What entry-level jobs pay more than $ 65,000 a year?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Xavi Rivera



What entry-level jobs pay more than $ 65,000 a year?

I can only talk about what I know but in this case it would be the oil / chemical industry. I have worked for both.

In both cases, the daily needs of the facilities are carried out by the Operators. These people are responsible for the actual operation of the plant.

Basic requirements? No criminal record, pass an in-depth background check, pass a full DOT physical, and pass various aptitude tests and even a basic psychological evaluation.

The youngest operator I have ever worked with was 24 years old and earned the same high dollar salary as his older co-workers. Although your employment history is important, it is h

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I can only talk about what I know but in this case it would be the oil / chemical industry. I have worked for both.

In both cases, the daily needs of the facilities are carried out by the Operators. These people are responsible for the actual operation of the plant.

Basic requirements? No criminal record, pass an in-depth background check, pass a full DOT physical, and pass various aptitude tests and even a basic psychological evaluation.

The youngest operator I have ever worked with was 24 years old and earned the same high dollar salary as his older co-workers. Although your work history is important, it is your performance that judges you.

What can you expect

  • Months and months of training, up to a year
  • Exceptional knowledge of security and compliance with those protocols.
  • Personal responsibility for your actions. Failure to do so is grounds for termination.
  • Learning procedure after procedure. Everything you do is procedural
  • Know how to make a decision quickly. Things rarely go wrong, but when they do there is no time to go back and have a meeting.
  • Expect long 12 hour shifts day and night

The reward? Some of the best benefits found, free college education, great retirement plans, and annual salaries in excess of $ 100K if you choose to work longer.

It is not for everyone, but if your youth and your life is not very complicated, why not! That 24-year-old I mentioned paid for his new home in less than six years :)

If you have the right education, training, and certification, some professions pay well at the entry level.

Entry-level physicians make $ 150,000 or more in the US.

Registered nurses earn more than $ 65,000 a year at most US locations.

If you are at the peak of skill and talent in athletics, you can earn a great salary once you turn pro. Newbies to the most popular professional sports earn hundreds of thousands of dollars a year.

If you are an average person with no post-secondary experience or education, you will have to work for years to achieve an annual salary of $ 65,000.

Transportation manager

  • Average Earnings Per Hour - $ 52.00
  • On-the-job training: none. The

    real estate brokers can earn much more than 65k ... but probably in its first year.

    Property managers can almost earn 65k

Here are some excerpts from the main question and an article on the subject.

  • Operator - Oil / Chemical Industry
  • Transportation manager
  • Property manager

Here's a list of 20, but most require a college degree.

20 Jobs You Can Make $ 60,000 Out of College Discover interesting, well-paying, entry-level jobs.

Here are some excerpts from the main question and an article on the subject.

  • Operator - Oil / Chemical Industry
  • Transportation manager
  • Property manager

Here's a list of 20, but most require a college degree.

20 Jobs You Can Make $ 60,000 Out of College Discover interesting, well-paying, entry-level jobs.

Hi, In the main job I had before becoming a freelancer, back in the 1990s, I started with around $ 25,000 / year and finished around $ 40,000 / year just before quitting. At the time, my wife and I lived in a 1,000-square-foot apartment. We carefully tracked our expenses and in a typical month we spent $ 1,700 on everything, total (food, gas, rent, insurance, utilities, everything). Keep this figure in mind for later.

I live in a mid-size city in the US and earn more than $ 300,000 a year from my businesses. In general, it is much, much better than making $ 100,000 per year or less. I will try to give some ideas.

After

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Hi, In the main job I had before becoming a freelancer, back in the 1990s, I started with around $ 25,000 / year and finished around $ 40,000 / year just before quitting. At the time, my wife and I lived in a 1,000-square-foot apartment. We carefully tracked our expenses and in a typical month we spent $ 1,700 on everything, total (food, gas, rent, insurance, utilities, everything). Keep this figure in mind for later.

I live in a mid-size city in the US and earn more than $ 300,000 a year from my businesses. In general, it is much, much better than making $ 100,000 per year or less. I will try to give some ideas.

