What do people do after completing their PhD? Is it easy to get a job or become a faculty member? What are the other perspectives? I just finished a bachelor's degree and got a corporate job, but I would love to do a PhD at CSE.

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Louis Lowe



What do people do after completing their PhD? Is it easy to get a job or become a faculty member? What are the other perspectives? I just finished a bachelor's degree and got a corporate job, but I would love to do a PhD at CSE.

Answer: It is important that people know why they want to do a PhD. It is certainly not to collect a series of grades. As such, most of the people I know, myself included, did a PhD because we know the purpose of studying for a PhD. We did our PhD because we knew our career was in academia, teaching, researching, and advancing knowledge through our research, writing, and publishing. We also supervised research, master's and doctoral students with the aim of passing on our skills to future students who wanted to do what we did.

Yes, getting an academic job or a research job may not be easy t

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Answer: It is important that people know why they want to do a PhD. It is certainly not to collect a series of grades. As such, most of the people I know, myself included, did a PhD because we know the purpose of studying for a PhD. We did our PhD because we knew our career was in academia, teaching, researching, and advancing knowledge through our research, writing, and publishing. We also supervised research, master's and doctoral students with the aim of passing on our skills to future students who wanted to do what we did.

Yes, getting an academic job or research job may not be easy to come by in some countries where completion is very important, even if you have a PhD. Jobs aren't going to fall into your lap, but then life is competitive and it's up to you to make sure you stay competitive, getting work experience where you can, and being resourceful. How I will share my journey to earn my PhD below. It was by no means straightforward or easy, but with determination and planning, it will come sooner or later.

It is commendable that you have successfully completed your college degree and obtained a corporation. It is also recommended that you aspire to do a PhD at CSE. Keep this aspiration alive and do a PhD along the way. There is no rush, as I believe that learning is for life, and you can continue to improve your knowledge and qualifications in the future. However, you should be clear about the purpose of doing a PhD, and I think that after a few years in your corporate role, you will have a clearer idea of ​​why you want or don't want to do a PhD. You can thrive in your corporate role, get promoted and have a fulfilling life in your corporate role, and you may not want to do a Ph.D. Instead,

Sharing my own experience, I didn't even think about doing a PhD after my first bachelor's degree, and after further studies in education, I got a job in education and a few years later I started my own business. Only after gaining these work / business experiences, as well as some additional study while operating my business, did I become interested in research. He was a bit more mature and knew (why) he wanted to do a PhD, as he wanted to do research and teach at the university. I was also in a more financially secure position to do a PhD and won a scholarship to do so. I also got an academic position.

I want to share that in my case, I did not rush to do my PhD immediately after my undergraduate studies, but established myself in different ways: financially, getting the work / business experience, knowing that I enjoyed doing the research, knowing that I was ready. for business and teaching experience, and that the next phase of my working life was in academia. As such, it had a purpose for me to do a Ph.D., and the journey was easier for me, and perhaps I had enjoyed it more than I had pursued it right after my bachelor's degree.

I realize that my experience may not be applicable to everyone who is thinking of doing a PhD to emulate, but it nonetheless emphasizes the fact that one should (know why) want to do a PhD. So if you are sure of purpose, determined, and prepared to work diligently towards the goal, you will be successful in reaching your goal in life.

Yes, in fact, you need to think, plan for the longer term, be resourceful, be determined, rational, be willing to compromise, talk to people, take advantage of opportunities that come your way, and be prepared to take a little risk, to Sometimes even if you plan correctly and have resources, the risk will be low.

I hope this helps. Best wishes.

It is not a question. I try to address your concerns, one by one!

What do people do after completing their PhD?

Either they stay in the academy (postdoc, faculty member, etc.) or they start to find work!

Those who remain in academia are people who are generally passionate about science, research, and academic work! They LOVE what they do and see their future in universities and research centers!

Job seekers get bored of academia OR have a better offer outside of college!


Is it easy to get a job after a PhD?

Yes Yes:

  • you are an expert in you
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It is not a question. I try to address your concerns, one by one!

What do people do after completing their PhD?

Either they stay in the academy (postdoc, faculty member, etc.) or they start to find work!

Those who remain in academia are people who are generally passionate about science, research, and academic work! They LOVE what they do and see their future in universities and research centers!

Job seekers get bored of academia OR have a better offer outside of college!


Is it easy to get a job after a PhD?

