What did you think the moment you arrived in Canada and got off the plane?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Benjamin Gordon



What did you think the moment you arrived in Canada and got off the plane?

Mixed emotions.

I was very excited to start a new journey in a completely new country. So much promise. Lots of potential. Great opportunity to start from scratch. Drink.

He was 37 years old. I was very scared. He had just dropped everything he knew and what he was used to. Leave our two jobs. We sold our car and house. Liquidated all our possessions. Collected all my retirement funds. I left all my friends and family behind. They even threw us goodbye parties.

Sometimes you have to burn your bridges to make it work. We didn't want to turn around and run home, although I'm not going to lie, we both wanted to do it a couple of times.

We

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Mixed emotions.

I was very excited to start a new journey in a completely new country. So much promise. Lots of potential. Great opportunity to start from scratch. Drink.

He was 37 years old. I was very scared. He had just dropped everything he knew and what he was used to. Leave our two jobs. We sold our car and house. Liquidated all our possessions. Collected all my retirement funds. I left all my friends and family behind. They even threw us goodbye parties.

Sometimes you have to burn your bridges to make it work. We didn't want to turn around and run home, although I'm not going to lie, we both wanted to do it a couple of times.

We went on, dug in our heels, and made it work. We are glad we did not give up.

You know what they say, in the end everything is worth it.

It's so true.

Here are some other relevant answers:

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to What advice can you give a family moving to Canada with an Express Entry Permit?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to If getting a Canadian PR and citizenship is easier than getting GC in the US, why aren't more people moving to Canada instead of waiting endlessly for the elusive green card in the US? USA?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s Answer to Why Should You Consider Immigrating to Canada Over the USA?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s response to What was your initial struggle like as a new immigrant in Canada?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s response to How was your experience landing a job in Canada as a PR holder for Express Entry?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to Is Canada as cold as the people who live there think it is?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to What fun activities can kids do or participate in in the winter months in GTA Ontario in Canada?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to Do you regret moving to Canada?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to What is the cheapest food in Canada?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s Answer to What's the Best Retirement Planning Advice for a New Immigrant to Canada?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to Why do so many people live in Ontario and the rest of Canada is practically empty?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to How expensive is life in Ontario?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to What didn't people tell you about living in Canada that you had to find out for yourself?

I am so happy to be home!

To be fair, that was three years ago and I had just returned from a weekend trip to New York City. New York used to be a lot better than Toronto. Now, not so much, it is a wash.

It didn't help that we were stuck on the track for twenty minutes because our gate was not available. Of course, I managed to overcome a very difficult level of Candy Crush in that interval. I also had trouble getting my internet working because the phone detected a border crossing and shut down data services to avoid roaming charges.

January 2, 1969. Montreal. He was in the process of emigrating from England. The "cold factor" (I had no idea what that was, but I knew it was not good) was a terribly negative number. When I poked my head out of the airport, I practically suffocated from frozen lungs. "My God". I thought "What have I done?"

Still here 50 years later.

Before moving to Canada, I tried my luck in a couple of Middle Eastern cities like Doha and Dubai. But the job search experience and immigration hurdles were a nightmare in Dubai / Doha, while in Canada it was pretty easy and straightforward.

Advantages of immigrating to Canada (and others like the US, Australia, Europe, etc.)

  1. In Canada, recruitment is based on the merit and skills of the candidate. Whereas in Dubai or Doha, it is based on a "recommendation" (not a referral) and it all depends on a friend or family member who can offer a job in your company. Many times you have to pay
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Before moving to Canada, I tried my luck in a couple of Middle Eastern cities like Doha and Dubai. But the job search experience and immigration hurdles were a nightmare in Dubai / Doha, while in Canada it was pretty easy and straightforward.

Advantages of immigrating to Canada (and others like the US, Australia, Europe, etc.)

