What does a typical Goldman Sachs interview look like if one is applying for the Investment Banking Analyst Program? Explain to me the different rounds of interviews and some common pitfalls they present to candidates.

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Aiden Barr



What does a typical Goldman Sachs interview look like if one is applying for the Investment Banking Analyst Program? Explain to me the different rounds of interviews and some common pitfalls they present to candidates.

I'm not the best person to answer the question because I was hired for a technical position, and in those interviews they throw you a million C ++ questions. However, I have interviewed Goldman-Sachs and the people who work for GS, there are several characteristics of GS-style interviews.

In some ways, the question is easier to answer for GS than for other banks. Other banks often have very different hiring practices, so it could be that the person hiring at the fixed income desk is doing so radically different from the person at the stock desk. GS has a standard interview structure

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I'm not the best person to answer the question because I was hired for a technical position, and in those interviews they throw you a million C ++ questions. However, I have interviewed Goldman-Sachs and the people who work for GS, there are several characteristics of GS-style interviews.

In some ways, the question is easier to answer for GS than for other banks. Other banks often have very different hiring practices, so it could be that the person hiring at the fixed income desk is doing so radically different from the person at the stock desk. GS has a standard interview structure, which is quite well known on Wall Street, because there are a lot of GS alumni and you can find this if you interview for another company.

Usually what they will do is ask you a question, and if you answer it, they will make the questions increasingly difficult until you reach your limit. At that point, they will keep you on the edge of your abilities for an extended period of time (maybe several hours). The purpose of the interview is not to test what you know, but to test "intellectual stamina." They want to see how you perform when you are at the limit of your capacity and if you can be productive if you are operating at the limit for hours on end. They what to see if you give up or get tired, and how you think when you are very stressed and exhausted.

The other thing about GS is that its interview process is slower and more thorough than other banks. Many banks will hire quickly, but GS will generally put you through many rounds of interviews over several weeks. This is again to test the resistance. They also want a lot of people to interview you, and you have to impress them all.

Also, there is a particular personality that GS is looking for. If you talk to people who work for GS, you will notice that they have a particular personality. He's a bit introverted, very thoughtful, personable, a bit reserved. It is possible to "fake" this personality type, but one of the reasons you get subjected to many different rounds of interviews is that if you can "fake" a personality trait after going through many, many different hours, over several weeks , against intense questions between many different people, then you are not faking it.

One final thought. Goldman-Sachs is a great company, and as someone who has worked for a competitor, I have a lot of respect for them and the people who work there. They're not the only game in town though, and if you end up working there, great !!!, but if you don't fit in, there are other places you can work. The great thing about Wall Street is that there are so many different firms with so many different personalities, that you can find what suits your needs, and if nothing fits, it is not impossible to start your own firm.

One reason I can talk a lot about the GS hiring process and GS's personality is that I have had a really bad time with interviews at GS, and a lot of it has to do with cultural fit. Essentially, I talk too much, I'm too argumentative and a little too aggressive and impatient to really fit in. Again, I can modify my behavior and I try to do it, but the GS interview process is long and exhausting, so it really comes down to your core personality.

Different rounds of interviews

  1. Round One - Round One for Investment Banking Analysts is conducted through HireVue. It is a digitally recorded interview in which you record your response to some predetermined questions.
  2. Superday: In-person interviews with ~ 3 to 6 people.

I can talk more about how things are done behind the scenes if there is interest. Just let me know.

How is the interview

  1. Your history
    1. Tell me about yourself / guide me through your resume.
    2. Why investment banking?
    3. Why Goldman Sachs
    4. Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
  2. Behavioral
    1. What are your strengths?
    2. What are your weaknesses?
    3. Tell me about a ti
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Different rounds of interviews

  1. Round One - Round One for Investment Banking Analysts is conducted through HireVue. It is a digitally recorded interview in which you record your response to some predetermined questions.
  2. Superday: In-person interviews with ~ 3 to 6 people.

I can talk more about how things are done behind the scenes if there is interest. Just let me know.

