What did you notice during an interview that made you not want the job?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Lewis Hunt



What did you notice during an interview that made you not want the job?

I guess the first sign should have been the ad in the newspaper.

Let me back up a bit. I had just moved to SF and needed a job. Craigslist was not yet relatively incomplete, but online job searches were mostly spam and scams, but the trusted newspaper offered some hope. I got a crossover ad that said something about working outdoors and hippies. At the time, I liked both, so I called the number on the ad and they asked me to attend an interview in South San Francisco. A few days later I drove and ended up in a warehouse that was full of boxes with chairs in some rows and one of

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I guess the first sign should have been the ad in the newspaper.

Let me back up a bit. I had just moved to SF and needed a job. Craigslist was not yet relatively incomplete, but online job searches were mostly spam and scams, but the trusted newspaper offered some hope. I got a crossover ad that said something about working outdoors and hippies. At the time, I liked both, so I called the number on the ad and they asked me to attend an interview in South San Francisco. A few days later I drove and ended up in a warehouse that was full of boxes with chairs in some rows and a desk in front of them. I take a seat in one of the rows and smile at a pretty girl behind me.

We are all waiting and finally a huge guy comes out and sits at the desk. Now I would have called it creepy, but at the time I thought it was a guy. He started talking about the job and what kind of person can do it, but never said what it was about (red flag # 700). One by one they called all of us to the desk, when it was my turn, I walked over, sat down and they asked me some questions. I don't really remember what they were except for what attracted me to the ad. He asked if it was the hippy part. I said yes and he smiled. Strange. Anyway, he said he liked it and should come back for another job interview / shadow. He needed a job so he was excited to take the next step.

A few days later, (I really don't remember how long) I went back to the warehouse. I walked in and was greeted by the creepy boss and he introduced me to the guy I would be following. He was a friendly middle-aged man with a mustache. He started loading boxes into a van and they finally let me know what the job actually was ... We were going to drive to random deals and try to sell prints of various famous paintings for their offices.

I immediately realized that I didn't want to do this, but I was broke and needed a job. So I got in the truck.

We started driving down South SF and the guy, let's call him Dave, I have no idea what his name was, but whatever. Then Dave starts telling me what the job is and how it works. We didn't get a list of businesses, we would just drive to various office parks and warehouses and approach random businesses with one of these prints and try to sell them to anyone we come across. Usually they were receptionists or office managers. He said we would get a lot of rejection, but sometimes people would buy a lot of prints.

Dave was a very nice guy and he said he would buy me lunch and if I wasn't at work he would take me back to my car at the warehouse. He also told me how cool the boss was, there would be parties at his house and they could use his hot tub ...

We had to spend 8 hours selling prints. After going to the first few businesses, I learned why offices would put up "No solicitors" signs. Most of the time we got a polite no, but one time the office manager got really pushy that Dave wouldn't take no for an answer and they said they were calling the police. We quickly got out of there. I remember Dave sounding a little sad but he was trying to hide it and tell me how great the job was. I wasn't convinced and was realizing that I wanted to go home and save the rest of the day. We had lunch at a restaurant in Oakland and shortly after finishing I told Dave that the job was not for me and asked if he could drive me back to my car in South SF. Said he really couldn't do that since it would waste a lot of time that you might be selling. I reminded him that he said he would, but insisted that he couldn't waste time and that the boss would be angry. After going back and forth for a while, I asked him if he would drop me off at a MUNI station. He agreed, we passed the Raider stadium at that point and I saw a sign indicating a train station. I asked him if he would take me and he said yes, but instead he dropped me at the entrance of the stadium parking lot and I had to walk to the other side of the stadium to get to the station. I got there and took a train home. I asked him if he would take me and he said yes, but instead he dropped me at the entrance of the stadium parking lot and I had to walk to the other side of the stadium to get to the station. I got there and took a train home. I asked him if he would take me and he said yes, but instead he dropped me at the entrance of the stadium parking lot and I had to walk to the other side of the stadium to get to the station. I got there and took a train home.

I called my girlfriend and told her what happened, she was understanding and bought me Chipotle for dinner to help make up for a very weird and shitty experience.