  1. In Canada, recruitment is based on the merit and skills of the candidate. Whereas in Dubai or Doha, it is based on a "recommendation" (not a referral) and it all depends on a friend or family member who can offer a job in your company. Many times, you must pay for these services directly to the person or outside company that helped you get the job.
  2. In Canada, if you immigrate through PR, you can technically live in Canada until death. In the meantime, you can change jobs as you wish, get laid off, enroll in a university, be unemployed, do various jobs, get married, get divorced, have a relationship, etc., and still live in Canada. While in the Middle East, your visa is linked to an employer. If you take a career break or get fired, you are supposed to leave the country. This includes your spouse and your children who go to school as well. You get divorced and things get complicated with the visa of the spouse and also with that of the child. And forget about living with your partner without getting married.
  3. Canada grants citizenship after 3 to 4 years of stay.
  4. You can earn more than a native Canadian if you have the right skills. Whereas in Duba or Doha, citizens are paid much more despite having poor grades. It is also a fact that European and North American employees are paid more than those in South or Southeast Asia or Africa. There is too much discrimination there.
  5. Many places to travel. Canada has beaches, hiking trails, national and provincial parks, snow-capped mountains, endless grasslands, ski resorts, thousands of lakes and rivers, waterfalls (Niagara), rich variety of flora and fauna. And if you compare it with the countries of the Middle East, they have some beaches, sand dunes, some parks, malls and artificial luxury hotels. That is all.
  6. Weather: I personally prefer Canadian weather conditions. We can spend a lot of time outdoors during the 3 summer months with temperatures between 25 and 35ºC. The sun sets at 9:30 pm, which is another amazing aspect of summer. During 3 months of spring and 3 months of autumn we can also spend time outdoors with the appropriate jackets. Autumn is the most beautiful season. The rest of the 3 winter months may have some restrictions, but I still go skiing. Sometimes a walk through the streets. Now Dubai is so hot most of the year that you can only spend time outside at night.
  7. Office politics hardly exist in Canada. Nobody cares about their salary or their position. Nobody surrenders to your personal life. Whereas the work culture of the Middle East is horrible. I have not worked there but I know it from my father, my in-laws and other relatives who work / worked there. Everyone struggles to climb to the top. Everyone tries to impress the boss. Everybody tries to bring you down. Everyone knows everyone's salary and gets involved in their personal life.
  8. Canada has many excellent universities. I live near the University of Waterloo, which is "best" in Computer Science and Mathematics. Then we have the U for Toronto, BC, Alberta, etc. Being a PR and while we qualify we can study in these places. In Dubai, unless approved by your employer, you cannot pursue higher education. And even then, they don't have world-class universities there.
  9. Canada is better than the Middle East for low-income families. First of all, if a foreign (male) employee in Dubai has a low-income job, he will most likely not be able to bring his family to live with him. Even if it is somehow possible, it will be expensive. The family may not be covered by the employer's insurance. The education of children will be expensive. The rent is expensive. It is legally impossible for the husband to do a second job to cover additional expenses. However, in Canada, a person can look for a job from 8 to 4 and then drive Uber at night. The family is automatically covered by the provincial health and is free. Schooling is free. The spouse can do any job without restrictions. Large subsidies for day care centers. And the best of all,
  10. In Canada, even a middle-income middle class can live in backyard houses. You also have a lot of trees in your neighborhood. The photo below is from the neighborhood where I live. Imagine that the middle class lives here. In Dubai, most of the time you will live in an apartment if you are middle class.

Advantages of living in Dubai (personal opinion only)

  1. More sun.
  2. Closer to my home in India.
  3. Food: I lean towards Arab cuisines.

Now about taxes: even though I hate paying taxes, I know I get some of it back. For example, my child receives the amount of child benefit every month. Our medical care is free. The child's schooling is free. My wife receives maternity benefits. I have paternity. We get paid a decent amount of money each month if we lose our jobs. Especially during the coronavirus pandemic, those who lost their jobs received $ 2000 (CERB) monthly for 6 months. For every $ 1000 I invest in my children's higher education, the government invests $ 200. There are many more. So all the taxes we pay don't go down the drain.