How is the interview

  1. Your history
    1. Tell me about yourself / guide me through your resume.
    2. Why investment banking?
    3. Why Goldman Sachs
    4. Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
  2. Behavioral
    1. What are your strengths?
    2. What are your weaknesses?
    3. Tell me about a time when you did fill in the blank
  3. Resume
    1. Explain to me this project that you included in your resume during your last internship.
    2. How did you achieve any accomplishments you have on your resume during your last job?
    3. What was the strategic rationale behind this deal you worked on?
  4. Technical
    1. Explain to me how the $ 10 increase in D&A affects the 3 returns.
    2. What are the different valuation methodologies?
    3. Why do you think LBO offers the lowest valuation?
    4. Much more
  5. Market oriented (not as common as the ones above)
    1. Tell me about a M&A transaction that followed.
    2. What do you think of the market?
    3. What are some macro trends?
  6. Ending
    1. Do you have any question for me?
    2. If I give you an offer, would you accept?

Interview Questions for Goldman Sachs. How to prepare for an interview with Goldman Sachs.

Goldman has multiple rounds of interviews, like most other banks.

I interviewed at GS several times and have been on both sides of the interviews.

You cannot psyche yourself. I don't think we care much about your technical / financial knowledge.

I interviewed MBA graduates who were 5 years older than me, who had no prior banking experience, but who had little or no knowledge of finance that was relevant to investment banking.

When I dropped out of college, I thought I knew a lot about finance too.

I did not do it.

In banking, you

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Interview Questions for Goldman Sachs. How to prepare for an interview with Goldman Sachs.

Goldman has multiple rounds of interviews, like most other banks.

I interviewed at GS several times and have been on both sides of the interviews.

You cannot psyche yourself. I don't think we care much about your technical / financial knowledge.

I interviewed MBA graduates who were 5 years older than me, who had no prior banking experience, but who had little or no knowledge of finance that was relevant to investment banking.

When I dropped out of college, I thought I knew a lot about finance too.

I did not do it.

In banking, you will learn more in 2-3 months than in ALL of your undergraduate or MBA classes.

That is why we seek ATTITUDE and COMMITMENT. And, contrary to what most people tell you, we don't care if you're "cool." All we care about is whether you are willing to sacrifice your 20 years to produce a perfect working product.

If you have too much personality, we will not hire you because we believe that you will be motivated and tempted to have fun on the weekends and that you will quit once you know that you will need to be available 24/7.

So ... the trick to getting a banking job is ... SHOW NO WEAKNESS AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS WITH ONE APPROACH:

INTRODUCE THE INTERVIEWER WITH CONFIDENCE THAT YOU ARE WILLING TO SACRIFY EVERYTHING YOU HAVE TO PRODUCE A PERFECT WORK PRODUCT.

Send me a message if you want more information.

I have created courses and e-books on how to get a job in finance.

Get a financial job

Hopefully the following will come in handy:

  • I worked as an investment banking analyst at a couple of different banks in New York for almost 4 years in different areas (equity markets, restructuring). We hope these videos and sites below are helpful. I didn't have them around when I was interviewing, but they are fantastic. I wish I had them when I was interviewing and also when I was working.
  • Videos and sites:
  1. http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/guide-to-finance-interviews
  2. BIG Change: New WSO Technical and Behavioral Interview Guides
  3. Financial Modeling Videos - Investment Banking Videos - BIWS
  4. Fusion
Keep reading

Hopefully the following will come in handy:

  • I worked as an investment banking analyst at a couple of different banks in New York for almost 4 years in different areas (equity markets, restructuring). We hope these videos and sites below are helpful. I didn't have them around when I was interviewing, but they are fantastic. I wish I had them when I was interviewing and also when I was working.
  • Videos and sites:
  1. http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/guide-to-finance-interviews
  2. BIG Change: New WSO Technical and Behavioral Interview Guides
  3. Financial Modeling Videos - Investment Banking Videos - BIWS
  4. Mergers and Inquisitions / Breaking into Wall Street
  5. https://www.youtube.com/user/wallstreetprep
  6. https://www.wallstreetprep.com
  7. http://trainingthestreet.com/
  8. https://www.macabacus.com/
  • I have posted some technical questions that have tripped me up in the past, either in an interview or at work: Hi, answer to What are some investment banking interview technical questions that got wrong?
  • If you have questions about something or if you are looking for something, shout it out. He is not an expert by any means!

The interview process depends on the region you are applying to.

I did two interviews with Goldman Sachs IBD in Melbourne Australia for his full time analyst position a few months ago. The process was quite different from what I heard from people in the states.

There are no assessment centers for your campus recruitment here in Australia. You just have to do a few rounds of behavioral and technical interviews with almost every member of the team. They put a lot of emphasis on how well you can fit into their culture and how good you are at communicating with the different people on the team.

