding process. The conventional wisdom here is to get new hires up to speed as quickly as possible, primarily by telling them all about the company. It is almost as if the company says to the employee: “It is your job to join us. you

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Joining a new company is a momentous "first".

And not unlike other big firsts we experience, the first day of school, the first date, the first time in a new city, is plagued with questions like "Do you like me?" "I like them?" "Will it always be like this?"

Recently, I was working with a client who was interested in transforming his company's onboarding process. The conventional wisdom here is to get new hires up to speed as quickly as possible, primarily by telling them all about the company. It is almost as if the company says to the employee: “It is your job to join us. Your needs, your preferences, your experience, keep all of that to yourself. Instead, just listen. "

This experience reminds me of many bad first dates. The other person talks all the time. They don't ask you any questions. They dominate the conversation. And in the end, you wonder why you bother dating.

And yet, this is how most corporate onboarding programs are designed.

Instead, a momentous, memorable, and motivating onboarding should be a two-way experience in which the company learns about you as much as you learn about the company. And like a great first date, it should be well planned, dynamic, personal, social, and meaningful.

Here are some practical ways to make your onboarding experience just that.

1. Design a two-way onboarding experience by establishing a foundation for inclusion and belonging.

The same questions a kindergarten child asks himself are the same questions a 40-year-old asks himself on his first day of work. "Where do I sit? Who am I going to have lunch with? Will I fit in? Am I going to make friends? Will they accept me? "

The way to alleviate this anxiety is by learning the preferences of this new employee as he begins to integrate them into the company. The way I explain this to companies is the difference between taking an employee-centric approach and a company-centric approach (which is, "I need to tell you all these things. I need to include them in our system").

That is the need of the company. But what is the human need? Their needs are to feel seen and understood, to feel valued, and to have an early sense of camaraderie. Time for managers to understand a new hire's job preferences, time for socializing, time for a new hire to teach the company something are all ways to design for those human needs.

2. make it multimedia and multimodal

Most onboarding programs are Zoom meetings plus PowerPoints.

  • "Here's the overview."
  • "Any questions?"
  • "We will send you a follow-up PDF."

However, if you are willing to invest a little, there are many more things you can do to make onboarding a new hire more memorable and, most importantly, educational. On the memorable side, instead of just adding a company touch and welcoming you to the team, have the CEO of the company write a short message about why the company selected this particular item for the employee. Now the clerk sees not just a $ 25 t-shirt, but a t-shirt that means something. Better yet, write the name of the employee.

On the education side, rather than one-way introductions, it is much better to involve the other person. Give them a project, let them start talking and collaborating with team members. Or get creative with it and instead of making them sit through back-to-back Zoom presentations, turn some of the material into an internal podcast they can listen to or short asynchronous videos they can watch on their own time, before coming back and chatting. with team members about what they learned.

3. Make targeting feel like the customer experience.

A great exercise to test your onboarding experience is to put new hires in the shoes of the company's customers.

If your company specializes in high-level customer service, design the onboarding experience to feel equally high-level. If your strategy is all about innovation and speed to market, make your onboarding experience quick and inventive.

4. Create cohorts of 3-6 people

I am a strong advocate of creating small cohorts in the range of three to six people, and then giving those people time to themselves in a private space. Not all companies will hire on such a scale, but to the extent that you can schedule your onboarding so that you have at least three people joining at any given time (or dividing larger onboarding classes into subgroups of 3-6), this leads to emotionally important quality time.

You're excited, a little nervous, and that combination is ready to create lasting bonds.

Then set up that group for one hour each day for the first week to connect and share with each other what they are learning, how they feel, etc. Better yet, give them some autonomy: make them a private Slack channel so they can chat during the day, give them some icebreakers to facilitate on their own, and even a challenge for them to work together.

5. Build moments of adrenaline

There is fascinating research on the memorability of high adrenaline moments.

Now this doesn't mean that your onboarding experience has to involve jumping out of a plane. But it's worth asking how you can create an experience that feels in addition to the one that is logically received.

This could be something like:

  • A physical or digital treasure hunt
  • A recruiting pitch competition
  • A collaborative icebreaker game

6. Design from the offer letter to the end of year 1

New employee anxiety tends to be rooted in uncertainty.