I immigrated to Canada when I was 13 with my mother, from China. Life was difficult with just the two of us. His education was not recognized, so he had to work in jobs that paid the minimum wage. My mother had problems of her own and never became fluent in English. I guess it had to do with the initial setback she experienced, which led to years of depression. He recently moved to Taiwan after retiring.

I started my life here in the eighth grade, but quickly moved on to high school. My English was very poor at the time, but I improved very quickly. Some people here mentioned that high school

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I immigrated to Canada when I was 13 with my mother, from China. Life was difficult with just the two of us. His education was not recognized, so he had to work in jobs that paid the minimum wage. My mother had problems of her own and never became fluent in English. I guess it had to do with the initial setback she experienced, which led to years of depression. He recently moved to Taiwan after retiring.

I started my life here in the eighth grade, but quickly moved on to high school. My English was very poor at the time, but I improved very quickly. Some people here mentioned that the high school system here is very strict and they would not allow you to skip any grades. I experienced the same opposition to skipping grades, but managed to convince my school to let me take math and science courses two years before my degree. For English they wanted to put me in ESL but I resisted, how could I learn English if they put me in a class full of students who couldn't speak English either? I thought ESL would be a horrible environment that would stop me, so I protested and demanded that they put me in regular English classes along with all the Canadian-born children. Everyone (my school principal, teachers, counselor, my mother, etc. ) everyone warned me not to do that, but I told them that if I failed, I would take full responsibility. It turned out to be a wise decision. By the end of high school, he was winning all the honors and awards, including in English and French. Since I had a two-year head start in math and science, I took all the advanced-level courses the school had to offer, whatever: law, accounting, advanced French, sociology, world history, political science, etc. It was fun. I also volunteered and did many enrichment activities. You name it: law, accounting, advanced French, sociology, world history, political science, etc. It was fun. I also volunteered and did many enrichment activities. whatever: law, accounting, Advanced French, Sociology, World History, Political Science, etc. It was fun. I also volunteered and did many enrichment activities.

One thing I really want to point out is that YOUR CANADIAN EXPERIENCE IS WHAT YOU DO WITH IT. Look at my mother and me. He spiraled into negativity after some initial difficulties; while I also encountered difficulties, opposition, lack of support, etc. but I always defended myself and demanded what I wanted and what I thought would be the best for me. When I first entered the school system, I was scared and lonely. Nobody wanted to work in a group with me because my English was poor. I had no friends. Even Chinese kids who had been in Canada longer than I made fun of me. But the key was that I never let those things bother me. There are good and bad people. Ignore the bad guys and actively seek out those who are willing to help you. I looked for those people and made the most of whatever support I could get. That really paid off. So my heartfelt advice to any newcomer to this country is: don't lose hope, be brave, and work hard. Be their strong advocate too! When others don't know what you are capable of, show them. At the end of high school, I was quite a popular girl and I got to choose who I wanted to work with on group projects (everyone wanted me to be in their groups since I was always the A + student). The table had really changed. She was quite a popular girl and I got to choose who I wanted to work with on group projects (everyone wanted me to be in their groups since I was always the A + student). The table had really changed. She was quite a popular girl and I got to choose who I wanted to work with on group projects (everyone wanted me to be in their groups since I was always the A + student). The table had really changed.

Many of you also mentioned that your cultural ties are strong. Well, I felt the same. But once again, I knew what I wanted and went for it. Instead of living at home while attending the University of Toronto, I took a scholarship with almost full tuition coverage from the University of Ottawa and moved on my own. My mom was very upset, she threatened to disown me, but she had my reasons: the University of Toronto is undoubtedly very prestigious, but for undergraduate education, prestige doesn't matter that much. The University of Ottawa offered me a full scholarship that would allow me to be independent. I thought it was a very valuable experience that really allowed me to grow not only academically but on many personal levels. That also turned out to be a wise decision. After earning my Bachelor of Science and Engineering in 5.5 years, I returned to Toronto and began the doctoral program in Laboratory Medicine at the University of Toronto. At this point, I had shown my mother that I could make good decisions about my life, so she took a step back. My poor dear mother considers me a kind of miracle and now she always says “I don't know how you achieved what you did… I don't know how you had the courage to do that… I don't know how you could learn English so fast…” I just told her that the secret was that, unlike her, I never gave up.

