What do you think of changing jobs?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Roderick Serrano



What do you think of changing jobs?

Just as there is always the right school for the right child, there is always the right job for the right person.

I had two great jobs in my life, although I changed jobs many times in my life.

The first was to be a naval officer (B. Sc. In mechanical engineering), but I had to leave and resign my commission because it was beginning to interfere with my main goal in life (having a family) since I began to spend many months each year . far from home.

After moving various jobs (warehouse manager, contract manager, essential materials manager, customs broker, port and airport manager, administration manager, transportation company manager, freight forwarding manager, etc.), I finished As a project acquisitions manager, where everything I had ever done in my life work came to fruition. I ended up doing projects for the rest of my life and I really loved it. Although I changed jobs from engineering company to client, from copper to silver to gold mines, from a methanol plant to an acid plant, from Australia to Chile to Guyana to Israel and more, it met my expectations and I never worked in any. more all my life.

To answer your question, changing jobs can be challenging, but if you do, you will learn, grow, evolve, mature, and become more valuable as a person to any company looking for experienced people. On the other hand, as you change jobs, you will come to discover or find out which or which jobs you like the most and can do, rather than to earn more money, to enjoy what you work, instead of suffering from work, As many people end up doing when they get stuck and don't explore their options in life!

Job hunting is a big task. No one should lie to you saying that one day they woke up and got that professional job. It's stressful, and if you're cowardly, you could end up giving up the chase after all. There is another aspect of the job search that many of us don't know about.

And for those who do, they just don't know how to navigate through it.

Have you ever tried looking for work while employed at the same time? I mean trying to work out a deal elsewhere while you continue your current job. How I finish? Was it as smooth as you expected at first? Your r

Keep reading

Job hunting is a big task. No one should lie to you saying that one day they woke up and got that professional job. It's stressful, and if you're cowardly, you could end up giving up the chase after all. There is another aspect of the job search that many of us don't know about.

And for those who do, they just don't know how to navigate through it.

Have you ever tried looking for work while employed at the same time? I mean trying to work out a deal elsewhere while you continue your current job. How I finish? Was it as smooth as you expected at first? Did your resume get into the hands of a potential employer overnight and did you get a call the next morning?

Many people don't know how to handle this transition. I would recommend checking out some of Jolt's shifting courses to make the transition as seamless as possible. When a person gets a job and leaves another job, it is always a complicated matter during an interview.

One of the questions that many people hardly ever prepare for is why do they want to move from their current workplace? They are surprised that they end up ruining the entire interview. When an interviewer asks you why you left, they don't invite you to talk about the negative aspects of your previous job. No, they simply want to know why you want to join them.

Why are you thinking of changing jobs?

Two of the most common responses to this question can be:

  1. You have gained all the professional experience that your current job can offer you and naturally you want to improve / expand your experience.
  2. You may even start looking for a new job because there are no promotion prospects or more responsibilities vested in your current job.

While there are a number of ways to answer the job interview question 'why do you want to change your current job?', There are a few things a person should keep in mind when answering this question: One of the first things not to What to do is that under no circumstances should the person speak badly or say something negative about the company in which they previously worked, or even about some colleagues with whom they did not have a good time working.

This will not only give the interviewer a bad idea about you, but it will also give the impression that you are a regular complainer.

Organization: HCL Tech Noida

Designation: Senior Software Engineer

I joined like new in 3.25 LPA

First appraisal:

time: after 21 months (due to the 18 month deposit)

hike: 5%

rating: R1 (highest rating possible)

Second appraisal:

time: After 9 months

hike: 7%

Rating: R1 (highest rating possible)

Complaining about the low rise, software engineer Seior was promoted

Third evaluation discussion after 12 months between the Manager (M) and myself (E):

M: So E, you have performed well again and will get the same grade as before.

E: Sir, will it be the same walk too? It's been really low even after getting the

Keep reading

Organization: HCL Tech Noida

Designation: Senior Software Engineer

I joined like new in 3.25 LPA

First appraisal:

time: after 21 months (due to the 18 month deposit)

hike: 5%

rating: R1 (highest rating possible)

Second appraisal:

time: After 9 months

hike: 7%

Rating: R1 (highest rating possible)

Complaining about the low rise, software engineer Seior was promoted

Third evaluation discussion after 12 months between the Manager (M) and myself (E):

M: So E, you have performed well again and will get the same grade as before.

