What does work mean to you?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Thiago Reed



What does work mean to you?

I was employed for 52 years out of my total of 68 years. When I was a 14-year-old, I worked after school and full days on the weekends. At 17 I started working full time. In those days, work introduced me to new friends and money as well. I kept a small amount and gave the majority to my mother, who was a widow with three children alone.

At 24 I went to community college to get a diploma so I could quit the jobs I hated. Education made me realize that work could also have meaning and purpose in life, in addition to money and friends to have fun with.

Ironically, when I chose to get f

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I was employed for 52 years out of my total of 68 years. When I was a 14-year-old, I worked after school and full days on the weekends. At 17 I started working full time. In those days, work introduced me to new friends and money as well. I kept a small amount and gave the majority to my mother, who was a widow with three children alone.

At 24 I went to community college to get a diploma so I could quit the jobs I hated. Education made me realize that work could also have meaning and purpose in life, in addition to money and friends to have fun with.

Ironically, when I decided to focus on studying and practicing community service, I fell in love with a classmate. We were married three years later. We have been married for over 40 years and have two grown children. My husband encouraged me to go to college full time when we got married. I finished two grades, worked, and had a baby. Work and graduate school went hand in hand. In the field of adult education I called it: applied theory and theory in use. That meant I took the theory from school and tried to apply it to my work. Then I analyzed the results. If the theory didn't hold up in practice, I would come up with adaptations or a new theory to take to college. In that time I worked full time with 25 hours of course work spread over my husband and son's schedule. I felt like I was living the dream! No woman in my extended family had ever done such a thing. It was an ego boost. I would laugh with my husband because they told my mother that I would never finish high school.

Then six years later, I became pregnant with our second child, while I was still working and doing my part-time PhD studies. Although I got tired more easily, I still found my life to be satisfying. It was a shock when the doctor forced me off work two months before delivery. There is no school either! My life force felt sucked out. I thought it must be hormones, but then I realized that my ego was severely bruised. And without work or school I didn't have much of a social life.

One factor at the time was that my husband and I were working in the same place. Nor did I see him all day as he was used to. The extrovert in me was isolated and I was afraid if I could take on the only job as a housewife. That led to horrible fears and phobias that took a while to resolve.

Becoming a stay at home mom was the most challenging, challenging, and exhausting job of my life. However, it was the most educational and rewarding once I decided to tell myself that I was destined to learn from my children, their development, their uniqueness, and their common ground. It made me learn who I was as a person with concrete changes in how I chose to live. Maternity leave was 17 weeks. I had no choice but to immerse myself in my work again. But as a different person with different priorities, I put different priorities in their place.

Home and personal care became the first responsibilities. Later, work and school had to occupy more uniform places. When our second son was three years old, it became clear that a final thesis would interfere with these new priorities. I quit the show. At night, my eighth grade teacher would chase my dreams and tell my mother that I was not destined to succeed. In fact, the headmaster would laugh at my nightmares that he had fulfilled his prophecy of being a deserter.

I've worked five jobs since the youngest was 3. That seems a lot and maybe unstable. Interestingly, each change helped me move up the career ladder. As I climbed up, I slowly returned to multitasking and juggling. Every step in salary and responsibilities created more stress for me.

When I started writing this answer to the question, I had an idea of ​​the direction my answer would take. I've gotten to the point of moving toward life lessons on what work means to me. I had made the decision to retire. It turned out that I was so committed to the development of the organization that I always accepted the board's need for me for two years longer than I wanted to be there. I used all my old hard work habits. But at that point I had totally lost the ability to read my own balance needs. The resentment increased. I found myself irritated and angry at even the smallest things. I tried to suppress them. Exhaustion increased. The physical ailments turned into chronic pain and reduced mobility. I knew inside me that I was sabotaging my body and my mind.

At the end of the two years that I had been engaged, it was clear that others did not want me to leave even though they were all trained to take on various responsibilities. So I told the president that everyone was able to move on without me as soon as I got out of his way. He trusted me to agree as long as he was a phone call away.

That was two years ago. What I hadn't realized at the time, I had had the experience of walking away from work when I was pregnant 26 years earlier, which was very overwhelming. Retirement has had excruciating moments, almost every two years. With some moments of great joy interspersed, the two years left me with the same loss as during prenatal care. Isolation, no friends because my only friends were at work. Living in a different city means that we don't socialize. In fact, we hadn't done it before either. After all, we were just friends from work. Then one day a person who knew me since we moved to this town 18 years ago said that I had been a workaholic. I denied it. How can it be. I lived and loved work for its meaning and purpose to help others. My husband did not say he was a workaholic, but he tirelessly devoted himself to his health care work. Our adult children are glad that we are finally taking care of ourselves. In fact, they have both been thrilled when each told us at different times that our dedication to work has taken its toll. It has aged us. However, they are hopeful that if we work to support each other we will now be able to live a happy, healthy and long life. They were both excited when each told us at different times that our dedication to work has taken its toll. It has aged us. However, they are hopeful that if we work to support each other we will now be able to live a happy, healthy and long life. They were both excited when each told us at different times that our dedication to work has taken its toll. It has aged us. However, they are hopeful that if we work to support each other we will now be able to live a happy, healthy and long life.

This week I was at my doctor's office. He said I look much healthier than two years ago. I told him that I was surprised by the revelation that I had been a workaholic because I had no idea. I lived and loved what I did for the community and made a living. He smiled and shook my hand and said “… that's what an alcoholic also says. Everything is a question of balance ”.

To me? It has several different meanings depending on its use. It can be the simple scientific definition: the force required to move an object. It may be the result of efforts, one of my books is a work (noun); art work, carpentry, etc. Difficulty thinking about a problem can be hard work. From experience, I know that lifting a truck loaded with hay bales in an attic is hard work. Work can be a place of employment. It can be your career choice. It can be part of the structure of a fortification, the parapet. It can be an insult, "Well, aren't you a piece of work?"

I don't like when people complain about their work. For example, they complain that their work tires them too much. I firmly believe that if your job tires you too much, you should seriously quit and find a job that doesn't tire you as much. What's worse than the way they complain about how tired they are from their work (the ones who do it the way I write) want YOU to feel tired too even if you don't have the same job as them. I think people should find a job where they don't get too tired from so many times. People should also be aware that the very work that tires

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I don't like when people complain about their work. For example, they complain that their work tires them too much. I firmly believe that if your job tires you too much, you should seriously quit and find a job that doesn't tire you as much. What's worse than the way they complain about how tired they are from their work (the ones who do it the way I write) want YOU to feel tired too even if you don't have the same job as them. I think people should find a job where they don't get too tired from so many times. People should also be aware that the same work that tires you does not tire anyone else. There is a job that does not tire me very much, but that tires others, but there is also a job that tires me too much but that for other people it is not at all exhausting.

Today I went to the office.

The hallway lights were off. The VIP elevator was closed.

There was no one in sight.

Then I realized that it was a holiday 😆.

Still, I went to work.

For those of us who are true entrepreneurs and investors, work is fun.

And they pay us to have fun.

Life is an endless vacation full of fun! funny! and more fun!

Enjoy your work and life will turn into an endless vacation.

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