However, I must point out that the reason my mother did not influence me much was because I did not grow up with her. Instead, I grew up with my grandparents who instilled in me good values ​​and work ethic. My grandfather, in particular, was a war veteran and he also lived through decades of turmoil in recent Chinese history. Whenever things were difficult, he remembered his words: "On the battlefield, with bullets flying overhead, enemies charging at you, your best chance of survival is to charge forward with courage and hope for the best." I knew what was right and wrong and what I had to do to be successful in life thanks to my grandparents. I had little fear of facing my mother because I guess she had less influence on me ...

In terms of culture shock, well ... my advice to newcomers to this country is to observe others but at the same time be yourself. But always be kind and polite, and people will notice. You may act differently, but in time, your good intentions will be known, and kindness is appreciated by all people of all cultures.

Air Canada has a couple of levels of service. Air Canada itself is traditionally priced and has a bit more legroom.

Air Canada Rouge is your affordable service. To achieve lower prices, the seats are squeezed close together. In April 2019, I flew from Toronto to Lima in economy class and there was about an inch and a half between my knee and the seat in front. Since the flight was lightly booked, I was able to change my location to an empty row and have side room instead of leg room.

I found Air Canada Rouge's southbound service to be exemplary. Every hour, the flight attendants

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Air Canada has a couple of levels of service. Air Canada itself is traditionally priced and has a bit more legroom.

Air Canada Rouge is your affordable service. To achieve lower prices, the seats are squeezed close together. In April 2019, I flew from Toronto to Lima in economy class and there was about an inch and a half between my knee and the seat in front. Since the flight was lightly booked, I was able to change my location to an empty row and have side room instead of leg room.

I found Air Canada Rouge's southbound service to be exemplary. Every hour, flight attendants passed by the 767's cockpit and offered water. Meals were okay, but probably of a cheaper variety than regular Air Canada offerings. It tasted good, but it seemed a bit small.

On my return flight, I opted to pay $ 85 more for an economy seat with extra legroom. Given that it was a 767 night flight from Bogota to Toronto, a little more room to help sleep seemed like a good idea. However, there are two problems. The additional $ 85 costs a little over $ 100 due to taxes. Canada charges taxes on goods and services, so it seems strange that it is charged when legroom is neither a good nor a service. The second problem is that the seat itself was very uncomfortable. While it was nice to have the space to stretch, I couldn't sit for more than half an hour before the pain and discomfort set in. I spent much of the flight standing up and walking the aisles.

So home to Canada. From Toronto, I need a commuter flight to get home. It's an hour in a Dash 8. No problem! Except my 8:00 AM flight was delayed due to a mechanical problem. While I was waiting for them to figure that out, a flight to London, Ontario was delayed due to a mechanical problem. After a while, they got another plane for the London crowd, but announced that the flight to Sudbury was canceled ... due to mechanical problems.

They finally decided to consolidate my 8:00 a.m. flight. M. With a flight at noon, which caused further delays. Sometime after noon, we finally got on our plane. Just as we were buckled up, the pilot announced that there was a mechanical problem and that we would have to go back to the waiting room while they unloaded our luggage and brought in another plane to use.

Yes, we finally left and the flight was uneventful. The last thing I needed after a sleepless night flight was six hours hanging around a departure lounge to hear about a list of flights canceled due to mechanical problems.

My first experiences blew my mind by the almost total absence of anything strange! And then finally. . . Oh wait. I was ahead of my story.

EARLY YEARS NOT REALLY ALL THAT FOREIGN

I flew as an Air Force pilot, but I only flew within the US After that, I flew for Eastern Air Lines, which took me to Mexico, Canada, Bermuda, and just about every country in the Caribbean. Those were so close to the US and everyone I found spoke English so they didn't look like foreign countries. I never really thought of them in terms of Oh wow, I'm in a foreign country now!