Mentioned elsewhere but shortly: I had just earned a BA in Accounting and had been in a part-time internship for two years. I had experience in life, being about 10 years older than my fellow graduates, but that, as I was about to learn, meant practically nothing in an entry-level accounting position. (Half a dozen interviews had already told me he was great, the best candidate they ever talked to, etc. but at my age and clearly married, he was too old. Maybe he should try the sales ...).

So I was surprised when I got an interview call to a medical clinic and it was for the Accounting Manager. I had no medical background and manager

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Mentioned elsewhere but shortly: I had just earned a BA in Accounting and had been in a part-time internship for two years. I had experience in life, being about 10 years older than my fellow graduates, but that, as I was about to learn, meant practically nothing in an entry-level accounting position. (Half a dozen interviews had already told me he was great, the best candidate they ever talked to, etc. but at my age and clearly married, he was too old. Maybe he should try the sales ...).

So I was surprised when I got an interview call to a medical clinic and it was for the Accounting Manager. He had no medical experience and the managerial level for a first job was over the top. I sent resumes to small operations because often a "manager" title was not the same one I would have in a larger company.

One red flag was when the clinic's medical director told me that they had a paid staff of 22 and several dozen volunteers. My "small office" idea was maybe 4 or 5 people, where the accounting "manager" was actually little more than an accountant / office manager.

It was a holistic clinic (okay) but supported by a fundamentalist church. He didn't have to be of that religion, they told me, but he had to act as one of their faith would while on duty. Do not swear, do not drink during work hours, or act in other immoral ways. My free time was mine, however, I could not openly participate in something that violated one of its basic principles. For example, being caught leaving an adult club, arrested for drugs, being in a parade for gay or women's rights, etc. There is a big red flag there.

But the most important thing to me was that although I would report directly to the CFO, I would be responsible for all day-to-day financial operations. Nobody puts an inexperienced person in charge of the finances of an operation of the size I was describing. It was a non-profit organization, but that doesn't make accounting easy.

The CFO (whom I also knew) was a member of the church and, like the doctor, was also on the board. Even though he was my boss, I only saw him maybe once a week when he came to pick up the finances. New and inexperienced accountant, not only in full charge but also without supervision or guidance? Something was not right here.

They made an offer two days later, but luckily, another much more suitable offer was pending. I rejected them. The doctor offered me 5% and then 10% more on the spot to agree. Not yet. The last red flag was when I called again 4 or 5 days later, willing to increase my salary by 20% over the initial offer and appoint the position of Assistant Controller. Bad… bad… very bad …… ..

Five months later I read that the clinic had been shut down in a joint raid by the IRS, the New York State Department of Health, and the New York State Police. Among the crimes: failure to remit tax withholdings, filing false financial and other statements, illegal working conditions, obviously abused by people with learning disabilities ... some of the "volunteers" and some other charges that I forget. The doctor, his wife, the financial director and another official ended up with a serious prison sentence. The church itself rejected any knowledge of what the clinic was doing, even though four of the five directors (including the doctor and the chief financial officer) were members.

This job interview was the first one I got related to the 2 year college diploma I got in 2004. This was in 2006 or maybe 2007. Since I graduated from college, I had been working in a local warehouse, my uncle It helped me to get some income while looking for a career. This was it, my first steps towards something more meaningful and satisfying than climbing a thousand boxes of 20 to 40 kg night after night.

The company was one of those that specialized in the sale, installation and maintenance of laundry equipment for commercial and industrial purposes. Most of his clients were insti

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This job interview was the first one I got related to the 2 year college diploma I got in 2004. This was in 2006 or maybe 2007. Since I graduated from college, I had been working in a local warehouse, my uncle It helped me to get some income while looking for a career. This was it, my first steps towards something more meaningful and satisfying than climbing a thousand boxes of 20 to 40 kg night after night.

The company was one of those that specialized in the sale, installation and maintenance of laundry equipment for commercial and industrial purposes. Most of his clients were institutional in nature: nursing homes and hospitals, with a few laundries as well. During the interview, he is trying his best to make me nervous about the good company they worked for. Family owned, very 'close by', lots of travel (apparently a point of sale), benefits package, pension plan, general recognition for employees (business owner gave you a quad or ATV if you prefer for 25 or 30 years of service) paid meals while out of the store, lots of overtime, etc.