E: Sir, will it be the same walk too? It has been really low even after getting the best rating.

M: Look, the walk is not in my hands. But you got a promotion last year. And it is the first stage of your career. You should not focus on money.

E: Sir, it is 3 years and I am almost in the same package. Anyway, what happens on the site?

M: I can send you, but then I will have to give you a lower rating as a team member can only get 1 of the following: promotion, rating, hike, or on site.

E: Okay, so you can move me to a project that contains the new technology stack. This project contains a fairly old technology stack and I don't think it's good for me in the long run.

M: Look E, I have more experience than you. You must spend at least 5 years on a domain for you to be an expert.


After this discussion, the next day I resigned.

And the manager asked me why (yes, I still had the nerves or the shame to do it).

When they asked me under what conditions they could hold me. I listed the 4 conditions:

best project, 35% increase, 1 year on site and qualification.

They offered me everything except a best project.

I decided to part ways regardless of the offer.

Why?

One reason was to get a better tech stack out, but another was that after I quit, I was offered all 3 of these things. Which means I deserved those things. And that means that before I quit, they were depriving me of what I deserved!

Anonymous for obvious reasons.

There was no specific reason for several of them which I will list below to the best of my ability.

Job: Clinical Research Coordinator (clinical setting)

  • Expectations: I was told that my job responsibilities would range from being administrative to being in inpatient / outpatient clinic settings. Almost 90 percent of my day is spent in front of a computer doing what feels like endless data entry. I took this job to interact with patients, not to sit at a desk for most of my time while working.
  • Too challenging work - I have no medical history, but I do have a lot
Keep reading

Anonymous for obvious reasons.

There was no specific reason for several of them which I will list below to the best of my ability.

Job: Clinical Research Coordinator (clinical setting)

  • Expectations: I was told that my job responsibilities would range from being administrative to being in inpatient / outpatient clinic settings. Almost 90 percent of my day is spent in front of a computer doing what feels like endless data entry. I took this job to interact with patients, not to sit at a desk for most of my time while working.
  • Too challenging work - I have no medical history, but many of these studies were clinically heavy and well above my salary level. Some of the doctors he worked for expected him to go into patient rooms to see where a patient's "blood" was being secreted. I have no interest in touching people or examining anyone at all.
  • Lack of Staff: Our department was chronically understaffed. I was starting to forget about shit because I had 3-4 strict deadlines that were almost impossible to meet. This happened to me 3 or 4 different times, and I felt like if it kept happening, it would create bad blood. There was no other way to say it other than that shit isn't going to get done unless I stay until 6 to 7pm every day during work.
  • Not being willing to do OT without getting paid: the salary is the salary. I am not paid part time or anything extra for spending more time.

There were other reasons as well, but I got tired of putting up with nonsense and felt too pressured to do unrealistic tasks. I heard a quote earlier today that said "there is no reward for endurance" so in the end it wouldn't have mattered if I put in 60-80 hours a week, there was no light for me on the other side of this. .

Thanks for the A2A.
Many reasons:
1. Pay. Get a taller pack elsewhere, most grab it!

2. I am not happy with the current company.
Basically, for every employee, the equation with the company is synonymous with the equation with the manager. The more uncomfortable / dissatisfied you feel with your manager, the more bad you feel for the company and simply want to flee elsewhere.

3. Desire to work in a larger company.
The offer from a large company is tempting. It will produce greater respect from your peers, parents, etc. More on social esteem. Sometimes even salary incentives are overlooked for the sake of social esteem.

4.Onsi

Keep reading

Thanks for the A2A.
Many reasons:
1. Pay. Get a taller pack elsewhere, most grab it!

2. I am not happy with the current company.
Basically, for every employee, the equation with the company is synonymous with the equation with the manager. The more uncomfortable / dissatisfied you feel with your manager, the more bad you feel for the company and simply want to flee elsewhere.

