What do I tell a hiring manager?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Prince Blevins



What do I tell a hiring manager?

Do not say anything.

Ask questions. Find out what your needs are. Listen carefully to the words you use. Ask him what his biggest problem is. And even ask what would be an ideal solution to your problem.

Now that he has told you everything, all his problems in his own words, you have all the weapons to persuade him that you are the only answer to his problems.

Tell him how you will solve his problems. And back it up with a test: how you have already solved this problem in the past, how you solved other similar problems. And if it's new, say: this is how I WOULD SOLVE your problem.

Also, very important

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Do not say anything.

Ask questions. Find out what your needs are. Listen carefully to the words you use. Ask him what his biggest problem is. And even ask what would be an ideal solution to your problem.

Now that he has told you everything, all his problems in his own words, you have all the weapons to persuade him that you are the only answer to his problems.

Tell him how you will solve his problems. And back it up with a test: how you have already solved this problem in the past, how you solved other similar problems. And if it's new, say: this is how I WOULD SOLVE your problem.

Also, very important, use the same words you used to describe your problem. Repeat them as needed. Show as much evidence as you can.

Show different types of evidence:

Mechanism as evidence (my character is such that I wake up at 5 in the morning and am tremendously productive and can work until 10 at night until the problem is solved)

Social proof - (others said this and this about me)

Scientific proof: (solving a problem in this way is proven by studies at Harvard), etc.

Certifications, stories, demos (bring a laptop and prove something), third party verifications (references), logical arguments.

Use a lot of specificity: where you worked, for how long, the name of the company, what they do.

This shows that he is not lying.

What I just described are million dollar marketing persuasion techniques used by billion dollar companies to sell investment advice and health supplements.

Use them yourself and you will be unstoppable.

Good luck.

A message / letter to the hiring manager is the first impression you make on your employer. Through your message, you are already "showing" your ability to communicate effectively and resourcefully. It is also very important that the content of your message is something that does not seem that all that matters to you is the job for you, but must also be considered with “what the employer earns” that hires you. Don't expect your hiring manager to read everything with enthusiasm, be direct and professional, avoid long and corny messages. Content-wise, this is what I think is the most important thing to keep in mind.

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A message / letter to the hiring manager is the first impression you make on your employer. Through your message, you are already "showing" your ability to communicate effectively and resourcefully. It is also very important that the content of your message is something that does not seem like all that matters to you is the job for you, but must also be considered with “what the employer earns” that hires you. Don't expect your hiring manager to read everything with enthusiasm, be direct and professional, avoid long and corny messages. In terms of content, this is what I think is most important for you to include:

1. Headline: It sounds obvious, but many underestimate the importance of getting this PERFECT. This is the part where you write the name of the company and the name of the official to whom you send the message / letter. Don't make the mistake of misspelling the company name or the hiring manager's name.
2. Greeting
3. Introductory paragraph: The hiring manager is as busy as the bee, he does not have all day to read your message / letter. HITCH with this paragraph. Show your enthusiasm for helping the company, if you can show evidence of how you can be of great help to the company, the better.
4. Follow-up Paragraph: After hooking the hiring manager in the Introduction, specify the current job responsibilities that make him a great asset to the company. Elaborate here your strengths, abilities and qualities. Show that you are currently doing what the business needs.
5. 3rd Paragraph: In this paragraph emphasize that you are together with the company in its current plans and long-term future growth, that with the skills and abilities you saw in the follow-up paragraph, YOU and the COMPANY are a perfect fit.
6. Closing Paragraph: State your intention to discuss matters in person. And you are open interview.
7. Formal closing

I hope that helps.

Good luck in your career.

Whatever you create will get you the job.

2 warnings.

Do not lie.

Do not say that you will do something that you cannot or do not want to do. (Think "What would I do for a Klondike Bar?")

More important is attitude.

Be polite.

Arrive on time.

Please and thank you, go far.

And always ALWAYS write a thank you note after an interview.