Yes Yes:

  • You are an expert in your skills!

No Yes:

  • your skills have no value in the job market OR you are not an expert in any field.

Also, remember that a Ph.D. The title SOMETIMES makes you overqualified for some positions!


Is it easy to become a faculty member?

Yes Yes:

  • you have posts!
  • you have a good network (ex: other faculty members)!
  • You earn a reputation as a researcher!
  • You stay in the academy for a long time after your doctorate!

It is not an easy road and there is a lot of competition for faculty member positions!


I just finished a bachelor's degree and got a corporate job, but I would love to do a Ph.D. in CSE.

DO a PhD, if and only if when you have a clear idea of ​​why you are going to do it and what are your expectations about it?

If you want to become a faculty member in the future or are just passionate about research papers, the chances of you being successful are very high!

On the other hand, if you want to do a doctorate. Just for the sake of getting a degree, don't bother!

When people asked me what I was going to do after I finished my PhD, I used to jokingly tell them that I was going to stand on a corner and do tricks for a month to regain self-respect, then I was going to search for a job.

However, in all seriousness, it's not really easy, even in a STEM field. I have seen searches for information systems positions that have returned between 100 and 150 candidates. As my advisor used to say, what are the chances that I will float to the top of an applicant field like that, no matter how good I am?

It's not that bad either, especially if you're willing to give up R1 colleges and

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When people asked me what I was going to do after I finished my PhD, I used to jokingly tell them that I was going to stand on a corner and do tricks for a month to regain self-respect, then I was going to search for a job.

However, in all seriousness, it's not really easy, even in a STEM field. I have seen searches for information systems positions that have returned between 100 and 150 candidates. As my advisor used to say, what are the chances that I will float to the top of an applicant field like that, no matter how good I am?

It's not that bad either, especially if you're willing to give up R1 colleges and look at SLAC. You can also always go to the industry. Data analytics is a big deal now, with a great need for data savvy professionals.

I am a summary, it is a little difficult to find an academic job, but they are out there. Also, you can always enter the industry.

I remember driving through western Massachusetts for my interview at Williams College, coincidentally the radio was playing a George Carlin routine, with someone talking and talking about his dissertation and Carlin snaps, shut up now and bring me the menu.

To put it in perspective, I was 1 in 2 people in the world interviewing for perhaps the best job available in my field. Three years later I was left without studies.

Of course, my field has far fewer jobs than most others in academia, that being said, even in science, academic jobs are few and far between and the reality is that most people, if remain

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I remember driving through western Massachusetts for my interview at Williams College, coincidentally the radio was playing a George Carlin routine, with someone talking and talking about his dissertation and Carlin snaps, shut up now and bring me the menu.

To put it in perspective, I was 1 in 2 people in the world interviewing for perhaps the best job available in my field. Three years later I was left without studies.

Of course my field has far fewer jobs than most others in the academic field, that being said, even in the sciences, academic jobs are few and far between and the reality is that most people, if they remain in the field, they end up in a related area. industry (if any).

It depends on your own aspirations and the quality of the institution from which you finish your doctorate.

My feeling is that the PhD is a very long term commitment and for a UG it makes more sense to join MS / MTech and if interested convert to PhD after one year. This option exists in many places.

The quality of the institution and the supervisor is an extremely important criterion in creating a good PhD.

If you have good posts, then faculty jobs and industry jobs are available in good numbers, particularly in AI, ML, Networks, etc.

(1) Becoming a Prof. Assistant at nationally renowned institutions is NOT easy as vacancies are few, so there is substantial competition.

(2) It is a bit easy to become an Assistant. Prof. in pvt. institutions than in IIT / NIT / etc.

So either people opt for teaching positions at pvt. institutions or PDF (Postdoctoral Scholarship).

Former.

After PDF from reputed university / institution in India or abroad, most try option (1).

PS: If one has a PhD in Computer Science and is willing to work in business R&D, it is also possible. But most try option (1).

There is currently a surplus of PhD graduates seeking employment in colleges and universities. University administrations are taking advantage of this surplus by offering "contract" positions with very low salaries to hundreds of thousands of "adjunct" professors who work part-time. You will need employment in the industry just to make ends meet. At this point, I would advise against taking on a ton of student debt that you may never see returned in higher career income.

research in industry / government organizations or research in an academic institution. by far the two most common occupations. or maybe go to wall street, since you are in cs. Other than that, I'm not sure of the rest.