Most companies think of onboarding only in the first few days. In reality, if you can design the experience from the offer letter to the end of the first year, you can create a much stronger “story arc” and be more intentional about how you make each new hire feel.

For example, what are the communications before the first day? The more new employees who can know what to expect on their "first day of school," the more comfortable they will feel. How about sending a physical or digital welcome kit in advance? How can you show them that you welcome them with open arms, instead of appearing wondering if they are ready?

Be careful though: I've seen companies take this too far by asking the new hire to invest a significant amount of time and energy before their first day. “Pre-read this whole context. Here are a dozen different documents. Get acquainted and see you soon. "

This is greedy, and most of the time, this individual is still tying up loose ends with his previous job.

7. Define the "moments that matter" and elevate them

It's hard to know when to celebrate if you get an offer letter. The moment you get it? After the negotiations look settled? After officially signing the papers?

There is a great opportunity for companies here to make new hires feel celebrated by declaring moments of celebration throughout the hiring and onboarding process. Once the papers are signed, can you send them a digital card signed by all the members of that person's team? And then at the end of the official induction, how about another moment of celebration, a toast, a badge, a defining checkpoint of completion?

8. Facilitate networking

We tend to think of networking externally, but it can and should also happen internally, within companies.

As much as possible, you want to optimize so that this person never comes into a situation where other people have to ask, "Wait, who are you?"

As soon as someone joins, the company must actively help that person connect with other members of the organization. This could be spontaneous 1: 1 chats, a schedule of predetermined team members to meet, or strategically choosing to connect with certain leaders within the organization for guidance and insight, almost like a mentorship. This kind of deliberate connection will become increasingly crucial in a hybrid virtual work environment where you can't bump into someone in the hallway and strike up a conversation.

9. Preserve the flow and storage of information

Nothing is more overwhelming than conflicting and disorganized information.

If your onboarding experience consists of giving new hires a Dropbox folder with 10 different decks, many of which share overlapping information with different inexplicable nuances, new hires will be confused and ready to fail. (This also leads to the individual taking on the burden of the organization, as opposed to the organization taking the burden off the individual.)

Instead, you want to design the onboarding process so that new hires only receive the information they absolutely need at that particular time. This prevents you from wasting a lot of time searching through documents and folders that consist largely of unnecessary information that does not yet apply to your daily responsibilities.

10. Don't forget the narration

Most importantly, a seamless and memorable onboarding experience is structured like a great movie.

You have a trailer that gives you an idea of ​​what the movie is about before entering the cinema. You have an introduction that sets the stage. There is some upward action that leads to climax (memorable moments of adrenaline). And then there's the top-down action, which allows the new hire to adjust to their new role.

It can be very easy to get involved in all the logistical aspects of onboarding: “This is how you do your job. This is how you sign up for these things. This is how you access your email. "But these are not the things that get people excited.

Instead, tell them the story of your future at the company. “Here are who we are. This is what we will do together. And here's why it's important. "

A strong onboarding process has a positive effect on new employee satisfaction, engagement, and performance. Without proper integration, negative effects can arise:

  • 5% of new hires quit immediately after a disastrous first day
  • 20% of new hires will leave within the first 45 days of employment.
  • Almost one in three new employees will leave the company (voluntarily or involuntarily) before the end of their first year

A good onboarding process leads to faster onboarding of new hires while reducing costs. Replacing an employee costs an organization between 50% and 150 on average

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A strong onboarding process has a positive effect on new employee satisfaction, engagement, and performance. Without proper integration, negative effects can arise:

  • 5% of new hires quit immediately after a disastrous first day
  • 20% of new hires will leave within the first 45 days of employment.
  • Almost one in three new employees will leave the company (voluntarily or involuntarily) before the end of their first year

A good onboarding process leads to faster onboarding of new hires while reducing costs. Replacing an employee costs an organization on average between 50% and 150% of the annual salary of the departing employee!

Onboarding looks different for each agency, but there are fundamental steps that I like to automate like this:

Send a welcome pack in Slack

I'm sure your agency already uses Slack. It is the most popular collaboration tool in the world. If not, sign up here for a free account.

It is customary to invite clients to a channel to keep in touch, share files, etc.

But did you know that you can set up automated workflows?

Yes.

These allow you to fully outsource many different processes, including onboarding.

