What do I need to know about job hunting with recruiters?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Taylor Kirk



What do I need to know about job hunting with recruiters?

What do I need to know about job hunting with recruiters?

What you really need to know is that recruiters do not work for you. Recruiters work for their hiring managers. This is true for all recruiters, be it an internal / corporate recruiter like myself or an external / agency recruiter.

Do yourself a favor and remember this when working with a recruiter.

The old saying that this world is about who you know ... is true.

Sometimes who you know is more valuable than what you know. That means you may have or possess all the right skills, but not know the right people. When this is the case ...

Guess what?

You won't get the job.

Surprised?

Get to know as many recruiters as possible during your career search and see how your chances improve.

I wouldn't just trust someone you know. In addition to softening up on recruiters, I would search job boards for keywords and skills that are needed.

What's interesting about all of these recruiter responses is the assumption that the candidate is being "unprofessional" and is trying to take the recruiter's fee away. I fully understand that if an organization has hired a recruiter in the first place, they have already set their sights on recruiting through that route, and fee evasion (if possible in the long run) is not a priority, and therefore In and of itself, it is not worth the risk of upsetting the recruiter.

That being said, I have a recruiter who approached me about a position, he had a phone call with me to guide me through the position.

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What's interesting about all of these recruiter responses is the assumption that the candidate is being "unprofessional" and is trying to take the recruiter's fee away. I fully understand that if an organization has hired a recruiter in the first place, they have already set their sights on recruiting through that route, and fee evasion (if possible in the long run) is not a priority, and therefore In and of itself, it is not worth the risk of upsetting the recruiter.

That said, I have a recruiter who approached me about a position, had a phone call with me to walk me through the job profile, received my CV, was even more interested in a good fit, and asked to set up a follow-up. -You can call me to guide the recruiter through my CV and positioning for the client. The recruiter did not show up for the scheduled appointment, he emailed me 10 minutes late to tell me he was having a hectic day, could you call me tomorrow afternoon? The next day, there is no call. Now who is being "unprofessional"? I am in good judgment to reach out to the hiring manager directly via LinkedIn to tell him, look, pay these yahoos if you want; of course, they deserve credit for making us aware of each other.

Similarly, recruiters approached me repeatedly that they were very excited about me as an ideal candidate, but dropped out of line as soon as they learned that I would require a work visa extension, which automatically sets a 4-week turnaround time and some title. risk in hiring. I fully believe that the clients in these cases never saw my CV. The recruiter had done what the client hired him to do (found an ideal candidate for the position), but withheld my CV so as not to outshine other less-qualified candidates who would nonetheless result in faster and easier hiring and the recruiter will be paid more. quickly.

Let's face it folks - recruiters work for themselves and are paid by the hiring manager when hiring is done. That everything is fine and well; when it works properly, recruiters are helpful and efficient in the job market. But make no mistake, it is a numbers game; roles and recruits are simply earned for them. When the recruiter is unprofessional, incompetent, or clearly puts his own interests above the hiring manager, I think it's okay to step in and "ease" things a bit so that the client has a fair chance on the best candidate. Don't worry, recruiters. They will still pay you. The worst that could happen is being exposed as unprofessional and / or incompetent, and for putting your own interest before that of your client. And in my opinion that's a good thing. For the customer's sake ... and yours.

The three types of recruitment companies are as follows;

An internal recruiter is a person who works as a recruiter within a specific company and is trying to find candidates specifically for that company. This type of recruiter will probably not be specialized and will be responsible for many different recruiting sectors. An example could be an internal recruiter who is responsible for all financial roles, all sales roles, and support staff.

This type of recruiter will not make or have the power to make decisions about which candidates to hire, however, depending on your personal experience, it can be a problem.

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The three types of recruitment companies are as follows;

An internal recruiter is a person who works as a recruiter within a specific company and is trying to find candidates specifically for that company. This type of recruiter will probably not be specialized and will be responsible for many different recruiting sectors. An example could be an internal recruiter who is responsible for all financial roles, all sales roles, and support staff.

This type of recruiter will not make or have the power to make decisions about which candidates to hire, however, depending on your personal experience, they may be able to provide you with advice. Since companies do not need to pay commissions to internal recruiters as their salary is paid by the company, there may be a better chance of landing a job through an internal recruiter rather than using external recruitment companies who will search for the perfect candidate for their job. customer. These recruiters may be involved in other HR functions such as talent management or internal HR policies, however their main job will be internal recruiting.