GOOD LUCK

First, I would clarify

Why? Because it shows that you can define the parameters of a problem before trying to solve it so that you don't end up solving the wrong problem.

I would ask the interviewer to define what it means to "move" a mountain.

  • If I pick up a stone on Mount Fuji and throw it, I have moved part of the mountain. That's enough?
  • Is there a minimum distance I have to move it or is it making it move enough?
  • A specific location that I have to move it to?
  • A time limit? This is particularly important. If there is no time limit, wait a year and it will have moved almost an inch due to the change.
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First, I would clarify

Why? Because it shows that you can define the parameters of a problem before trying to solve it so that you don't end up solving the wrong problem.

I would ask the interviewer to define what it means to "move" a mountain.

  • If I pick up a stone on Mount Fuji and throw it, I have moved part of the mountain. That's enough?
  • Is there a minimum distance I have to move it or is it making it move enough?
  • A specific location that I have to move it to?
  • A time limit? This is particularly important. If there is no time limit, wait a year and it will have moved almost an inch due to the shifting of the tectonic plates.
  • Does it have to stay in one piece? If I throw small pieces of Mount Fuji into a huge bucket one at a time, am I successful?
  • Do I have a budget?

Second, I would list facts about Mount Fuji

To solve a problem alone, I would do it in my head, but in an interview you want the interviewer to know what information you are using. That way, even if you make a false assumption, they know that you managed to use it well.

Most people will not know these things in their heads. However, some of them can be guessed.

  • Mount Fuji is approximately 4 kilometers high. (It's a mountain. You can guess it's tall. The exact height doesn't matter).
  • Mount Fuji has about 100 million tons. (Again, the exact weight doesn't matter)
  • It is located at the intersection of three tectonic plates! (Japan has a lot of earthquakes, so you would expect a lot of tectonic activity and fault lines. You may not guess that there are 3 directly below it, but you can safely assume that there are fault lines close enough to make it shake.)
  • It's a volcano! (I can't think of a good way to guess it, but it's also better known than any of the other facts)
  • Mount Fuji is famous (duh). It even has a religious significance in Japan. This is important because people will try to prevent you from moving it without proper permission. In fact, even with the authority to do so, people will protest.
  • It is close to the coast. (Japan is an island. EVERYTHING is relatively close to shore. Mount Fuji is particularly close, however.

Now I need to ask another question that I hadn't thought of before: under whose authority am I moving it? Does the public know?

Finally, I list some ideas along with pros and cons.

Giving just one solution to a problem like this would be useless. There are too many tradeoffs for a single solution to be strictly better than all the others.

  1. It is on or near the fault lines. I'm not a geologist so I don't know exactly how to go about it, but the faults are very unstable and could probably be triggered manually (with substantial effort).
    1. Pros
      1. Would definitely work
      2. It would probably keep costs down
    2. Cons
      1. You caused an earthquake! People will get hurt
      2. It won't move very far. Just shake.
  2. Make the volcano erupt. How? Two posibilities. Volcanic eruptions can be triggered by pouring the right amount of water into the volcano (but there is a sweet spot. Too much or too little and it won't work). They can also be triggered by a sudden drop in pressure. I would achieve this by creating a large sealed chamber at the top of the mountain, removing the air from it (it will have to be a very strong structure so as not to collapse on itself, but that is feasible), placing it directly on the top of the volcano (forming a hermetic seal with the edge of the volcano) and making an opening. The air rushing to fill the empty space will carry the magma with it, causing a self-sustaining eruption for a short time (until the pressure inside the volcano returns to equilibrium due to the loss of magma).
    1. Advantages of the water method
      1. Water is available as the coast is close
      2. Relatively low cost for what we want to do
    2. Cons of the water method
      1. It takes a lot of water and we have to move that water way up, which means it takes a lot of energy. It is inexpensive for the task, but still very expensive.
      2. You made a volcano eruption. People will get hurt.
      3. The whole process must be automated because anyone on top of the mountain would die.
      4. The mountain will only shake a little.
    3. Advantages of the pressure method
      1. Probably cheaper than the water method and easier to automate.
    4. Cons of the pressure method
      1. Still needs to be automated
      2. Keep causing a volcanic eruption
      3. And the mountain still only shakes a little
  3. Dig a canal along the side of the mountain. Widening the channel until it reaches the mountain and then narrowing it. This will cause the water to move faster over the mountain and erode it faster. Eventually, it erodes the base of the mountain enough that the mountain falls off.
    1. Pros
      1. Relatively cheap
      2. It will not necessarily cause a natural disaster.
      3. It moves it further than just shaking it. In fact, the peak will move about 4 miles.
    2. Cons
      1. It will probably cause a natural disaster. (You eventually hit the magma).
      2. It takes an incredibly long time
      3. The mountain cannot be moved anywhere.
      4. Effectively destroy the mountain.
  4. Break the mountain piece by piece and send it somewhere by train.
    1. Pros
      1. You can move it wherever you want
      2. It will not necessarily cause a natural disaster (if you are very careful with magma)
    2. Cons
      1. They are 100 million tons. The cost of moving coal by rail (compared to coal because it is also a rock) is, at its lowest level, $ 10 per ton per mile. Ignoring the tremendous costs of breaking down the mountain, it still costs a billion dollars per mile to move it.
      2. Unavoidable public outrage.
      3. Good chance of accidentally hitting the magma. At best, it is a very dangerous job. The worst is a natural disaster.