Here's how to use it to send a welcome pack to new customers:

Step 1: create a new workflow automation

S

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Onboarding looks different for each agency, but there are fundamental steps that I like to automate like this:

Send a welcome pack in Slack

I'm sure your agency already uses Slack. It is the most popular collaboration tool in the world. If not, sign up here for a free account.

It is customary to invite clients to a channel to keep in touch, share files, etc.

But did you know that you can set up automated workflows?

Yes.

These allow you to fully outsource many different processes, including onboarding.

Here's how to use it to send a welcome pack to new customers:

Step 1: create a new workflow automation

Slack's workflow builder lets you automate anything imaginable.

This will avoid the burden of doing everything by hand.

Click on "Tools" under your account profile and "Workflow Builder" to create one from scratch or download a free template available directly from the official Slack site.

Instruct the workflow to begin when a new user (the customer) is added to a specific channel. Click "Edit" to adjust any workflow settings.

Ideally, you should send clients:

  • Case studies of previous works.
  • Links to project proposals or summaries.
  • Analytical and progress reports.
  • A good hello :)
  • Etc.

Proceed to the second step once you are done.

Step 2: add steps

Workflows can include multiple steps to automate numerous processes, gather information, and more.

Add another step, like submitting a questionnaire to learn more about the customer.

This information can be used to tailor your experience and improve your general service offerings. So there is one last thing I want you to do.

Step 3: add other users

Giving other Slack users permission to create and edit workflows takes this strategy one step further. Basically, you are automating automation. (Home, a lot?)

Follow these steps to do so:

Discuss the workflows you'd like your team to create (like the one in this article) so they can get started while you protect customer projects.

That brings me to my next idea.

Use Zapier to manage projects

Projects can be a huge hassle.

You have to manage deadlines, teams and make sure the customer is satisfied.

That's where Zapier comes in.

This is a free (and paid) tool used to automate everything under the sun. Also known as if-this-then-that or IFFT for short.

Connect any combination of tools and create sequences between them.

Here's some brain food - use it to automate customer onboarding by instantly creating a Trello card when a new customer is added to a Slack channel. (Read my Slack vs Basecamp guide if you're looking for alternatives.)

Here's how you can do that:

Step 1: create a new Zap

Hover over the black plus button and create a new Zap from the dash.

You can have five Zaps with a free account and paid plans to increase this limit.

Step 2: add slack

Then find Slack and add it as the first step.

Add the "New User" trigger event to trigger automation.

Continue with the third step later.

Step 3: connect Trello

Add a second step and search for Trello.

Select the "Create Card" action event that will create a new Trello card when a user is added to Slack.

Choose the correct one, assemble, list and personalize the card with the customer's information.

Enjoy automated onboarding and project management!

Set up recurring payments

Finance and accounting are not to everyone's liking.

There is no need to sweat. You can also automate them.

This will change depending on the exact tool used to send invoices and collect payments, but let's take a look at PayPal to illustrate.

Step 1: create a new invoice

Login to PayPal and create a new invoice.

Fill in the required information, including yours, the customer's, and the order lines.

Step 2: choose the recurring option

PayPal offers several different billing frequencies, including weekly, monthly, quarterly, yearly, and custom.

Access these by clicking "Frequency" and selecting an option.

Step 3: save the recurring invoice

Once the invoice details are complete, the last step is to submit it.

Click on the invoice "Start Series" to do so.

The invoice will then be sent to the customer as often as they choose and can be changed later by editing the invoice settings.

Who doesn't want to provide encouraging experiences to new hires in an office? Here are some ideas that can help you improve the employee onboarding process.

A proper onboarding process is essential in the workplace to ensure your new hire is welcomed, feels valued and supported during the first few days with you, and becomes productive just like other team members.

According to some research, positive onboarding processes help retain employees. 69% of employees are said to stay longer than 3 years if they experience better onboarding. More re

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Who doesn't want to provide encouraging experiences to new hires in an office? Here are some ideas that can help you improve the employee onboarding process.

A proper onboarding process is essential in the workplace to ensure your new hire is welcomed, feels valued and supported during the first few days with you, and becomes productive just like other team members.

According to some research, positive onboarding processes help retain employees. 69% of employees are said to stay longer than 3 years if they experience better onboarding. Additional investigations restore 20% of employee turnover during the first 45 days of their stay in the organization. This shows the crucial need to improve the onboarding process.