Contingent Recruitment Companies are a bit different in that they are external recruiters who are hired by a company to find the perfect candidate for a specific position, either because the company does not have the time or internal resources to complete the search on its own. themselves. Contingent recruiters work on “pay per candidate who find a new job” (that is, they have to find the perfect candidate and get the client to hire this candidate before they get paid). This generally means that they are faster, more aggressive in their methods, and unless you are the right candidate for them, they have less time for you.

Contingent recruitment companies can deal with both mass recruitment and a graduate recruitment program, when they will try to get 100 new graduates from all over Europe to join a company after they have left university or intermediate and senior recruitment for a series of different sectors from their traditional Finance and Accounting and Sales and Marketing sectors to specific sectors such as Media and Manufacturing.

Usually contingent recruiting companies are not involved in C-Level (CEO, CFO, COO) or Top Management (IPO Advisers, Executive advisor) roles as they are very specific and require a separate knowledge bank. These types of roles will be left to retained recruiters or executive search consultants.

Retained hiring companies are often hired by a company to find a very specific candidate for a very specific position, such as its new CEO. This type of recruiter will generally be paid a higher fee as it can take up to a year to find the right candidate and this fee will be paid in stages, with 30% payment up front and 40% after the second round. Of interviews. and the final 30% after the candidate has passed his probationary period. Fees for the best candidates can exceed $ 100,000.

Retained recruiting firms or executive search consultants will work directly with clients and find an exact match to the client's needs. The positions they will work in tend to be in senior management, such as CEO, CFO, COO, or perhaps a CEO role. The consultant will normally work with the company for a long period of time and will be responsible for all senior staff recruitment.

One of the main disadvantages of working with a retained recruiter or executive search consultant is that due to the complexity of the role and that the process can take a long period of time, most consultants will not have many ongoing projects and Therefore, if you are not suitable for a position, you will not receive another call for a long period of time. You also need to meet several executive search consultants so that your CV is available and therefore you have a good chance of finding a new position or you could also watch some serious stock market documentaries.

Nick - www.careeradviceguy.com

Unemployment has become a major problem today. Apart from this, many of those who are employed work at much lower pay. Because of this, everyone has an urge to get a new job that meets their demands. Hence, platforms like naukri.com, LinkedIn, and many others have become major players who never need to think about demand. They don't have a specific season. Every day is a season for them. So people end up looking for work on these sites. Here are some common mistakes people make: ...

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How to tell a recruiter / 'headhunter' that you no longer want to work with them.

Could you say (by email) ………………. “I appreciate your efforts on my behalf, but at this time there are some other options that I am going to consider. Therefore, please do not send my resume to any other potential employer at this time.

Again, thanks for your help.

Sincerely…."

If you don't specifically tell them not to submit your resume, they can still do so and it could conflict with your own efforts.

You don't want to burn bridges with anyone during a job search, even recruiters who haven't found a job.

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How to tell a recruiter / 'headhunter' that you no longer want to work with them.

Could you say (by email) ………………. “I appreciate your efforts on my behalf, but at this time there are some other options that I am going to consider. Therefore, please do not send my resume to any other potential employer at this time.

Again, thanks for your help.

Sincerely…."

If you don't specifically tell them not to submit your resume, they can still do so and it could conflict with your own efforts.

You don't want to burn bridges with anyone during a job search, even recruiters who have not presented any potential employment opportunities.

There is no reason to mention the references as you will no longer be nominated.

This happens all the time. No one is going to be offended. Everything continues as usual.

Make sure each major job board contacts you when they have jobs that may match your preferences. It is an automatic service and goes by job. So, don't stop looking at job boards yourself. Select the top employers in your area and scan their websites daily for job openings. Make sure your resume meets the requirements for whatever job you can find. Adapt it to whatever job offer you are responding to.

Good luck with your search.

Cover letters are overrated. It's common advice to use the cover letter to position yourself for the job by mapping your skills into the job requirements. In fact, very few hiring managers see the cover letter, let alone read it. It is discarded early in the selection process. The cover letter should state that you are providing your resume to be considered for the xyz job opportunity. Let the resume do the rest. Of course, this means that the resume must be tailored to the specific job opportunity and that is something that is not commonly done.

Other advice than me

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Cover letters are overrated. It's common advice to use the cover letter to position yourself for the job by mapping your skills into the job requirements. In fact, very few hiring managers see the cover letter, let alone read it. It is discarded early in the selection process. The cover letter should state that you are providing your resume to be considered for the xyz job opportunity. Let the resume do the rest. Of course, this means that the resume must be tailored to the specific job opportunity and that is something that is not commonly done.

Another tip that is useless is to provide letters of recommendation in writing. These are not worth the paper they are printed on. Also, if they are provided along with the resume, you will look desperate. It is far better to provide contact information for key references when asked for references.