People were very p

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The interview process depends on the region you are applying to.

I did two interviews with Goldman Sachs IBD in Melbourne Australia for his full time analyst position a few months ago. The process was quite different from what I heard from people in the states.

There are no assessment centers for your campus recruitment here in Australia. You just have to do a few rounds of behavioral and technical interviews with almost every member of the team. They put a lot of emphasis on how well you can fit into their culture and how good you are at communicating with the different people on the team.

The people were very professional, nice and strict with the time limit. When they say they are going to give you a 30 minute interview, they are only going to give you 30 minutes for the interview. You have to use your time effectively and get straight to the point.

All the best with your interview. You'll do fine.

I went through the Operations hiring process and received an offer. Okay, it was for a summer position, but I'd be surprised if the processes differed significantly.

Unlike investment banking, technology, or some other divisions, very little technical knowledge is required before entering an Operations role. It is highly analytically intensive as it requires constant reassessment of existing techniques in a constant search for efficiency, but all of that requires knowledge of proprietary systems at work, information that the public cannot know. The ph

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I went through the Operations hiring process and received an offer. Okay, it was for a summer position, but I'd be surprised if the processes differed significantly.

Unlike investment banking, technology, or some other divisions, very little technical knowledge is required before entering an Operations role. It is very analytically intensive as it requires constant reassessment of existing techniques in a constant search for efficiency, but all of that requires knowledge of proprietary systems at work, information that the public cannot know. The phrases Goldman loves to pitch internally are economic architecture or industrialization, which is bankers' fancy language for "cutting costs." All divisions are consolidating, looking for that cost advantage that will put GS ahead of everyone else, and that's where Operations comes in.

What many people underestimate is how disorganized Goldman Sachs is as an organization. Before my summer internship, I always envisioned that the bank, famous for its efficiency and prowess as a company, would be managed in a militant way; slim, efficient and smart. What I encountered during my short two-month career was a lot of bureaucracy: operations doing compliance work, technology doing operations work, bankers doing things they're not supposed to do. The fact is simply that it is impossible to run a company of 30,000 people as a start-up company, and there will always be baggage. That said, it's the operations division's job to improve the company's bottom line;

Now to the interview itself:

It's a very classic fitting interview. Goldman asks some interesting questions and has a very nice interview style, so relax and be yourself. Think of it as an excuse to talk about yourself with two groups of people during two half-hour sessions.

Usually they will start the interview by telling you that they will take notes; It's a bit stressful watching them write a storm on your resume or in a notepad, so be prepared for that. They'll talk a bit about their background and then ask you to tell them something about yourself. This is the imperative question. I'm sure you already know, as you've likely been asked in the first round, but don't screw up this question. Chances are by the time you've finished your spiel about who you are, they've made the decision to hire.

They will also ask you Why Goldman? This should be the easiest question: I may be biased, but Goldman is the best investment bank, period. Nobody cares about the financing leaderboards (JP Morgan, BAML are higher) because Goldman doesn't have such a large balance sheet. Goldman is number one in mergers and acquisitions. Goldman offers the best advice, has the best talent, offers the best opportunities for advancement, has the greatest culture and the most efficient operation. I know I said earlier that it is bulky (and it is) but compared to other investment banks (with the exception of Morgan Stanley) it is a fighter jet. Just look at Citigroup (ouch!).

The Goldman culture was just amazing. I attend an Ivy League school and have never enjoyed such a culture of intellectual curiosity and stimulation. Ideas are not just sought out, but expected, and implementation / experimentation is welcome. CEOs will listen to summer interns if they have a good idea, and they are all flexible and willing to do whatever it takes for the company. Also, teamwork is paramount: I lost count of the number of people I worked with on a daily basis, solving problems and creating solutions.

There is also unmatched visibility for the elderly. I mean, you will need an appointment to speak with Lloyd Blankfein, but for most physicians, vice presidents, associates, and analysts, all you need to do is walk into their offices or make time for their calendar. If they are free, they will join you; during my time at GS I had a 100% response rate, everyone I contacted to meet. I met with CEOs on the income side, private equity professionals, hedge fund managers, and senior operating executives, among many others. Is awesome.