If you're trying to improve your employee onboarding process, take a look at the following helpful tips:

1. Don't wait to sign the contract to hire an employee

If you don't onboard an employee until you sign a dotted line, then you've already gone a long way from the smooth onboarding process.

Every business requires a comprehensive, customized strategy for onboarding based on job, team, department, and location. You should consider that your company is 'onboarding' a new employee from the moment you accept the offer letter until the moment of induction (it can also include a trial period).

2. Focus on improving the employee experience

Improving the employee experience is critical to ensuring you retain a large group of people in your organization. Research by Jacob Morgan conducted by 250 companies says that organizations that invest more in improving the employee experience make four times more profit than those that do not.

3. Try to customize the onboarding as much as possible

Although there will be a pre-established onboarding process in organizations, such as IT setup, orientation, culture, strategy, and organizational values, most of them are well-tailored based on job title, department, or team.

But the onboard personalization will create an amazing impression on the new hire, making them feel special, valued and supported. This will have more effect than typical induction.

4. Allow new hires to give their opinion / feedback

Do you think new hires will say your company is terrible on its first day? Apparently not. But if you allow them to give honest feedback, they are more likely to be able to help find solutions to unfamiliar problems.

The onboarding process brings a new perspective to your organization. Don't be skeptical to find out what new hires like and dislike so far in your organization, at least making it easy for them to remain anonymous.

5. Thoroughly review and refine your onboarding process

Every time you bring a new employee to the organization, you have the opportunity to learn something while on the job and learn about the areas that can be further improved.

You know that each person will have different expectations about the onboarding process and that the same process in an organization is experienced differently by each individual. So, try to collect more opinions on it and analyze to create more sophisticated, refined and intelligent processes.

Here are some questions you can ask new hires to improve the onboarding process:

· How was your experience in the incorporation process?

· What was the most effective part?

· Was there something missing that would have made your early days more special?

· What did you like the most / least in this process?

Onboarding is a vital process that should be periodically reviewed and refined based on the experience of new hires. This is crucial to retain the best talent to grow your own business. Try to invest time and money in it, as I am pretty sure you will get better returns.

Twitter is really known for having an excellent onboarding process. I think the question should be what could be learned from your onboarding process. As a marketing assistant who has done a lot of research to improve onboarding processes, Twitter has always been a recommended reference to follow. After further researching why, here are the good points I learned from their onboarding process:

1. "Yes to the table"

It's about making sure that everything is simple and welcoming to new hires from the moment they say yes to the job until they are brought to their desks. Of course this means

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Twitter is really known for having an excellent onboarding process. I think the question should be what could be learned from your onboarding process. As a marketing assistant who has done a lot of research to improve onboarding processes, Twitter has always been a recommended reference to follow. After further researching why, here are the good points I learned from their onboarding process:

1. "Yes to the table"

It's about making sure that everything is simple and welcoming to new hires from the moment they say yes to the job until they are brought to their desks. Of course, this means making sure the instructions are clear and that some requests are granted on the part of the new hire. Twitter does a great job of that, making sure your new hires get everything they need to feel comfortable.

Twitter has also set out to celebrate new hires even with drinks. That, of course, makes it easier for the new hire and the rest of the team to get to know each other.

2. Interaction with new employees

I have read that during lunch breaks, a manager joins the new hires. This is to provide them with a familiar face so it is also easy for them to socialize with other employees on the team. I think many companies overlook the importance of making sure their employees have company.

On a large team like the one on Twitter, for example, it's hard for a new hire to find their own way of getting to know others, especially if they're not exactly outgoing people.

3. Openness to improvement

I think this is the most admirable quality of the Twitter onboarding process. At the end of the process, they coordinate with their new hires for feedback. Some companies think that the best way to see if an onboarding process was successful is simply to see how your new hire is performing at work. That doesn't really leave room for improvement, and it doesn't necessarily mean that the new hire is comfortable.

It's important to start a conversation with the new hire to see how they feel about the process. This conversation will not only help new hires feel more at home with the new company. It will also give employers many ideas that they could use to continually strengthen their onboarding process.

