What does it mean to work?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Luke Ross



What does it mean to work?

"Work" means:

  • Have a paid job.

'the size of the workforce'

  • Dedicated to manual work.

'the vote is no longer enough protection for the worker'

  • Related to, suitable for or for the purpose of work.

'improvements in living and working conditions'

  • (of an animal) used in agriculture, hunting or for guard duty; not kept as a pet or for display

'the Norfolk Terrier was developed as a working dog on farms'

  • Running or capable of running.

'the mill still has a working water wheel'

  • (of parts of a machine) moving and making a machine work.

'the functional parts of a digital watch'

  • (from a theory, definition or title) used as the basis for a work or argument and likely to be developed or improved later.

'his working title for the book was Why People Are Poor'

  • Enough to work at a basic level.

'have a working knowledge of contract law'

noun

  • The action of doing a job.

'working with animals teaches patience'

  • Scheduled service or trip performed by a locomotive, train, bus, or other vehicle.

'the 37418 locomotive is often seen in this job'

  • The record of successive calculations performed to solve a mathematical problem.

'show operation details in your answer book'

If you have a problem with a word, type the word in Google and it will bring you several dictionaries, like this one: working | Definition of working in English by Oxford Dictionaries

"Meaning" has several meanings. To consider:

1. "Those dark clouds mean rain."
This is an example of natural meaning. In that case, we mean the correlations between things and the environment (for example, clouds and rain). To say that dark clouds mean rain is to say that if you see some dark clouds, there will probably be rain.

2. "'La neige est blanche' means that the snow is white."
This is an example of meaning in the conventional sense, or meaning of a sentence. In that case, we provide a translation of the selection in hideous quotes with what follows the 'that-' clause. As long as

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"Meaning" has several meanings. To consider:

1. "Those dark clouds mean rain."
This is an example of natural meaning. In that case, we mean the correlations between things and the environment (for example, clouds and rain). To say that dark clouds mean rain is to say that if you see some dark clouds, there will probably be rain.

2. "'La neige est blanche' means that the snow is white."
This is an example of meaning in the conventional sense, or meaning of a sentence. In that case, we provide a translation of the selection in hideous quotes with what follows the 'that-' clause. As long as the quoted sentence is correct, it follows that 'Snow is white' is also correct. The meaning of the sentence is relatively insensitive to the context in which it is spoken.

3. "When Sally said 'Could you pass me the tea?', She meant 'Please pass me the kettle.'
This is an example of the speaker's meaning (for an indicative sentence). In this case, we are trying to bring out the intention of the speaker (Sally) when making her statement. Specifically, it involves us thinking about what Sally intended to convey, and what she intended us to understand as intentionally conveyed. Unlike the meaning of the sentence, the meaning of the speaker is closely related to what the speaker intended in context; For example, if Sally already had the kettle and did not have the tea bags, then she might have meant "Please pass me the tea bags" and not "Please pass me the kettle."

There are at least two different characteristics that belong to all these different uses of "meaning." First, when something 'means' something else, we are making some kind of inference from a sign. We are discovering more (potentially surprising) information that we may not have had before. Second, in all cases, in a sense, we are allowed to make those inferences; that it is somehow correct to make those inferences, if we were in a position to do so. The short answer, then, is that "meaning" means correct inference from signs. (By 'sign' we mean something like: phenomena, sentences and statements).

While these different senses of meaning (1-3) share characteristics in common, they are also wildly different in many respects. For example, the inferences he draws from natural meaning (1) are highly defeatable, in the sense that dark clouds can mean rain without actually raining; however, the inferences drawn from the conventional meaning (2) are not rejected, since anytime "la neige est blanche" is correct, it must follow that the snow is white. Another example: the inferences you could appropriately draw from sentences (2) will be more or less the same in all contexts, regardless of what you would like to convey to the speaker, the inferences you would do well to draw from sentences (3) depend fundamentally on what the speaker would like to convey when speaking. So the general answer to the question "

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