Diversity is also very orderly. I have never seen such a rich assembly of different people with different backgrounds, all contributing to the same projects. When you need to solve regulatory problems, you can reach out to that woman who worked at the Federal Reserve. When you need to work on a cross-border deal, call on that analyst who spent three years in Tokyo and knows your culture very well. Also, different people bring different perspectives, different points of view, and different ways of thinking. This means a wide range of different solutions, increasing the effectiveness of the operations division as a whole.

The expectation is that you will do work and that you will learn more than you have learned before. If you thought organic chemistry class was difficult, think again: the first few weeks will be a constant chaotic struggle to understand what is happening on earth. If you think you know anything about finances, you will find that you don't know shit and that all those hours in the classroom are wasted. Goldman Sachs teaches you everything with training unmatched in the investment banking world - they have offerings in all aspects of the business through the Goldman Sachs University platform, which consists of literally hundreds of presentations on topics and material in finance. corporations ranging from simple macroeconomics to CDS Indices and structured finance.

Also, all that nonsense that GS is not good to his customers, that's a lot of nonsense. I sat through a lot of bank calls, pricing calls, and listened to a lot of bankers talking to and about clients, and I didn't hear anything negative at all. Yes, it is sometimes frustrating when a client thinks they know more than you do (yes, not that the doctor you are arguing with has been doing this for 20 years or so), but all interactions were extremely courteous and professional. Just to emphasize professionalism with company culture: all instant messages / chat / emails are automatically checked for the slightest hint of profanity, and each instance will be reported to your supervising professional. If it is unprofessional or unethical, it is simply not tolerated.

I can do this all day and all night, although I will stop here. Everything I said above will probably be enough for a Why Goldman answer, hahaha.

They will ask you why operations? You should take the opportunity to express why the operations at Goldman; they simply treat it as part of the team. During my time at GS, I worked side by side with bankers, from analysts to CEOs and partners, just as respected and appreciated. We would work together to solve complex problems indoors, streamline operations, and make sure everything ran smoothly. When the bankers had problems, they would call us to ask us about any remedy we can dream of. The operations at Goldman Sachs are not the traditional "back-office" model that other banks seem to promote: the operations are very relevant. I think everyone realizes how talented the GS Operations team is and how extraordinary the work they have been doing is. especially in the face of the changing regulatory environment and economic uncertainty. There is no back-office environment here, you feel like you are part of Goldman Sachs.

In addition, the operations can be extended to be seen as a kind of "inside consulting": you are making Goldman Sachs a better company. By reducing costs, it enables GS to focus more resources on profitability, increase profitability for shareholders, and improve advice to clients.

Additionally, the Operations career path is incredibly diverse. I have seen CEOs who have worked in completely different divisions. Many senior Operations professionals have moved to the revenue side and then back (like Robin Vince, who is just a full boss). While this is less common on the revenue side (customer concerns, opportunity cost, etc.), Operations likes to take advantage of what they call cross-division synergies. They will take you out of a working system in PWM Operations to work on implementing a similar system in GSIP Operations, and they may ask you to implement everything across the entire IMD operations group. The opportunities are endless - you can choose a career where you learn a lot from everything. And the thing about Goldman is that once you think you're good at something, they'll 'throw you at something else. Constantly challenged. So when you talk to the Chiefs of Operations, they literally know everything about everything. It is part of the GS culture.

They will also ask you about ethics; I recommend that you prepare a propaganda about something you did that shows ethical values ​​and how you defended what is correct. I screwed up this question in my interview, but everyone has been faced with an ethical dilemma, no matter how small. Having integrity in your operations is paramount, as you will be able to detect errors and mitigate risk to the business. Therefore, this is an important consideration for the company.

They will also ask about teamwork and leadership. These are very important strengths at Goldman Sachs, so make sure you have excellent answers to traditional interview questions related to these topics. Also, prepare answers about strengths and weaknesses, etc. It's a traditional fit interview, and I'm sure you've prepared for that.

If you can talk about Goldman and all the things I've listed above, you'll get the deal. Be passionate and want Goldman above all else. They like that.

Disclosure: I was offered the opportunity to return to Operations at Goldman Sachs and I respectfully declined. That was definitely not because I didn't have an awesome experience, but because I'm a greedy Ivy League kid and I want a little exposure to investment banking and fell in love with private equity. I want, above any other firm, to go back to Goldman, and I am confident to say that I will reject offers from "more respected" buyout firms like Silver Lake and Blackstone in favor of Goldman Sachs. And I don't work for HR, even though it seems like I do.