When I found out about the Twitter onboarding process, it even made me feel like I wanted to be a part of their team. Most importantly, though, as a marketing assistant, your onboarding process really inspired me and probably many other teams as well. I think it is quite difficult to pinpoint any particular part of your process that you need to improve when it is your process that has taught others the most.

Onboarding, sometimes known as organizational entry, is the process organizations use to socialize and acclimate a new hire to the culture and work life of an organization. The idea that onboarding also helps an organization discover and make use of the unique strengths of each new hire is often overlooked.

The following onboarding checklists are for human resource managers or departments to use when helping a new employee to integrate into the company. Of course, certain tasks, such as required paperwork or required reading, will differ by company or position.

Before the first D

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Onboarding, sometimes known as organizational entry, is the process organizations use to socialize and acclimate a new hire to the culture and work life of an organization. The idea that onboarding also helps an organization discover and make use of the unique strengths of each new hire is often overlooked.

The following onboarding checklists are for human resource managers or departments to use when helping a new employee to integrate into the company. Of course, certain tasks, such as required paperwork or required reading, will differ by company or position.

Before the first day

  • Acquire the necessary documentation (W-4, I-9, insurance forms, direct deposit forms)
  • Ask the new hire to review the company's employee handbook and sign a confidentiality agreement.
  • Prepare a workstation for your new hire
  • Gather necessary tools, including technology, such as a computer, and / or access to required software (i.e. Photoshop)
  • Provide the new hire with a company email
  • Provide new hires with reading material, including company-wide policies and procedures, an organizational chart and a description of their role, as well as the company values, mission, and culture.

In the first day:

  • Provide the new employee with all the necessary information, including the dress code, where to park, what time to arrive, and what to bring.
  • Prepare al equipo con anticipación: hágales saber que el nuevo empleado está llegando, para que puedan saludarlo cuando llegue a su estación de trabajo.
  • Reserve tiempo en el calendario de su equipo para un almuerzo de "bienvenida" para el nuevo empleado y dígaselo con anticipación.
  • Give your new hire a tour of the office, including bathrooms, kitchen, and support desk
  • Set up a 1:1 between manager and employee, so the manager can explain what is expected of the new hire, how the department is structured, and answer questions the new hire might have
  • Assign the new hire a mentor, and ask the mentor to set up a time to have lunch with the new hire
  • Give new hire a "30-day plan", with reading material and important information regarding what is expected of his/her first month on the team

During Week One:

  • Consider asking both new hire and manager to take the DiSC, if they haven't already -- understanding work personalities can help 1:1's go more smoothly
  • Have 1:1 with the manager and new hire, in which manager explains how she expects 1:1's to go, and how she wants the new hire to prepare for each 1:1 meeting
  • Within the first few days, assign the first project to your new hire. This will help him/her feel like a valuable asset to the team, and allow him/her to become more comfortable in his/her role
  • Ensure all required paperwork is filled out
  • Review employee performance evaluations, and set goals for month one
  • If necessary, set aside time to teach new hire how to use new software

For the First Month:

  • Set up weekly meetings to give your new hire constructive criticism regarding his/her first couple assignments
  • Provide his/her with additional reading material as you see fit -- perhaps you suggest books related to his/her role, or articles you feel will help with him/her professional growth
  • Check-in that he/he is meeting the appropriate people and getting lunch or coffee with core members of the team
  • Ask for feedback from the new hire(s) -- if its a large group, offer the option to fill out an anonymous survey. If you have only one new hire, simply ask him/her what else he/she needs to succeed or what he/she wishes the company provided
  • Organize a team outing to help the new hire bond with the team -- if dinner is difficult to plan, consider getting lunch with the team away from the office
  • Ask his/her mentor to check-in with him/her

To know more about onboarding processes and best practice, you can join Compliance Prime webinars for onboarding processes.

Treat your new hires like you would like to be treated yourself, or else ... Welcome to the employee onboarding hall of shame, bringing you the bad and the ugly of new hire orientation and outlining solutions for common onboarding mistakes.

MAKING ONBOARDING A COMMUNAL RESPONSIBILITY.

Nothing screams "you're going to enjoy working here" more than arbitrarily assigning an untrained mentor from a group of equally disoriented colleagues to lead an already agitated new hire. Who doesn't like to feel like a burden and a distraction caught in the middle of someone else's busy day?