So this sounded pretty good so far, and he more or less confirmed that I had the job before I left, as there were no other interviewees. This is when I first had a slight misgivings about his speech. Just interviewed? Here at Cape Breton NS, with its 15% unemployment rate among working age people, and with a university within 20 miles that produces about 20 people each year in my course, and dozens of others with enough cross-educated that could possibly have been considered qualified. enough to apply? That is a bit suspicious.

Ok, but what were you saying about a lot of overtime? I'm going to lose about $ 2 an hour compared to my current job, so I'd definitely be interested in making up for that loss.

What he was saying was that the company rewards overtime worked with an equal amount of paid time off at a pleasant time in the future. Great, until he said he was probably owed a few thousand hours that he will never get off the ground, since at the time it was just him working out of the store, with his wife doing volunteer clerical work. That was a surprise to me. I only worked part-time at my warehouse job, but it paid me $ 13.XX an hour, with time and a half after an 8-hour day or a 40-hour week. No matter what, you got paid for your work. That made me uneasy, but after thinking about it for a day or two, I decided that I would accept it, mainly because it was meant to be the place where I lost my training wheels and really gained some experience in the industry. Also, it was not seasonal,

The work started off quite well, with my boss, the man who interviewed me, who was quite a nice figure as a father / grandfather who seemed to want to teach me everything I needed to know, and something else. A really smart guy with a pretty decent sense of humor who showed up when you least expected him. But it had its quirks. One of them smoked cigarettes. He had resigned 27 years before our meeting, when he was in his early twenties or early twenties like me at the time. He was a cigarette Nazi. You know what I mean. More incorrigible than any existing nonsmoker, these ex-smokers need to inform everyone that they quit smoking, that they hate tobacco, that it has no place in their lives or yours. Despite being a smoker, I can respect that, up to a point. I never, never smoked in the work vehicle, nor did I have any intention of doing so, but it reminded me a few times not to smoke in that truck. It's fine I understand it. I'm a smoker, new to the company, I need to earn my trust and respect. But that escalated to 'Listen, buddy, I really don't like the smell of smoke on the upholstery, would you mind not smoking right before getting in the truck? Annoying, but okay, I won't be smoking in the 5 minutes before we hit the road. Then this job took us about 2.5 hours away from home, enough to make you think you can do it and get home for dinner. This was a 10 or 12 hour job in a large nursing home, so it was already later than we expected, and he was smoking a cigarette as we packed things outside, knowing it was a long day and he wouldn't be around. . waiting for it to end. After we pack up, I get in the truck and before we're on the road, he starts telling me that if I keep smoking and get in HIS truck, we're going to have problems. Well, it didn't happen that day, but we did have problems.

● Apparently, I misunderstood the remittance policy of the cost of food. They only paid for food when we were "away" from the store. The shop was 35 minutes from my home, and the workplace, a major laundry expansion at a local hospital, was 25 more minutes. I sent my receipts as usual, but I was not reimbursed. They said they expected me to bring a lunch with me, which would be nice, if they had told me before I spent $ 50 on work lunches each week. Apparently they were fine with me making a 25 minute trip to the store, eating there, and then driving 25 minutes back. Lunch, which was our only typical 8-12 hour day break, was one hour, all without pay, despite being legally required to pay at least 30 minutes break each day.

● I took a road trip to Nfld. with a technician. from the company's Halifax branch. We were there for five business days of over 12 hours, plus trips, one day each way. I submitted something like 80 hours for that week's timesheet. They paid me 40. They offered no explanation for the discrepancy. He literally paid me 40 hours, and I figured I just wouldn't notice or speak up if I did. When I asked the payroll person, they told me to contact the other technician, who was apparently saving the "real" timesheets. Presenting mine was a useless exercise from the beginning, they were delivering their own schedules, regardless of what I presented myself. He told me something about deducting an hour each day for unpaid lunches, but I only deducted 30 minutes on my sheets, which implies that I was trying to modify my hours. To which I replied that in any shift from 8 to 12 hours, the employer, in the province of NS, must pay for at least 30 minutes in the break time, and since lunch was our only break, I expected to be paid half. her. I think he agreed with that, but he was very happy to remind me that the company doesn't actually pay overtime money.