Do I get the job?

The RR interview question. It may feel like you are being compared to other candidates, but it is. I always feel like this question implies a list of my qualities that the interviewer wants me to talk about, and THAT makes the situation really uncomfortable! The interviewer's job is to hire the best person for the position. Most candidates who make it to the interview stage are qualified for the position. The winning candidate must be more than qualified, especially in a very competitive job market.

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The RR interview question. It may feel like you are being compared to other candidates, but it is. I always feel like this question implies a list of my qualities that the interviewer wants me to talk about, and THAT makes the situation really uncomfortable! The interviewer's job is to hire the best person for the position. Most candidates who make it to the interview stage are qualified for the position. The winning candidate must be more than qualified, especially in a very competitive job market. Each hiring is a risk for the company. Your interviewer will also take a personal career risk in recommending a particular candidate for hire. If the candidate performs well, Mr.

With this question, your interviewer is asking you to sell yourself and your state as the best person for the position. Make your job easier by convincing them that:

  • You can get the job done and deliver exceptional results
  • You will fit in wonderfully and be a great addition to the team.
  • You have a combination of skills that make you stand out from the crowd.
  • Hiring you will make her look smart and make her life easier

How to answer: Why should we hire you?

Possible answer 1:

“This is a wonderful opportunity for me to be interviewed at such a renowned company. Your organization will surely prove to be an excellent platform for me to establish my skills and knowledge in the business world. Although I am a fresher person, I assure you that I will do my best and work with my full potential to be able to contribute as much as I can to the growth and well-being of this great brand ”.

Possible answer 2:

“Honestly, I have all the skills and experience that you are looking for. I'm pretty sure I'm the best candidate for this job. I am a self-motivated person and I try to exceed my superior's expectations with high quality work. Being a fast learner, I quickly acquire business knowledge related to my project. Lastly, I would like to add that I work well as an individual contributor and also as a team member. Taken together, all of these skills together make me a complete package for this job. "

Possible answer 3:

“I feel like I should be hired by you given my excellent education and skills. I have your attitude to stand out. Given the opportunity, I will surely work to develop my expertise, which would be beneficial to me and your organization. "

Your 2-3 vignettes could include a combination of the following:

  • Technical skills
  • Soft skills
  • Key achievements
  • Awards / recognitions
  • Education / training

So there you are! All of these sample answers will come in handy when you are faced with this difficult interview question "Why should I hire you?" Convert your response into a confident 2-minute speech. The idea is to practice, rehearse and investigate. Do a thorough research on the company beforehand, read your job description well, and fight your way through the big day! All the best.