3. Desire to work in a larger company.
The offer from a large company is tempting. It will produce greater respect from your peers, parents, etc. More on social esteem. Sometimes even salary incentives are overlooked for the sake of social esteem.

4.On-site opportunity.
The desire to go abroad. Earn in dollars or pounds. It seemed like a big deal in the Indian middle class. It will boost the marital CV.

5. Better job profile and more challenging job opportunities.
But this also has to go with fat paychecks. I have never met anyone who changes just out of passion for their job and not for monetary or other benefits.

Experimentation
Working in a startup sounds like an adventure for many (Note: most of the starups in India feel like they are the next facebook / google and now watsapp and attract engineers in a big way).
Switching to a completely different sector. One of my friends switched to the shipping industry, having worked hard for two years at an information technology company. He did it because he hated his job and just wanted to leave the industry.

Some even switch to their girlfriend's company. Just out of love and passion, this time, for the girlfriend. This is the most understandable of all decisions. :P


Happy change.

In 11 years of career, I currently work for the fifth company (excluding consulting / freelance work). I never plan or intend to change so many companies, but for every change there is a strong reason behind. It's never fun to change jobs, the whole process, attend interviews, notice period, join and prove yourself again in the new company.

  1. First company: It was a product company, it was incorporated like new and worked there for 3.7 years. But since I couldn't find a way to work on the last things, I decided to move on.
  2. Second company: it was a multinational, 1.7 years passed. I did not like the length of the big company
Keep reading

In 11 years of career, I currently work for the fifth company (excluding consulting / freelance work). I never plan or intend to change so many companies, but for every change there is a strong reason behind. It's never fun to change jobs, the whole process, attend interviews, notice period, join and prove yourself again in the new company.

  1. First company: It was a product company, it was incorporated like new and worked there for 3.7 years. But since I couldn't find a way to work on the last things, I decided to move on.
  2. Second company: it was a multinational, 1.7 years passed. I didn't like the lengthy processes of big companies for everything, and I was a bit stuck in one account, so I kept going.
  3. Third company: US-based company, small offshore development center in Bangalore, spent 2.7 years. Although the work was a bit hectic, I felt the culture was good. I definitely would have stayed a few more years, but for various reasons, they had to close the operations in Bangalore.
  4. Fourth company: a consulting function, the initial contract was for 11 months, at the end of the 11 months, it already had an offer from another country, so it did not request an extension.
  5. Fifth Company: The current company is located in New Zealand and was incorporated 1.9 years ago. I like the people, the culture and the job so I plan to stay as long as possible.

I always changed companies to explore more projects and improve skills, although money was the by-product, but it was never the reason for the initial step.

Most of the time when I quit, companies either match the new salary or try to offer more, but since my intention to leave was not the money, I was never left behind.

Image Credits: Photo by Marten Bjork on Unsplash

Decide first if you want your career to go anywhere. You may be perfectly happy doing what you do.

Society often suggests that if you don't move up the corporate ladder, you're a failure. That's silly. Many are the people who felt they "had" to go to management just to hate it, wishing they could go back to being a plumber / web developer / nurse / whatever.

If you want to go somewhere, then find out what your life allows you. I am a single parent. I could handle a minor change like a new company or a job related to what I currently do. But I couldn't become a surgeon. My children need me

Keep reading

Decide first if you want your career to go anywhere. You may be perfectly happy doing what you do.

Society often suggests that if you don't move up the corporate ladder, you're a failure. That's silly. Many are the people who felt they "had" to go to management just to hate it, wishing they could go back to being a plumber / web developer / nurse / whatever.

If you want to go somewhere, then find out what your life allows you. I am a single parent. I could handle a minor change like a new company or a job related to what I currently do. But I couldn't become a surgeon. My children need me to support them and they need my time. It is not reasonable for me to quit my job or go to school every night. Maybe you have external obligations, maybe you don't.

Now you know you want a change and you know what is feasible. At this point, find out what you want to do in life. Basically what you probably did when you were a young adult, but now you can do it with a lot of experience in the real world. You'll be better at it this time. You will learn to weigh the pros and cons of various jobs. Hell, you'll know what those pros and cons are a lot better than back then.