● You did not give me my benefits package after 3 months, as promised. When I called the owner to give him my final notice, he said, "Well, some employees use their spouse's benefits and we didn't know if he would want them" when I told him that was just one of several problems I was having with the company.

● I was forced to use an oxy / acetaline torch in the field despite knowing absolutely nothing about how to use them, except that they explode very easily, which is why you are supposed to use brass tools around them. Minimizes the possibility of sparks from metal-to-metal contact. We had no bronze tools.

I would later tell the board of arbitrators in my Emoyment Insurance appeal that the landlord was aware of my marital status at the Christmas party, when he asked me point-blank if I was dating, which I was not. He knew my situation, but he was stingy when it came to his business costs. He had a beautiful custom-built waterfront home, BMW SUV for business trips, but always short on supplies. When they asked why I didn't raise the issue at the time, I told them that all the other things I had seen happen there, and my personal introversion leads me to avoid confrontation. Besides, it was his promise, not mine. When they asked me why I quit, I am the way I did, just a week in advance, I told them that my union job safe, but seasonal, I was going to end and that I was in danger of losing my seniority if I didn't return to work early. later.

They agreed, and my original denial of benefits was reversed and I was awarded my EI claim, which was a lump sum of $ 2000, plus the remaining time on the claim.

That was one of the hardest tests of my life. I went there thinking I was trading the entire bottom line of corporate nonsense hunting and the inner politics of a large union shop for a simple mom and dad business style of work. What I got was a pay cut and a pretty good screwdriver set. He went from a fresh start to daily anxiety in 4 months. I stopped smoking sometime in my fifth or sixth month there.

The guy who hired me was a pretty solid guy, despite his hatred for the smell of burning tobacco. If he was the only person I had to deal with there, I could have stayed. He was really trying to transfer hundreds of machine models and thousands of components from his brain to mine, and that's the only reason I felt guilty about abandoning them.

Moral of the story:

Sometimes the devil you know IS the lesser of two evils.

or

Never change a "yes" to a "maybe".

I had spoken to the in-house recruiter a couple of days before about the position on the phone, she seemed adorable and spoke well about the company and the job. She had asked me to come in for an interview with her and the hiring manager.

I came to the job interview all prepared and ready to go, I managed to get there early, even with parking difficulties. I get to the building, go inside and introduce myself to the receptionist and let her know that I'm here for the interview to which she hands me a piece of paper and sends me around the corner to fill it out.

Once I get there, I notice 4 or 5 others

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I had spoken to the in-house recruiter a couple of days before about the position on the phone, she seemed adorable and spoke well about the company and the job. She had asked me to come in for an interview with her and the hiring manager.

I came to the job interview all prepared and ready to go, I managed to get there early, even with parking difficulties. I get to the building, go inside and introduce myself to the receptionist and let her know that I'm here for the interview to which she hands me a piece of paper and sends me around the corner to fill it out.

Once I get there I realize there are 4 or 5 other people sitting down with the same paperwork, however I fill out the paperwork and hand it over to the receptionist who tells me to take a seat and they will come to see me. but it's done in the order of when you got here ...

Now I never found out that it was a group interview, so I was very irritated about it, but what really bothered me is that I had been asked to come in at 10:00 for which I was still 10 minutes before, and I would. Now I have to wait for 4 other people to be interviewed before me. I just told the receptionist that I needed something from my car and left without returning.

I then emailed the internal recruiter telling her how unprofessional it was from them, but never got a response.

A completely separate incident that I was interviewing for a startup, so young. They were all dressed casually, which was something he could have accepted.

Anyway I waited for the hiring manager to come see me, we walked into an office for the interview and the first thing I noticed, which made me completely, was the fact that he was chewing gum, and not even subtly. I thought it was so disrespectful and unprofessional that I knew there was nothing he could say to make me change my mind about not wanting to work there. The interview continued, but I knew it was a waste of time, so I didn't spend a lot of time on the answers I gave and didn't ask any questions at the end of the interview. Keeping this in mind throughout the interview, he leaned back in his chair, dirty shoes on the edge of the desk.