I kept my identity anonymous because I don't want companies other than Goldman discounted from me. I am still looking for opportunities and will accept offers elsewhere if I am compelled to do so. Since the economy is in the bathroom, you may not have a choice.

Luck with everything! (Sorry for the incredibly long answer).

Disclaimer: This is 100% a junior investment banker's perspective, if that's not relevant to you then it probably won't help. I loved Goldman Sachs. Or ... at least I thought so. The first part of this story will seem like someone a little ... salty, about failing an interview, but ... listen to me. I remember my bachelor's degree at Brown University. I would attend all the Goldman Sachs briefings, do all the coffee meetings, and generally mark all the pre-steps to get an int ...

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Having worked at GS / Goldman for 3 years (at Equities IT), there are several factors that contribute to its reputation:
1) It has the best company culture (myths) of any investment bank I have ever seen. The KoolAid is really strong when you enter new employee orientation and some alumni still believe it. There is a culture of partnership that some still maintain from before the days of the IPO.
2) There is intense pride and camaraderie among Goldman alumni. Note that this is the only company I know of that calls former employees "alumni" and they have their own LinkedIn group that keeps everyone updated on

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Having worked at GS / Goldman for 3 years (at Equities IT), there are several factors that contribute to his reputation:
1) He has the best corporate culture (myths) of any investment bank I have ever seen. The KoolAid is really strong when you enter new employee orientation and some alumni still believe it. There is a culture of partnership that some still maintain from before the days of the IPO.
2) There is intense pride and camaraderie among Goldman alumni. Note that this is the only company I know of that calls former employees "alumni" and they have their own LinkedIn group that keeps everyone up to date on the latest news. When I talked to a fellow alumnus about the article "Why I left Goldman Sachs" and some points I agreed with, I was shot down. There is a lot of pride in many / most Goldman alumni that I have seen, even if they don't know who runs things in their department, etc.
3) One of my mentors in high school is a student and another is a good friend ... they are both extraordinarily smart and talented people and have extremely high ethical standards. This contributed to my sense prior to joining GS as an extremely rigorous place to work alongside superstars and geniuses from a plethora of high-level schools. La crème de la crème, so to speak.
4) Their in-house training program is pretty amazing, looking back. While I heard Marco Rubio speak at Barclays, I remember great hitters like Hillary Clinton, Colin Powell, MLK Jr., among others, speaking to packed internal audiences.
5) Your alumni (senior) have risen to high government positions, have served as Fed chairmen around the world, and have served on a large number of corporate boards and positions of responsibility. In fact, most of the students I encountered were assigned a higher-ranking position at other companies if they came directly from Goldman.
6) They had a reputation for being extremely hard-working, extremely competitive, and ruthlessly efficient (they implemented quartered to eliminate the bottom 5% and hired 5% to replace them). When our area went through layoffs in 2009, it seemed like every person laid off was the last person to arrive at the office in the morning (a bit of the passive-aggressive culture you might find in boasted hallways) and also those who work in the office. "less important" projects (as deemed by top management). For whatever reason, all the other big investment banks felt that their vocation was to copy / imitate what GS did and hopefully do better.
7) He was known for hiring young, ambitious, and attractive people. People put in long hours and the work-life balance leaned heavily in favor of work. People counted on each other to achieve crazy goals ... and they often did.

This is a generic answer and you can apply to any interview:

Remember that your goal is to always be the perfect candidate and that includes making sure you align your skills and qualities with the values ​​and needs of the company, and explaining what value you will add to the department or company.

  1. Challenges: I need a good and challenging environment to apply my skills and knowledge towards a competitive environment and prove my worth. So, I think this company would be the best platform to develop my knowledge and grow together with the company and meet the objectives of our company.
  2. If you are an intern, this may be an ans
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This is a generic answer and you can apply to any interview:

Remember that your goal is to always be the perfect candidate and that includes making sure you align your skills and qualities with the values ​​and needs of the company, and explaining what value you will add to the department or company.