First, let me clarify this: I have been recruiting for over twenty years and hired thousands of people. PLEASE STOP ASKING THIS QUESTION.

There. Thanks.

There are a few reasons why this question is asked:

  1. Tradition. The interviewer heard someone else ask, so now they ask.
  2. Can. This open-ended question allows the candidate to give an honest answer ("Honestly, it's close to home and I need the money") and then use it as an excuse not to hire the person. Even a slightly less honest answer can be misrepresented by an employer to match their biases and be the cause of the rejection.
  3. Reaffirm
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First, let me clarify this: I have been recruiting for over twenty years and hired thousands of people. PLEASE STOP ASKING THIS QUESTION.

There. Thanks.

There are a few reasons why this question is asked:

  1. Tradition. The interviewer heard someone else ask, so now they ask.
  2. Can. This open-ended question allows the candidate to give an honest answer ("Honestly, it's close to home and I need the money") and then use it as an excuse not to hire the person. Even a slightly less honest answer can be misrepresented by an employer to match their biases and be the cause of the rejection.
  3. Reaffirmation. Employers like to hear why they are so good and why the world is crying out to work for them. This is not a great reason, but it may be part of it.
  4. Motivations We want the candidate's motivations to match our trajectory. If there is a discrepancy here, everyone should want to know.

Number four is the "real" reason that everyone will give you.

So why should you stop asking this question?

First, because you have no earthly way of ensuring that the answer the candidate is giving you is the truth. IN FACT, the answer they are giving you is most likely true, but highly infected with the candidate's projection of what they think you want to hear. The answer can be easily rehearsed and the actual (assumed) information you get from the answer is not really very reliable.

The second reason you shouldn't ask this is that the candidate really has no idea how bad or good it will REALLY be to work for you, in this company, with this team, your tools and politics, your pressures, etc. We can wait. We can guess, but until you've been working there for a few months, you really won't have a clue.

Third, if I turn the question around, it might be clear: "Why, hiring manager, do you want to hire Bob Smith?" You met him 30 minutes ago. You read his resume. He told you fifteen things about himself in this interview, why this candidate? Why is he the one? Why do you want it?

At the end of the day, you have only the most tenuous information to go on, and it is premature for you to express your deepest wishes and enthusiasm towards this candidate.

It is the best job you can do to allow a candidate to get information about your job, your company; They really DON'T HAVE ANY IDEA as to whether they really want your job until they do.

The real answer is a combination of "It seems like a fair exchange of money for my work" and "It seems more interesting than not."

Any other answer is suspicious. Take the time to help the candidate understand what's in it for him; it will be time better spent.

Will always trumps skill.

I always divide the interview process into 3 parts.

Part one: red flags

This is very important to me, if I can find any in the first 5 to 10 minutes, I reject the candidate. What are the red flags in my opinion that are not relevant to this question?

Part Two - Self Awareness

Starting with the basics, does the candidate know their strengths and areas of opportunity? Does it match what is mentioned in the resume? I ask him about recent achievements (not necessarily related to the position he is applying for). This is where I look, I try to get answers for the following questions

  • I
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Will always trumps skill.

I always divide the interview process into 3 parts.

Part one: red flags

This is very important to me, if I can find any in the first 5 to 10 minutes, I reject the candidate. What are the red flags in my opinion that are not relevant to this question?

Part Two - Self Awareness

Starting with the basics, does the candidate know their strengths and areas of opportunity? Does it match what is mentioned in the resume? I ask him about recent achievements (not necessarily related to the position he is applying for). This is where I look, I try to get answers for the following questions

  • Are you really passionate when you talk about what you think of as 'achievements'?
  • I look for examples of strengths, why do you consider that quality as a strength? How have you helped the candidate? Again I try to connect this to the resume
  • What is your area of ​​opportunity, does the candidate even know? Is it too generic? How long have you known? What is being done to overcome it?
  • The devil is in the details, I often interrupt the candidate on purpose and push for more details from the examples they are sharing.