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Trate a sus nuevos empleados como le gustaría que lo trataran a usted mismo, o de lo contrario ... Bienvenido al salón de la vergüenza de la incorporación de empleados, que le ofrece lo malo y lo feo de la orientación de nuevos empleados y ofrece soluciones para los errores comunes de incorporación.

HACER DE LA INCORPORACIÓN UNA RESPONSABILIDAD COMUNAL.

Nothing shouts "you are going to enjoy working here" more than arbitrarily assigning an untrained mentor from a pool of equally disoriented colleagues to take around an already agitated new hire. Who doesn't like feeling like a liability and a distraction stuck right in the middle of someone else's busy day, raise your hand!Having a strong team welcome in mind is all good and well but communal responsibility distribution means no one will be personally responsible for the new hire's long-term well-being, or the logistics of orientation activities on their very first day at work.Even if your organization is just starting off with employee onboarding, you will be better off either curating the necessary activities yourself, or building up a team of designated, trained and keen "Onboarding Ambassadors". Inspire and educate your employees about the importance of proper new hire orientation before said new hire's day one - and when the time comes, you will have a pool of pre-vetted onboarding stars to choose from to take your new hire around for what has to be one of the most engaging days of their office life.

PLANNING 3+ HOURS OF ACTIVITIES TO KILL ALL THE VIBES.

Piling up paperwork and arbitrary training activities regardless of the employee's seniority or profile builds up to a blatantly boring start,Delayed gratification of thoughtfully spaced out documentation presented later on during their training and orientation period will yield higher read-through rates at the very minimum, and produce 100% less extremely bored new hires overall.

BUILDING A ONE-FOR-ALL WELCOME.

From your newest CTO to your last-minute incoming intern - your HR department has gone to great lengths to scout, source, interview and keep the latest hire. Your marketing department has been working tirelessly on building the perfect employer brand online, your highly sought after candidate has signed the contract after hard negotiations and... There you are giving them that same welcome pack you haven't had time to neither update, nor, realistically, even read through since 2015 because ain't nobody got time for that.You know what new employees don't have time for? Doing orientation activities that are not related to their role, department or seniority levels. Going through the assigned corporate motions is crucial for signing documents and getting the paperwork out of the way, but it can and should be done during the pre-boarding phase, while leaving the new and exciting bits and pieces for Day 1.

OFFERING THE ULTIMATE RELAXATION ON DAY 1.

Letting your newest employee stroll in unnoticed and unannounced may seem like a good plan that won't interrupt your existing employees' activities, but most likely having a way-too-relaxed Day 1 on the job will just make your newest hire feel unsure whether the company needed their skills and expertise in the first place.There is comfortable and friendly, then there is plain sloppy and disorganized - you want your new hires to feel at home, but lack of structured employee onboarding during the first few weeks can make any newcomer feel disoriented instead of welcome. First day on the job should include both welcome events and opportunities to jump start on tackling real job responsibilities. Make sure to include 1:1 meetings into their first week, as well as present the first of many long-term projects to give new hires the taste for their future day-to-day in the office from the get-go.

OVER-PROMOTING BRAND ADVOCACY.

You want your new graduate hires in particular to become your brand advocates some day, but you also want to control your brand image. If you are looking for your new hires to produce relevant digital content for your organization, you need to dedicate time and effort first: suggest social strategies and guidelines, create inspiring photo backdrops, productive events and activities in real life.Digital giants know how to build their environments to be both awe- and Insta-inspiring, just have a glance at these stunning Google Dublin Headquarters (warning: procrastination content inside). That being said, Google's famous Noogler onboarding process lasts up to half a year, includes personal training and is followed-up by regular check-ins for months after, going above and beyond social media photo ops http://alone.In case if you haven't had an opportunity to grow a tropical forest in your coffee area just yet, a more targeted approach to new hire's social media is required.

Why not take this opportunity to arrange their desk with welcome gifts and signs, offer to take a photo with the CEO or take a snap at some of the orientation activities if you have a number of newbies joining at once. In case if a social media opportunity hasn't presented itself on Day 1, wouldn't it be better to wait until your new colleagues are fully acclimatized and genuinely happy to snap away without the pressures of having just walked into a new office?