As Iris has already said, yes and no, but I would NOT do both as that can cause potential confusion and conflict. My suggestion is to look at the company's LinkedIn page to see how serious they are about direct hiring resources and if they have dedicated internal recruiters. If so, you should be confident that internal processes will work and your CV will be reviewed by the right person. If the answer is "no", it is very likely that someone who does not understand your skills and competencies will be able to review your CV and simply get lost. A recruiter can put their CV in front of the platform

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As Iris has already said, yes and no, but I would NOT do both as that can cause potential confusion and conflict. My suggestion is to look at the company's LinkedIn page to see how serious they are about direct hiring resources and if they have dedicated internal recruiters. If so, you should be confident that internal processes will work and your CV will be reviewed by the right person. If the answer is "no", it is very likely that someone who does not understand your skills and competencies will be able to review your CV and simply get lost. A recruiter can present your CV to the right person, with a recommendation, assuming they have met him and qualify his experience, but again, do your research on the recruiter first: How much do they know about the company? How eloquently can they answer your questions about the business, the people, the culture? Beware of the "agency" who simply wants to use your CV as a way to open a door to a business with which they do not have a genuine relationship.

  1. You realize that you could earn 50% more elsewhere, and when you apply, you get multiple offers in the first week.
  2. You're so stressed out about incompetence where you work that you know it won't turn out right (and they go broke two months after you leave)
  3. You realize that all that time in college studying for job A was a waste because several years later you know you need to switch to a different area of ​​work.

That said, work = work and work <> fun. There is probably no job where you love all things work, and if such a job exists, you probably won't earn a

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  1. You realize that you could earn 50% more elsewhere, and when you apply, you get multiple offers in the first week.
  2. You're so stressed out about incompetence where you work that you know it won't turn out right (and they go broke two months after you leave)
  3. You realize that all that time in college studying for job A was a waste because several years later you know you need to switch to a different area of ​​work.

That said, work = work and work <> fun. There probably isn't any job where you love everything about work, and if such a job exists, you probably won't make a million dollars doing it. Consider your strengths, your area of ​​expertise, and then see if you can find a job that matches. But, while looking for that golden opportunity, hang on and work whatever job you can get to pay the bills. He used to spread pig manure and came home smelling awful. But, it paid for an advanced degree and after working 15 years in the IT industry, I now own my own business. Yes, MENSA IQ works to spread pig manure. I did it because I paid for the titles I got later,

Note: They call it work because it is. If it was a hobby, you wouldn't be paid to do it. I have never met anyone who loves everything about their job after working there for over 3 years. (This is not heaven).

Q: When looking for work through a recruiter, is it okay to seek (and potentially land) a job on your own?

I don't think you understand how recruiters work. Recruiters don't work for their candidates. They work for their clients' companies to fill positions that those companies cannot fill themselves. Those client companies are paying high fees for this service, between 20% and 30% of the annualized starting salary of the selected candidate. Perhaps the best way to put it is that recruiters can't find jobs for people; they find people for jobs.

If contacted by a recruiter who

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Q: When looking for work through a recruiter, is it okay to seek (and potentially land) a job on your own?

I don't think you understand how recruiters work. Recruiters don't work for their candidates. They work for their clients' companies to fill positions that those companies cannot fill themselves. Those client companies are paying high fees for this service, between 20% and 30% of the annualized starting salary of the selected candidate. Perhaps the best way to put it is that recruiters can't find jobs for people; they find people for jobs.

If you are contacted by a recruiter who is working on an opening that is of interest to you, great. Go ahead and explore it. But please don't think the recruiter is there to help you find a job. You may have excellent qualifications, but you are likely just one of as many as a dozen candidates that the recruiter presents to his client. That company may also be looking for multiple candidates who came to them directly and don't have to pay any fees to hire them.

Why choose? Do both. Apply through the website and contact the recruiter. Unless you are an independent recruiter. If you are contacted by an independent recruiter and then go directly to the company's website and apply for the same job, you can prevent them from getting it. It would save the company recruiter fees, but legitimate companies don't bankrupt their recruiters and would likely disqualify you from working there. Any company that hired you knowing they screwed up the recruiter might not be a place you'd like to work.

Looking for sites to find candidates, blogs, or sites to work for?

LinkedIn and GitHub are great places to find candidates. You can also use RecruitEm for X-ray searches.

Some great industry blogs are Recruiter.com, RecruitLoop Blog - Recruiting On Demand, and RecruitingBlogs - I think Mary Hunt covered a lot of the other sites.

Recruiters have excellent opportunities to earn money online. Some of the sites include RecruitLoop.com, CrowdRecruiting.com, and Recruitifi.com.

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