I probe and press until I am convinced and understand what drives the person. If I'm not convinced that I rule out hypothetical situations and try to get answers, this works 9 times out of 10. If I feel, even remotely, that the candidate is being casual in answering these hypothetical questions or has been casual in the past, I reject the candidate. Interviewers don't ask questions about topics that are not relevant or important, no matter how silly or stupid it may sound. Most likely it is a psychometric question to assess your attitude.

If I am convinced so far of the interview, I contract it. This part usually takes between 15 and 20 minutes.

Part three: adding value

I go into this part of the interview with very few candidates. This is more of a discussion that I have with the candidates that I call 'Must Hires'. I talk to you in detail about what we do as a Team and how it adds value to the Organization.

If I see the hunger in the candidate's eyes to be part of my team, I make sure to hire them even if I have to stretch the budget a bit.

If I have to summarize it, know what's on your resume and base your examples on it (self-awareness). Don't lie, if you don't know something, say no, honesty is always appreciated. Do not be casual and be well prepared, if you are naturally fit for the job / position you are applying for, it is a great advantage.

You will only be hired if the interview panel recognizes that you can add value to the job they hire you, show them that.

When asked 'Why do you want to work for the company?', You have many options on how to approach the question, but they all stem from the baseline of knowing who you are, what you want to do, and how that fits with the company. asking the question.

You can answer by focusing on
1) the skills you can and want to use and develop and for what purpose
2) the relevance to your career path and where you could make a contribution in the next year or two (or 5)
3) elements of the job or team that you will enjoy and as a result beleve will keep you motivated and engaged to make a contribution
4) Aspects or

Keep reading

When asked 'Why do you want to work for the company?', You have many options on how to approach the question, but they all stem from the baseline of knowing who you are, what you want to do, and how that fits with the company. asking the question.

You can answer by focusing on
1) the skills you can and want to use and develop and for what purpose
2) the relevance to your career path and where you could make a contribution in the next year or two (or 5)
3) elements of the job or team that you will enjoy and as a result beleve will keep you motivated and engaged to make a contribution
4) Aspects of the company itself, including the culture, philosophy, mission and why they have value to you and as a result will help you to invest and stay engaged and will help maintain that culture.

To prepare to answer this question, you need to assess and understand:
1) what skills you have and want to use
2) what kind of work environment you
excel in, 3) what is important to you in an organization, leadership, and your colleagues
4 ) what contributions you can see yourself making.

Then you need to do your research and do some homework on the company and its industry so that you can find the items that fit.

While this may seem like a lot of work, it is critical to managing your career anyway and once you have these basics you can apply them to your career and use them in many interviews.

The best way to answer "why do you want to work for us?" It is about showing the organization that you know who you are, what you want to do and how that fits into the job and the organization and will allow you to fit in and make a contribution. .

AND . . . If the company or job is just a job or company and you don't have a particular passion for the job or company, find out what benefit the experience will bring you, including learning and skills development, gaining experience and meeting. with colleagues. There is always some benefit to be gained from an experience if you seek it out. Even a survival job offers opportunities. Don't belittle interviewers by degrading the job or company. Focus on what you can earn and connect it with what you can offer.

So put yourself in the role of hiring manager. You have a stack of resumes, maybe it's a small stack of just 20 or 30 for a position that was posted a week ago. How many of those people do you want to spend 5 minutes on the phone with to assure them that yes, you have their resume, no, we are not sure when we will start inviting people to an interview? no, we do not need any additional information; and any other pretexts they have decided to use to justify their call? Twenty calls of this type will consume a few hours of your time; Thirty will lose another hour.

What if they have

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So put yourself in the role of hiring manager. You have a stack of resumes, maybe it's a small stack of just 20 or 30 for a position that was posted a week ago. How many of those people do you want to spend 5 minutes on the phone with to assure them that yes, you have their resume, no, we are not sure when we will start inviting people to an interview? no, we do not need any additional information; and any other pretexts they have decided to use to justify their call? Twenty calls of this type will consume a few hours of your time; Thirty will lose another hour.