After we quit our jobs and got some clients, we made about $ 100,000 a year for several years. This seemed like a lot, and we were able to move out of the apartment into a decent house. It still seemed like a great income, although in hindsight we weren't saving as much. In a few years we bought a bigger house and moved in, selling the old one. The mortgage payments on the new house seemed exaggerated and I remember being worried about them. I think they all said it was going to cost around $ 1,500 a month.

During this time, I decided that my goal should be to earn $ 250,000 a year. That sounded like A LOT. I felt that if we could do so much, then we had accomplished it. I promised myself that once we made that much money in a single year, I would buy a fully equipped home theater system that could cost $ 10,000. After all, if you are making $ 250,000, what is $ 10,000?

I have never bought that system yet! :-)

Eventually we acquired another company, and in the mid-2000s we had a good year where our revenue reached $ 270,000. Exciting! But then it dropped back down to $ 114,000 the following year and stayed at $ 100,000 for a few years, as the earnings of the self-employed can go up and down significantly. It even went down to $ 88,000 a year not too long ago.

Since then it has continued to rise, thankfully. $ 137K, $ 233K, $ 378K, $ 430K, and around $ 519,000 for 2015 (that's an estimate). Note that these amounts include business earnings, which are not always withdrawn as personal spending money (distributions). But they are taxed every year!

We do not live an extravagant lifestyle by any means. I drive a very old car, for example. But our cost of living keeps going up and up. Health insurance, mortgage, food, utilities in the largest house, yard maintenance, a new roof, iPhones, Netflix, etc. all add up. Now, do you remember how we lived for $ 1,700 a month in the apartment?

That is less than our mortgage payment now! Our health insurance costs around $ 750 a month! Mad.

Anyway, what is it like to earn more than $ 300,000 a year? The first thing is taxes. When you earn less, you don't think as much about taxes. But once you get into these much higher numbers, the tax payments start to be staggering. We will pay more taxes for 2015 than all of our annual gross income for virtually any year from 1993 to 2006. So, taxes have a huge impact, and you really feel it. I have no problem paying taxes, I am happy to support my country, but yes, it hurts a little to see that so much money is lost. And you have to pay estimated taxes on a quarterly basis and they keep going up and up every year in incredible amounts.

But I will say that there is a lot of cash left. You begin to feel that the amounts that used to seem significant no longer worry you much. When you have $ 400,000 in cash in your bank accounts (not including retirement accounts), then the idea of ​​spending a few hundred or even a few thousand on something seems almost irrelevant. Especially when you know it will bring in another $ 400-500k (gross) in the current year. I mean, what is the difference between $ 400,000 and $ 395,000? They start to look like the same number, more or less.

However, at the same time, I am still a very frugal person. It is not necessarily easy to spend those hundreds that I mentioned. I will not buy expensive cars, watches, clothes, toys, or vacations. I would like to take a vacation in Europe and I would have no mental problem with spending $ 5,000 on that, but I don't want to waste money or spend it frivolously.

So I think he largely retains whatever his old attitude towards money was. Living cheaply in our old apartment, we developed a rather frugal attitude. So now we have money, but that attitude remains.

The funny thing is, now that our income is so much higher and we have money in the bank, I really want more! I want to make $ 600k or $ 700k or a million in a single year. They say that people always think they will be happy when they have / earn about twice what they currently do. I guess it applies. When we hit $ 27,000 that year, I probably thought $ 500,000 would be enough. Now that we've done it, I feel like a million would be enough. And so it goes.

With this level of income, we cannot buy things like Lamborghinis. I mean ... we could, we have the cash on hand to buy one easily. But it would be incredibly stupid to waste our money like that.

Instead, we'd really like to fully fund our retirement and, in a way, take a leap forward in that regard by setting aside maybe $ 200,000 just for that purpose. A few years ago we thought we would need to save $ 30,000 a year to comfortably reach retirement, so starting with a large amount would be wonderful.