MY FIRST REAL FOREIGN EXPE

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My first experiences blew my mind by the almost total absence of anything strange! And then finally. . . Oh wait. I was ahead of my story.

EARLY YEARS NOT REALLY ALL THAT FOREIGN

I flew as an Air Force pilot, but I only flew within the US After that, I flew for Eastern Air Lines, which took me to Mexico, Canada, Bermuda, and just about every country in the Caribbean. Those were so close to the US and everyone I found spoke English so they didn't look like foreign countries. I never really thought of them in terms of Oh wow, I'm in a foreign country now!

MY FIRST REAL FOREIGN EXPERIENCE, WELL, IT ALMOST WASN'T!

The first time I crossed a pond to get to a foreign country was when I went to South Africa. I thought, now, I'll see foreign things there, right? It wouldn't be just American things where people wear sandals and shorts, right?

I was on a business trip and arrived at 8 in the morning. They wanted me to work that day, which was fine with me because I had slept on the plane.

The guy who picked me up was driving an American car. I don't remember what, but I thought, at least in the Caribbean I traveled in some rare Asian brand cars that I had never heard of before, and now I'm in fucking AFRICA!

I'll see foreign things soon, right?

Then he took me to the hotel, a Holiday Inn. I thought, are you kidding me? Am I staying at a Holiday Inn? It looked much less foreign than most of the Caribbean hotels I had stayed in; It could have been anywhere in America. They gave me an hour to freshen up and then the boy would take me to the office.

I'll see foreign things soon, right?

I turned on the TV to see what they had in South Africa. The first thing that came up was a talk show where Paul Simon was being interviewed. I thought: No! An American musician is the first thing I see at my Holiday Inn in Africa!

I'll see foreign things soon, right?

They took me to the office and it looked like any office in the United States. I was a computer consultant, I was there to work on their systems, so it made sense that they had American-made computers with Windows, Hewlett-Packard printers, etc., etc.

I'll see foreign things soon, right?

At the end of the day, they dropped me off at my Holiday Inn and now I was starving. Of course, most of you are familiar with the dinner exercise in countries outside the United States, which is why dinner starts late. The nearby restaurant didn't open for a couple of hours and I couldn't wait.

At least now I will see foreign things!

I went around the block and saw two restaurants open next to each other. A bloody McDonald's and a Kentucky Fried Chicken. Damn golden bows and that white-ass colonel Sanders! Around the corner there was a Pizza Hut. These were on the same block as the Shell and Exxon gas stations.

Now I'm thinking, I will NEVER see foreign things, right?

There was no way I was eating my first African meal at an American restaurant chain, but there was nothing else open and I was passing out from lack of food.

But then! I saw an African store. It wasn't Safeway or Food Lion. It had a foreign name and appearance. I went in, and there, finally, I saw foreign things!

They had all kinds of food that I had never seen before. I cooked a small meal from the deli, crossed the street to a park, sat on the grass under one of the most beautiful things I had EVER seen before, a walkway lined with blooming purple jacarandas, and had a picnic.

Now THAT was a foreign thing!

As a teacher, she had taken a group of students to Greece on vacation during the winter break. This was many years ago when Greece was in crisis, except for tourists who brought much needed funds. There was an incident with drugs, which were not as common as now and a student had overdosed on something. I was on call and the student from another school was in the local emergency room being treated. Interestingly, there was a small police station attached to this small medical center. Unfortunately, at the same time a suicide had occurred that was not related to the student, but to the police.