What if they have more than one position open? Or what if they got a hundred resumes and not just a few dozen?

Unless there is something to indicate that a call will be welcome, don't do it. I hated getting repeat calls and emails from candidates because I had a lot of work that had nothing to do with filling a vacant position. Calling and emailing about something that was not legitimately important showed a lack of respect for my time and my work. I tried not to let it influence me negatively, but it certainly didn't make a positive impression.

What should you say

You want to accomplish 2 things here: first, get them to open the email, and second, get them to reply. You can't control whether they are interested in you or not, so don't worry about that just yet.

The subject line is key. One of the ones I like to use includes the person's name in the subject line (they have a 30% increase in click / open rate). I also like to use the word "referral" there: referral, quality control engineer.

In the body of the message, keep it very short. No more than 500 to 600 characters. The first sentence should tell them all about who you are and why you are emailing them:

"Hello, hiring manager

Keep reading

What should you say

You want to accomplish 2 things here: first, get them to open the email, and second, get them to reply. You can't control whether they are interested in you or not, so don't worry about that just yet.

The subject line is key. One of the ones I like to use includes the person's name in the subject line (they have a 30% increase in click / open rate). I also like to use the word "referral" there: referral, quality control engineer.

In the body of the message, keep it very short. No more than 500 to 600 characters. The first sentence should tell them all about who you are and why you are emailing them:

"Hello, hiring manager,

I am a QA Engineer with 5 years of experience in agile environments with a Bachelor's degree. I would like to work for CompanyName. "

You don't have to attach your resume, but include a LinkedIn link at the very least so they can see who you are.

Always, always, always include your phone number at the bottom of your email signature:

"Sincerely,

Jacob

555-2424 "

Answer: As I have just started my career, I have no practical achievements, but I really want to explore and experience in a practical way my potential by providing the best services to the company. It will be an honor for me to work with you and with this organization.

The primary goal of any organization when hiring employees is their loyalty and hard-working nature. I am loyal and hard-working since my childhood; At my school and colleges, I was one of the dedicated group of students who had been completing homework or assignment on time. For these excellent qualities, I was recognized many times during

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Answer: As I have just started my career, I have no practical achievements, but I really want to explore and experience in a practical way my potential by providing the best services to the company. It will be an honor for me to work with you and with this organization.

The primary goal of any organization while hiring employees is their loyalty and hardworking nature. I am loyal and hardworking since my childhood – in my school and colleges, I was one among the dedicated set of students who had been completing the task or assignment on time. For these excellent qualities, I got appreciation many time during those periods.

I am the best fit for this job profile, due to my outstanding programming (C, C++, C#, HTML, and .Net), networking, analytical and problem solving skills. Also, I have practical experience in many Operating Systems.

First, don't be put off by this question. I have seen many HR companies use this as a tactic, mentioning the many applicants they are considering, when the reality is that they have none. What the employer wants is for you to answer the question that you currently cannot. Why should they hire you?

Here's a mad libs script, edit it however you like.

"While I am not aware of the skills of the other candidates you are considering, I believe that my ability at _____ will benefit you at _______."

Follow up with a good example of how you've accomplished that goal. If you've done your research, you can try:

"I see you

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First, don't be put off by this question. I have seen many HR companies use this as a tactic, mentioning the many applicants they are considering, when the reality is that they have none. What the employer wants is for you to answer the question that you currently cannot. Why should they hire you?

Here's a mad libs script, edit it however you like.

"While I am not aware of the skills of the other candidates you are considering, I believe that my ability at _____ will benefit you at _______."

Follow up with a good example of how you've accomplished that goal. If you've done your research, you can try:

“I see that you need _______, and in my experience doing _________ I was able to achieve _________ for a recent employer. "

If you’ve really dug in, maybe speak to their core values as well. And show how you can align with them, and help them accomplish their goals.

It’s a vague answer because the interviewer is asking a vague question.

Other Guides:


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