Currently I have spent a lot of time looking for how to invest our free cash and / or create or buy another business. I hope to find something quite passive but that allows us to turn our savings of $ 400,000 into a lot more. Some of the things I have looked at include buying rental real estate, selling on Amazon, reinvesting more in one of my companies, and the good stock market. It's a bit of a pain to have all that cash in hand, earning only about 0.95% interest each year (yay for Discover Bank!).

I'm a bit lazy ... sometimes I want to start another company and really get things going and sell it for millions or billions in a few years (you know ... like WhatsApp :-)) ... other times just I want to laze around and watch movies on our old big-screen TV (you know, the rear-projection kind). That's right, we haven't upgraded since we bought that one in 2001 with a bonus money a client gave me for working over the weekend.

Oh, and it seems like the old saying about having multiple sources of income is true. We have the two companies with wages and earnings, some other write-in earnings, income from a rental we own, and a little interest here and there.

There is a clear sense of security and a bit of a sense of having "accomplished." But just a little. I still look at all those who have sold their companies for large amounts, or the guys who make millions annually on Wall Street, and I envy their money and their success. So I guess no matter how much you have, there is always someone with more.

It depends on how easy is defined. Some jobs are easy to come by, but require difficult or unpleasant work. Others are hard to come by, but provide a relatively cool environment.

Being a college intern at a high-tech company is generally a fairly easy job (40 hours, less responsibility than full-time employees, free accommodation, inside work, generous benefits) and typically pays a little over $ 100,000 prorated. The problem is, it's pretty hard to get the job in the first place, and you probably had to work pretty hard in school to be considered. Even easier is to be a "lounging and acquiring" tech clerk with no real job like

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It depends on how easy is defined. Some jobs are easy to come by, but require difficult or unpleasant work. Others are hard to come by, but provide a relatively cool environment.

Being a college intern at a high-tech company is generally a fairly easy job (40 hours, less responsibility than full-time employees, free accommodation, inside work, generous benefits) and typically pays a little over $ 100,000 prorated. The problem is, it's pretty hard to get the job in the first place, and you probably had to work pretty hard in school to be considered. Even easier is being a "chill-out" tech employee with no actual job assignments, only paid for some kind of contractual or intellectual property reason.

Even easier may be being a semi-retired owner of an established business. Of course, starting a business is very difficult, but if you can get your top employees to do most of the actual work of running the business, you could be working well under 40 hours a week. Obviously getting to this point is incredibly difficult.

As for a job that is not very hard to get and that pays $ 100,000, in high school, I had a friend who worked laying out roads for a couple of summers. He worked 70 demanding and dangerous hours a week and had to spend many nights in boring little towns. But he was making over $ 2000 a week as a teenager with no college education or certificates, so he really didn't have to work very hard to get hired.

Investor.

The honest truth about being an investor is that the amount of work required is essentially nil.

You can put all of your capital in a low overhead index fund and then do nothing for the rest of your life thereafter; and still call yourself an investor.

Most people become investors by inheriting money from their parents; but some also do it by earning money in some way, so this part is not necessarily low at work. (Many of those who earn the money work very hard!)

But once you have enough capital, the job of being an investor requires only one

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Investor.

The honest truth about being an investor is that the amount of work required is essentially nil.

You can put all of your capital in a low overhead index fund and then do nothing for the rest of your life thereafter; and still call yourself an investor.

Most people become investors by inheriting money from their parents; but some also do it by earning money in some way, so this part is not necessarily low at work. (Many of those who earn the money work very hard!)

But once you have enough capital, investing work only requires the amount of time you want to put into it.

You can surely put 2,000 hours a year working hard to optimize your investments. But you can also choose to spend 2 hours a year and still get the same returns as the market average.

There is no boss. There are no office hours. There are no mandatory meetings. In fact, there is absolutely nothing you need to do beyond filing your taxes once a year. (And if you're just doing what I describe here, then that should be a simple job - I spend maybe an hour a year filing my taxes, and I'm both an investor and an employee.)

Ironically, Elizabeth Warren ...