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As a teacher, she had taken a group of students to Greece on vacation during the winter break. This was many years ago when Greece was in crisis, except for tourists who brought much needed funds. There was an incident with drugs, which were not as common as now and a student had overdosed on something. I was on call and the student from another school was in the local emergency room being treated. Interestingly, there was a small police station attached to this small medical center. Unfortunately, at the same time there was a suicide unrelated to the student, but the police were covering all the bases and called me in to question and clarify the student aspect of the problem. Two policemen, a woman began to question me. Only one could speak English and the other policeman pulled out his revolver and placed it rather threateningly on the table. The female officer was quite overwhelmed by the suicide problem and was being significantly crushed with the Metaxa brandy, insisting that she go see this suicide victim. Naturally, that was the furthest thing from my mind and I was answering each and every question assuring both officers that I was a Canadian teacher and had nothing to do with suicide or the drug problem except the extent to which I was ensuring that the student received proper care. . Most Canadians never have to stand up and declare their nationality, but trust me I did it that time. insisting that you go see this suicide victim. Naturally, that was the furthest thing from my mind and I was answering each and every question assuring both officers that I was a Canadian teacher and had nothing to do with suicide or the drug problem except the extent to which I was ensuring that the student received proper care. . Most Canadians never have to stand up and declare their nationality, but trust me I did it that time. insisting that you go see this suicide victim. Naturally, that was the furthest thing from my mind and I was answering each and every question assuring both officers that I was a Canadian teacher and had nothing to do with suicide or the drug problem, except to the extent that I was making sure the student received proper attention. . Most Canadians never have to stand up and declare their nationality, but trust me I did it that time.

My 28 year old daughter and I were traveling together last month. We both sat in the aisle seats facing each other so that we would be comfortable during our 5 hour flight. The flight was very full and it seemed that everyone had finished boarding as all the passengers were seated and the flight attendants were making preparations for take off. Just as they were closing the security door, a last-minute straggler entered the plane.

I didn't pay much attention while absorbed in a book, but was suddenly distracted by a body odor that was so strong that it assaulted my senses. I looked up at

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My 28 year old daughter and I were traveling together last month. We both sat in the aisle seats facing each other so that we would be comfortable during our 5 hour flight. The flight was very full and it seemed that everyone had finished boarding as all the passengers were seated and the flight attendants were making preparations for take off. Just as they were closing the security door, a last-minute straggler entered the plane.

I didn't pay much attention while absorbed in a book, but was suddenly distracted by a body odor that was so strong that it assaulted my senses. I looked up to see that the offensive odor was coming from the straggler and that it was in the hallway next to me. I quickly realized that he was going to try to sit in the middle seat next to my daughter. I thought to myself "you have to be kidding me", there is no way I can fit in one seat. There must be a mistake because I should have had to buy 2 seats.

As he made his way in line, he raised the armrest and took up the 1.75 seat space. Her body spilled onto my daughter's seat (she weighs very little {93 pounds} and yet was crushed into a small ball) while her large legs were extended into the space where my daughter's legs belonged. His whole body was completely against my daughter.

I went to the back of the plane to speak with a flight attendant who came to check on the situation. He said: “That passenger definitely needs two seats. They should have stopped him on the way. There's no way I would want that situation if it was my daughter. "Unfortunately, there was no other seat to move to. Not only did she take the 2 passenger space, but when I told my daughter to leave the armrest to define her space staff, he got belligerent, speaking profanity to me and saying, “Hey, I'm a big guy and these seats are too small.” Then he made it clear that we were going to be punished for the entire five-hour flight. Suddenly he raised his armrest and began his battle plan that would prevent my daughter from sleeping, breathing fresh air, and experiencing peace after a long day.

Because it was a night flight from 8 pm to 1 am, the pilot turned off all the interior lights so that the passengers could sleep. The plane was completely dark with the exception of our row, as the man turned on the overhead light as well as the flashlight on his phone. He watched with smug satisfaction as his bright lights kept us from sleeping. He did it as punishment for trying to lower the armrest.

The airlines acknowledged that they had dropped the ball and reiterated that they should have been forced to buy a second seat at the gate. His compensation for the nightmare flight was an apology and a $ 50 voucher. Needless to say, I no longer fly Southwest, unless I have to. My husband had flown 125,000 miles on Southwest each year for the past 5 years, earning me free companion status. However, I was so aggrieved that I will give up free travel with Southwest, preferring to fly with Delta as they take better care of us.

The
students often arrive A2A International Canada and they do it in different places, so I have no idea what might have been their various reactions.