Here are some pros and cons from my personal experience (both doing the PhD and some results after doing it):

Pros

  1. The training you receive is unlike anything you can receive in the industry.
  2. A PhD is a status symbol and people will assume you are smarter / more sophisticated (particularly in the United States)
  3. You can take ownership of a small part of a discipline of your choice and add something new to it.
  4. You are likely to have more opportunities to travel (for example, go to conferences and workshops, present your work)
  5. You will meet other students who have a similar intellectual background.
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Here are some pros and cons from my personal experience (both doing the PhD and some results after doing it):

Pros

  1. The training you receive is unlike anything you can receive in the industry.
  2. A PhD is a status symbol and people will assume you are smarter / more sophisticated (particularly in the United States)
  3. You can take ownership of a small part of a discipline of your choice and add something new to it.
  4. You are likely to have more opportunities to travel (for example, go to conferences and workshops, present your work)
  5. You will meet other students who have similar intellectual ambitions.
  6. Developing your personal network
  7. You may have the opportunity to gain teaching experience (this is not relevant for everyone)

Cons

  1. The pay is lousy compared to almost any job in the industry, even if it is enough to live on. This is a bigger problem if you are married / living with someone / have children
  2. Besides 1, being in a PhD program can hurt your relationship prospects. You will need to make sure that anyone you are in a committed relationship with is aware of the workload and stress that you are experiencing. This is easier if your partner is also a PhD student / has completed a PhD.
  3. You will find that your quality of life is much lower than that of your college friends who got "normal jobs" afterwards. It can be toxic to your mental state to make comparisons between you and your old friends (see more about this in a related answer of mine)
  4. The workload is intense and almost always well over 40 hours.
  5. There are no established working hours. This isn't purely bad, but it comes with the feeling that you always need to be working, even maybe "especially" nights and weekends. You don't HAVE to spend every moment working, but this inherent lack of structure can be a mental burden.
  6. Any debt you have from previous degrees will continue to accrue interest, although you will hardly be able to work to pay off those loans while you are in school.
  7. The quality of advice you receive varies greatly, which is why making an informed decision about choosing an advisor is so important.
  8. I linked my answer to this question above, but also consider others' answers to: What is the biggest no-no when you are a PhD student?

** I often talk about my personal journey in grad school on my blog: People First, Math Second.

From credible institutions there is no difference in the resulting title. The difference is in the maturity of the student and the path he is taking.

For some, especially if they have some work experience, a direct PhD is fine. Of those who chose that route, for example in physics, where the expectation is usually to get a Ph.D., if it's not working, they may still end up with a master's degree. From a time perspective, a direct PhD if you define a dissertation topic early can be a bit quicker.

Doing a PhD after a Master's is quite common. You're in the mode of doing graduate work. If the teacher

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From credible institutions there is no difference in the resulting title. The difference is in the maturity of the student and the path he is taking.

For some, especially if they have some work experience, a direct PhD is fine. Of those who chose that route, for example in physics, where the expectation is usually to get a Ph.D., if it's not working, they may still end up with a master's degree. From a time perspective, a direct PhD if you define a dissertation topic early can be a bit quicker.

Doing a PhD after a Master's is quite common. You're in the mode of doing graduate work. If the master's degree is on the subject of the doctorate, you may be acclimated to the area, have a research advisor, etc. In that case, the additional time to obtain the PhD should be relatively quick, but adding the time for the Master and the Doctorate can still be a bit longer than some direct doctors. However, the probability of completion is probably the highest of the routes.

Doing a doctorate after doing a master's degree and working for a few years. It sounds good, and if you are focused on a particular topic, it can work well. Perhaps you can contribute more quickly to research, etc. However, you may have gotten used to being important, having a home and money from work, etc. This can make it difficult for people to adjust to student life. Plus, it takes a while to ignore those rusty math or other skills that you may have been slowly replacing while in the workplace with trivia about budgeting, the market, people management, etc.

In general, I would say there is no clear winner, but it depends on the individual and their motivations. The usual advice I give is that getting a master's degree in engineering is almost always a good thing financially, but to get a Ph.D. you really need to have a reason that is good for you. It can open some doors that a teacher can't, (that could be a good reason). It could be because science or engineering is a passion (another good reason). It could be for ego or prestige (I don't think that's a good reason, but it is important for some students).