  1. Challenges: I need a good and challenging environment to apply my skills and knowledge towards a competitive environment and prove my worth. So, I think this company would be the best platform to develop my knowledge and grow together with the company and meet the objectives of our company.
  2. If you are an intern, this may be an answer: I look forward to a platform that gives me the opportunity to apply everything I have learned from the last 4 years at my university. And I think your company is the best company to have my first work experience and I would learn a lot of new things as I am very excited to learn new things and have new experiences in my life.
  3. Align your skills and experience: Now, jot down a successful explanation: how your application (your knowledge, skills and experience) is a good match for your needs.
  4. Personal traits: your personal traits that could be most useful for your role. for example, you are a person and you can work with all kinds of people. so your entrepreneurial skill will be useful for work where a lot of coordination and collaboration is needed or your analytical skill for a research role ... please explain with an example how your skills helped to achieve the goals in the previous job .
  5. Cultural fit: You can personalize your responses by including details such as general core values ​​and company reputation. These can also include non-position related things like company community engagement, outreach programs, marketing campaigns, training programs ... anything you find about the company that excites and appeals to you.
  6. Motivating factors: It can also refer to incentive programs (such as politics), employee awards and / or management philosophies that motivate you. The idea here is that you are hinting at how well you fit into their corporate culture.

Key Secret: Most hiring managers want to recruit people who are genuinely interested in working with them ... happily!

Also, use the book 'Business Analysis: Questions and Answers' for your job interviews, clear your BA certifications and create BA deliverables at work as it provides information in the form of questions and answers.

Yes, the base at Goldman is pretty low if you are just starting out. While looking for my first job, I received 2 offers: one from Goldman and the other from Deloitte. Deloitte's offer was 50% more than what GS offered. I chose GS. I have since moved from Goldman Sachs, but joining GS was the best decision of my life. This is why:

  1. Don't worry about your salary, the year-end bonuses more than make up for it.
  2. As you may well know, once you partner with the GS brand, it stays with you for life and opens doors for you wherever you go. I'm sure GS knows it too, maybe one
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Yes, the base at Goldman is pretty low if you are just starting out. While looking for my first job, I received 2 offers: one from Goldman and the other from Deloitte. Deloitte's offer was 50% more than what GS offered. I chose GS. I have since moved from Goldman Sachs, but joining GS was the best decision of my life. This is why:

  1. Don't worry about your salary, the year-end bonuses more than make up for it.
  2. As you may well know, once you partner with the GS brand, it stays with you for life and opens doors for you wherever you go. I'm sure GS knows this too, perhaps one of the reasons the base is low.
  3. Professional progression in GS is incredibly fast. I know people who have been vice president in 5 years!
  4. The culture of work is intense, incredible and absolutely unforgiving. You will be working with incredibly talented and motivated people who are always trying to get ahead of you. This experience prepares you for life! One year around Goldman is equal to 2 anywhere else.

Yes, working at Goldman has its drawbacks. Relentless pressure and long hours because they don't have enough staff. But the experience is still worth it.

Hope this helps you make up your mind.

The level of experience required while working as an analyst is highly dependent on the group you are working with.
Since your question refers to the skills that are sought during recruitment, I am left with the same.

Generally, the skills the interviewer sees are:
(not just GS, but any company hiring for a quantitative analyst position)
1) Decent programming skills -
even if you are a data analyst and dream of using math to cool stuff, of course you would have to implement the same as a code for it to be useful and used in production. Therefore, generally the companies that contract data ana

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The level of experience required while working as an analyst is highly dependent on the group you are working with.
Since your question refers to the skills that are sought during recruitment, I am left with the same.

Generally the skills the interviewer sees are:
(not just GS, but any firm hiring for a quantitative analyst position)
1) Decent programming skills -
even if you are a data analyst and dream of using math for cool stuff Of course you would have to implement the same as code for it to be useful and used in production. Therefore, companies generally hire for data analyst positions
. A good knowledge of object-oriented programming and mastery of one of the basic languages ​​(C / C ++, JAVA) is generally expected.

2) Good problem solving skills:
Simple but innovative puzzles are usually part of the interview process.
Some resources that may be helpful:
Heard on the Street: Quantitative Questions from Wall Street Job Interviews
CSE Blog: Quantitative, Math, Computer Science Puzzles
Always helpful during interviews, if you are in the habit of solving puzzles , and especially if I've seen a similar puzzle before.

3) Soft skills
Aside from technical knowledge, it is always important (especially in terribly competitive environments) to correct a few little things.
For example:
no interviewer will start bombarding you with riddles, they will always ask you to introduce yourself. In such cases, it is generally a good idea to prepare a short 30-40 second introduction (not too long, you are not interested in your bio), which will highlight things about you that will be useful to the company.
Also, each interviewer will usually end up asking the candidate if they have any questions. It is always good to be prepared with 1-2 questions to ask the interviewer as it has an impact.

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