- Crusade of the poor and oppressed billionaire - he earns that amount when he receives half of what the president earns for teaching at an elite university of liberal doctrine. Incredibly greedy? It must be, because that's more than the left's favorite demon, Dick Cheney, made less than that in the White House.

Elizabeth Warren Received Nearly $ 430,000 as a Professor at Harvard
Assachusetts Senate Candidate Elizabeth Warren received $ 429,981 as a Harvard Law Professor from 2010 to 2011 and received nearly $ 134,000 in legal consulting fees in 2010.

Warren's new personal finance

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Ironically, Elizabeth Warren ...

- Crusade of the poor and oppressed billionaire - he earns that amount when he receives half of what the president earns for teaching at an elite university of liberal doctrine. Incredibly greedy? It must be, because that's more than the left's favorite demon, Dick Cheney, made less than that in the White House.

Elizabeth Warren Received Nearly $ 430,000 as a Professor at Harvard
Assachusetts Senate Candidate Elizabeth Warren received $ 429,981 as a Harvard Law Professor from 2010 to 2011 and received nearly $ 134,000 in legal consulting fees in 2010.

Warren's new personal financial disclosure report recently filed with the Senate shows that he received $ 90,000 from a Florida law firm for his work as an expert witness against credit card companies in an antitrust case.

He also received $ 43,938 in consulting fees from Travelers Insurance in a legal case involving asbestos victims. Warren worked defending Travelers in a Supreme Court case involving a mining company that established a trust fund for asbestos victims.

By RACHEL M. WEHR, CONTRIBUTING WRITER April 10, 2013
Services http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2013/4/10/harvard_salaries_numbers/#48
As this week's scrutiny focuses on Harvard tenure, FM looks at how our teachers are really doing it for themselves.
$ 198,400 Average salary of a professor in 2012
$ 201,600 Average salary of a male professor in 2012 $ 187,500 Average
salary of a female professor in 2012

After college, just before getting married, I worked as a coin accountant for a public telephone company for a few months. People laugh when I tell them that I worked in a locked room 8 hours a day, passing coins through a coin machine while listening to the raid, but my obsessive nerdy side tickled him through the day optimizing my process of counting.

Open the door. Receive the cart of coin boxes. Close the door. Review time. Move the cart to the optimal cart position. Transfer the boxes to the prep table. Attach zip ties on all boxes (30-60). Move to the counting position with the clipboard. Document Box Number, Int Coin Dump

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After college, just before getting married, I worked as a coin accountant for a public telephone company for a few months. People laugh when I tell them that I worked in a locked room 8 hours a day, passing coins through a coin machine while listening to the raid, but my obsessive nerdy side tickled him through the day optimizing my process of counting.

Open the door. Receive the cart of coin boxes. Close the door. Review time. Move the cart to the optimal cart position. Transfer the boxes to the prep table. Attach zip ties on all boxes (30-60). Move to the counting position with the clipboard. Document box number, dump coins into counting machine, document total. Set the empty box aside. Repeat until the boxes are ready.

Repeat 15 to 20 times a day.

To her question, it was a dead end job with zero growth opportunities, but it helped me see some things about myself that have served me well later in life. I think it's important to consider any entry-level position in light of not just what it does for your career prospects, but what it will teach you about yourself.

If a job is sitting at your desk, alone, that's it. Just make up something that millions of people didn't know they needed.

A tool, a song, a book, any invention that many people want and pay for.

The Vicegrip in every home (don't sell the patent ...) Microsoft, the list is endless.

Nowadays it is difficult to get an entry level job. Today, you don't get a job without your identity.

But from my point of view, the skill of the entry-level work package, the summons, and how much you know becomes more useful.

But if you've applied for a job in a placement on time, you get a nice yearly packet on Company Rules, but even in this, your skill sees a lot of that.

I hope you find my answer useful

All entry-level jobs in the military have the same pay level. An E-3 systems administrator makes exactly the same amount of money as an E-3 infantryman or an E-3 cook.

Some branches may give you an enlistment bonus for some jobs; But that's more based on how desperate they are to fill that position compared to the true market value of the skill set. The Army Infantry currently has a large enlistment bonus.

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