Once you've figured it out, do it. Good luck!

It depends on the reason for the job change because it will be asked in each interview. If you are simply doing it for money, please DO NOT. If you think that with each job change, you can get into a new kind of skill sets, a new challenge, you can learn more, then you might be fine. For the first 10 to 12 years, you can change jobs every 2 to 3 years (using the logic above). Post that (if you have reached the managerial level), then it is recommended to stay with a company as long as possible.

Also, don't count too much on service companies (if you work in IT). They are all the same with a fixed salary structure.

Keep reading

It depends on the reason for the job change because it will be asked in each interview. If you are simply doing it for money, please DO NOT. If you think that with each job change, you can get into a new kind of skill sets, a new challenge, you can learn more, then you might be fine. For the first 10 to 12 years, you can change jobs every 2 to 3 years (using the logic above). Post that (if you have reached the managerial level), then it is recommended to stay with a company as long as possible.

Also, don't count too much on service companies (if you work in IT). All are equal with fixed salary structure and experience. Also, the quality of the experience may not be good (most of the time). Always try to switch to product companies that (or could) give you a quality experience and great pay with other perks.

Always choose / check your role when changing companies. It is the most important thing, more than the brand of the company. Ask lots of questions about your role, position, team, job, future opportunities, etc.

Best of luck!!

You seem to have reached the point where I was a year ago :)

In short, you have created your comfort zone and are quite comfortable with it. But the real question is, what if you suddenly lose your job and find that your skills are totally out of date? Initially, he said he started looking elsewhere due to his financial needs. Did you talk to your boss about the possibility of an increase or increase in your salary, perhaps?

He also declares about his growth in his current company: do you have a clear idea of ​​the path you want to follow? What about your aspirations? What do you want now that

Keep reading

You seem to have reached the point where I was a year ago :)

In short, you have created your comfort zone and are quite comfortable with it. But the real question is, what if you suddenly lose your job and find that your skills are totally out of date? Initially, he said he started looking elsewhere due to his financial needs. Did you talk to your boss about the possibility of an increase or increase in your salary, perhaps?

He also declares about his growth in his current company: do you have a clear idea of ​​the path you want to follow? What about your aspirations? What do you want now that you have more than 10 years of C ++ experience?

I suggest that you get your answers to these questions. So the answer to your question will come very easily. If your boss denies you a walk or offers a very short walk and you are not interested in continuing there, it no longer makes sense to work at your current workplace.

On the other hand, if you get the expected walk and can pursue your own goals and the job is what you want it to be, then I don't see any reason to change jobs.

But remember: if you make a decision, stick with it. Take a lot of time to decide, it doesn't matter. But don't change your decision on a whim.

Only if you have a very, very good reason to change that has nothing to do with money. Otherwise, it is possible professional suicide.

As a general rule, in the third position you must have a long-term employment relationship of a minimum of 3 years to continue your career.

There is always the risk of getting a bad job or of being fired by your employer for external reasons. Missing an opportunity for no reason puts your career further in a lottery.

So let's say you leave now and the second job doesn't work. In the 3rd job you have no other options and you have to spend 3 years

Keep reading

Only if you have a very, very good reason to change that has nothing to do with money. Otherwise, it is possible professional suicide.

As a general rule, in the third position you must have a long-term employment relationship of a minimum of 3 years to continue your career.

There is always the risk of getting a bad job or of being fired by your employer for external reasons. Missing an opportunity for no reason puts your career further in a lottery.

So let's say you leave now and the second job doesn't work. In the third job he has no other options and has to spend 3 years even though he hates the job.

I am now retired.

But psychological research suggests that most people start looking for another job, even if their salary is competitive and they have good relationships with their colleagues, when their managers are:

  • Neanderthals; or
  • micromanaging your work; or
  • harass them regularly; or
  • waiting for them to cross some legal or ethical boundaries; or
  • refuse to listen Y.
  • taking credit for work that you or your team actually did (no recognition of subordinates' work)

In short, BAD BOSSES!

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.