Asking this question, I suspect you have no idea how HUGE Canada is geographically. It is a huge country. Given that, I suspect that different students had different reactions, depending on what they expected, when they arrived, and where they landed.

I think I understand why you ask ... I suppose you may be a little concerned ... but Canada is a very safe, peaceful and well regulated country. You can expect officials to be friendly and

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The
students often arrive A2A International Canada and they do it in different places, so I have no idea what might have been their various reactions.

Asking this question, I suspect you have no idea how HUGE Canada is geographically. It is a huge country. Given that, I suspect that different students had different reactions, depending on what they expected, when they arrived, and where they landed.

I think I understand why you ask ... I suppose you may be a little concerned ... but Canada is a very safe, peaceful and well regulated country. You can expect officials to be polite and professional. Without a doubt, they are used to the arrival of international students. Just follow their instructions.

They will probably process your paperwork fairly quickly, everything is computerized, and they will explain everything you need to know. Some people from developing countries have told me that Canada “works the way it is supposed to”, which they viewed as positive.

You should probably check with your school because postsecondary institutions that enroll international students generally have information and support programs for those students.

I admit that everything is very different right now because of the pandemic, but people are figuring out how to fix it and still keep everyone as safe as possible.

I hope it helps.

Thanks for A2A.

Getting a job in Canada when you are not here is a challenge! However, if your skill is in high demand here, you will get it!

  1. Check your skills on the National Occupational Classification (NOC) list. This will give you an idea of ​​whether or not you will get a job!
  2. Register with the Canadian government job board at Your career starts here. High demand jobs are listed here.
  3. Fill in the form at the JobBank link above very accurately. People really read your app in my experience!
  4. Make your resume in Canadian format. Get to know the companies that interest you and contact them
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Thanks for A2A.

Getting a job in Canada when you are not here is a challenge! However, if your skill is in high demand here, you will get it!

  1. Check your skills on the National Occupational Classification (NOC) list. This will give you an idea of ​​whether or not you will get a job!
  2. Register with the Canadian government job board at Your career starts here. High demand jobs are listed here.
  3. Fill in the form at the JobBank link above very accurately. People really read your app in my experience!
  4. Make your resume in Canadian format. Learn about the companies you are interested in and contact them via LinkedIn or submit a request directly to their site.
  5. Finally, join a company in your country that has a branch in Canada and transfer.

I hope this helps!

If the interlocutor has not seen the short film 'Reefer Madness', I recommend that he do so, he is hysterical. Mind you, I mean hysterically funny, but he's also hysterical in his scary propaganda that the interrogator may still buy. It was made in the 30s or 40s, I think.

What's funny today about the fear that rages around marijuana legalization is how off-base it is and how unscientific it is. Does alcohol lead to harder drugs? It may be a first step for people, but there is nothing to say that it is a cause. Nor is legality likely to be a cause. There is a lot of fear out there about what

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If the interlocutor has not seen the short film 'Reefer Madness', I recommend that he do so, he is hysterical. Mind you, I mean hysterically funny, but he's also hysterical in his scary propaganda that the interrogator may still buy. It was made in the 30s or 40s, I think.

What's funny today about the fear that rages around marijuana legalization is how off-base it is and how unscientific it is. Does alcohol lead to harder drugs? It may be a first step for people, but there is nothing to say that it is a cause. Nor is legality likely to be a cause. There is a lot of fear about what to do with people who drive on drugs. Well, what have we done with all the people who drive on drugs over the last few decades? The fact is, controlling marijuana will allow for more tools to control drugged driving.

WHO WILL SPEAK FOR THE CHILDREN !? Again, controlling it will offer more opportunities to keep it out of the reach of minors. What about the harsher drugs like, say, crack smoking that the interrogator is trying to connect here? Well, if the (government-regulated) marijuana supplier is no longer in the business of supplying crack as well, the chances of one leading to the other are greatly diminished, NOT increased.

Fear is rarely thought through. I know, I'm afraid of heights and when it comes down to it, fear paralyzes a lot of my rational thinking. That's right, I guess.

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