PREVENTION IS THE BEST SOLUTION: GET LIVE ONBOARDING ADVICE FROM OUR CEO

Have these in mind when approaching your new hire onboarding strategy or reserve your seat at our Free Onboarding Webinar to get the latest scoop on what your organization should do instead. Build a tailored onboarding strategy for your team using actionable advice from Talmundo's very own Stijn De Groef and HR Director at Firmenich Xavier Baechler live on June 29th @ 2:30pm CET / 1:30pm GMT.

I work in a digital agency, and we follow a 6-step onboarding process. It seems like a long procedure but since we put it on a checklist using Process Street, it has been way easier for us and the clients.

Here's how it looks like:

  • Agreement and payment

It all begins when the client starts signing the deal with your firm. This process is where our agency presents a proposal for the client to sign.

It also implies payment since, of course, that is the starting signal of the whole process. We all know that this is not easy with the documents and the invoice that must be settled. However, we have an automatism

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I work in a digital agency and we follow a 6-step onboarding process. It sounds like a long procedure, but since we put it on a checklist using Process Street, it has been a lot easier for us and the clients.

This is what it looks like:

  • Agreement and payment

It all starts when the client begins to sign the deal with your company. This process is where our agency presents a proposal for the client to sign.

It also involves the payment as, of course, that's the go-signal for the entire process. We all know this isn't simple with the documents and invoice that have to be settled. However, we have an automated onboarding process so we use Practice Ignition to piece everything together digitally.

  • Questionnaire

This is a mandatory step in our onboarding process. It helps us obtain enough data about the clients to serve them well and it also enables us to ask them for referrals.

Our questionnaire asks things like contact and business information, their goals and expectations for the agreement, etc.

  • Getting started with the project

This is where we introduce the client to the team working on the project. We make sure that the team we assign is fully familiar with the concepts, timelines, client background, and the objectives for the project.

We use client management software to keep a professional and seamless communication line between our clients and the team. Then we use project management software for the workflow which the client can join so that they can collaborate with the team.

  • Welcome package

Once all the plans are laid out, the team sends a follow-up email expressing gratitude. The email also contains our digital welcome package to officially kick off the whole project.

  • Checkup Call

After a month, we always make a checkup call with the team and the client to get updates about their project's progress. Also, it enables us to ask about the client's experience so far.

Once everything's already going smooth, it just means that the onboarding process is complete and it's on to customer success.

This is very much a “How long is a piece of string?” question.

For me, there is no set time frame for the process, rather there is an end goal in mind that you want to achieve. In my opinion, the goal of the process is to move someone from selection to becoming productive in their roles.

For some roles it may only be a short period, or others may take longer. It should include all the important compliance steps and data collection that an employer needs to support the employee, as well as guidance within the company, their team, and the role. You should also try and include

Keep reading

This is very much a "How long is a piece of string?" question.

For me, there is no set time frame for the process, rather there is an end goal in mind that you want to achieve. In my opinion, the goal of the process is to move someone from selection to becoming productive in their roles.

For some roles that may only be a short period, or others it may take longer. It needs to include all of the important compliance steps and data collection that yan employer needs to support the employee as well as orientation within the company, their team, the role. It also needs to try and include ways to model success in the role so that people can move through probation and complete their onboarding journey.

Onboarding is a more comprehensive term than orientation, which is what many companies call their initial interactions with new hires. This typically includes a review of the company's history and official culture, relevant HR processes and benefits, any information or expectations from across the organization, and a general basis on where the person works now, what is expected, what what is allowed and what is not accepted, along with identification. key people in the organization and where to go with questions.

In many cases, the specific department does the same at a more local level.

When this process is finished with

Keep reading

Onboarding is a more comprehensive term than orientation, which is what many companies call their initial interactions with new hires. This typically includes a review of the company's history and official culture, relevant HR processes and benefits, any information or expectations from across the organization, and a general basis on where the person works now, what is expected, what what is allowed and what is not accepted, along with identification. key people in the organization and where to go with questions.

In many cases, the specific department does the same at a more local level.

Cuando este proceso se realiza con atención a los detalles, mucha discusión interactiva y la voluntad de la empresa para escuchar y el nuevo empleado para preguntar, puede hacer que el comienzo del trabajo de una nueva persona parezca mucho más cómodo.

WHen done poorly, such as a revolving series of speeches or videos by VIPS, with little discussion or actual interaction, it can be damaging to the chances for a long-term relationship.

John

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