There is a reason:

A Ph.D. will fill your head with knowledge you didn't have before. Actually, quite a bit of knowledge. For comparison, someone with just a bachelor's degree is likely to have less than 10% of the knowledge required for a PhD, and even less concentrated in a single area.

For a PhD to be worthwhile, that knowledge has to be valuable to exactly one person: YOU. If you don't find the knowledge you are gaining from your PhD valuable, then you are probably doing something wrong.

And emptor warning, because knowledge may be of no value to anyone else. That's why I may not get you a

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There is a reason:

A Ph.D. will fill your head with knowledge you didn't have before. Actually, quite a bit of knowledge. For comparison, someone with just a bachelor's degree is likely to have less than 10% of the knowledge required for a PhD, and even less concentrated in a single area.

For a PhD to be worthwhile, that knowledge has to be valuable to exactly one person: YOU. If you don't find the knowledge you are gaining from your PhD valuable, then you are probably doing something wrong.

And emptor warning, because knowledge may be of no value to anyone else. This is why you may not get a good job after graduation.

You should understand that the vast majority of jobs (both white-collar and blue-collar) don't require a lot of knowledge. Even bachelor's degrees are actually more of a formality for most jobs. So if very few jobs actually exploit undergraduate education, you can imagine that even fewer will take advantage of the knowledge of a PhD.

The workforce looks for things other than raw knowledge. They are looking for who will fit like a good cog in an already well oiled machine. And most jobs are also highly repetitive, even lucrative coding jobs, so the employer wants to know that you'll be fine doing the same thing over and over again, even if you don't use your mind much anymore.

Again, that's the majority of jobs. I didn't say they were good jobs. The truth is, good jobs are hard to come by and even harder to come by.

But you should keep in mind that almost all organizations have a pyramid structure. The jobs at the base of the pyramid are plentiful, but usually a little off-putting ...

Those bottom-of-the-pyramid jobs definitely won't benefit from the additional knowledge that a PhD would have. Also, you may be at a disadvantage when hiring for horrible bottom pyramid jobs, because many bosses don't like hiring people who are smarter and more educated than they are.

What about the top level of the pyramid? Well, there are two problems. First, there are considerably fewer jobs at the top of the pyramid, making the competition for those roles extremely fierce. Second, there is a significant amount of cronyism at the top of most pyramids - who you know becomes more important than what you know.

Basically, the corporate world is not ready for PhDs. The exception is when a company has a separate research division. If the research division is good, it will usually be somewhat separate from the normal pyramid hierarchy, allowing researchers to do a good job unimpeded by the stifling normal corporate culture.

Sadly, many companies aren't that progressive, because research only helps when you're trying to play a decade or two down the road. Or at least 5 years.

But given the way the stock market works, most publicly traded companies only think in the short term. What will drive your quarterly earnings and make them look more profitable to shareholders? This is the biggest problem with the publicly traded company system. Nobody cares about the future ...

That's why doctors have a hard time finding a place in the corporate world. Not that there are no positions, but there are far fewer assigned than there should be. And that's because the corporate world is pretty dumb.

But don't assume that everything is so optimistic for workers who don't consider themselves overqualified to join the corporate workforce. As you probably know, jobs at the base of the pyramid are increasingly being eliminated by automation.

Basically, the work system is already broken for everyone. Some people find it easier to see than others. But even for those in paid employment, the writing is on the wall ...

With the knowledge of a PhD, you have the ability to improve tomorrow.

But chances are, no one just hires you to do it. The world around you is resistant to change, and most of the companies that already exist are run by people who are not educated enough to even dream of the future.

Therefore, the only way to fully benefit from a PhD is to start your own business.

Starting a business is difficult and there are many reasons why a business can fail that have nothing to do with the strength of your ideas. The right idea marketed incorrectly doesn't work.

It's even more difficult to start a business when you don't have a lot of money saved before you start. And if you've been doing a PhD for 5-10 years, you probably won't.

However, the doctorate does not have an expiration date. Once you have acquired this knowledge, you can save it until you are ready to exploit it. The knowledge is there for you when you need it.

That's the way of looking at it. If you do a PhD, you are playing long term. Certainly, there is no guarantee that what you earn will have any economic value, and even less certain that someone would pay you directly for it.

But it is up to you to decide whether that knowledge will be useful to you in the future or not. If you want the knowledge, the PhD is a pretty good value, because where else are you going to get paid to sit and read books and papers all day?

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