Horrible, couldn't have been happier to go down those stairs and out of the building.

Imagine being a few months away from turning twenty-five, five years old in a job in Aerospace Manufacturing Quality Control, without a college degree or higher education (high school diploma only), and updating the resume on your account in fact just to see if get any bite.

Now imagine getting an email from the Tesla Gigafactory saying they were considering you for a position at their facility. I didn't apply for the job. He had not asked for updates on job openings. All because I never thought I'd be good enough to work for a big-name company.

To say the least, he was stunned and very excited. I c

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Imagine being a few months away from turning twenty-five, five years old in a job in Aerospace Manufacturing Quality Control, without a college degree or higher education (high school diploma only), and updating the resume on your account in fact just to see if get any bite.

Now imagine getting an email from the Tesla Gigafactory saying they were considering you for a position at their facility. I didn't apply for the job. He had not asked for updates on job openings. All because I never thought I'd be good enough to work for a big-name company.

To say the least, he was stunned and very excited. I called everyone in my family and my closest friends and told them that Tesla loved me. All while scheduling a phone interview.

I passed the phone interview and scheduled what was essentially a Skype interview. I started to get scared, because at that time I had blue hair. Not bright blue, a very pretty midnight blue, but still blue.

I called my stylist and begged him to come in before the interview and do my hair black. I called my friend and begged him to let me go to his house and use his internet, as it was stronger than mine. I went to the nines to impress these interviewers at Tesla, because they were surely much more professional men and women than I had ever worked with, but had always dreamed of working with.

The day of the interview came and I was a nervous girl who worried about the lighting and skipped dinner because she was too nervous.

...

I came out of that interview thinking, "Did I shave my legs for that?"

Mind you, I didn't actually shave my legs, but the idea was still there. I did my best to impress the two supervisors and the manager I had interviewed with, but I was very dissatisfied. Why?

Some simple things, really:

1.) Every time I answered one of their questions, they couldn't be bothered to look at the camera, not even at their computer screen. He felt very disinterested, as if what he had to say didn't matter and / or was a waste of time.

2.) One of the supervisors asked me how I would handle a situation regarding a non-conforming product, and when I replied that I would take the necessary independent steps, and then inform a superior of the situation, his response was very aggressive, “I will. I'm sorry, but did you just say you'd escalate the situation? and I stuttered over my clarification that my intention would be to inform, not to escalate. I was very intimidated and uneasy for the rest of that interview.

3.) The Quality Manager did not impress me much. He made a lot of jokes and didn't seem to take anything seriously. Usually these are good habits in a person, but it sent me a red flag because I work with quite a few people who are this way and the work is hardly done.

The whole experience was just disappointing and I wasn't impressed by the people I would be working with. Where once he was so sure he wanted this job, and was terrified that he wouldn't get it; Now I was undecided because my work experience and instincts told me to think long and hard.

In the end, what ended the dream for me was a conversation with the person who called me later that week to say they wanted to hire me. He was very arrogant, and when I explained to him that I wanted a little more time to think about it because my current job was offering me a position that he had proposed to create with the company, his response was: “Yes, I guess you have to. decide if you will stay where you are and give up the opportunity to work for Tesla or move forward in your life. "

That phrase left me feeling bad, was I really supposed to ignore the fact that I could end up unhappy and thousands of miles from any family throughout my career? Was he condemning me to do a trick on my career by even considering the path that didn't include Tesla? Was I becoming homeless, poor, and loveless later in life?

I didn't get over those thoughts until I spoke to some friends, and they reminded me that Tesla had looked for me because they saw something valuable and that there would be others who saw the same or similar. So, I emailed Tesla the next day, thanked them for their time and interest in me, and declined their offer.

I do not regret.

I don't know if it can be described as an “interview”.

I only vaguely remember the details, but I was looking for a summer job and there was an ad for a customer service position with an energy supplier, and it seemed pretty legit to me. I requested it and they gave me a time and place to meet.

The first clue that something was wrong was when I saw the place: about a hundred seats installed in a hotel conference room. They asked me to take a seat. Then, in increasing numbers, others began to arrive. I almost left then, but I really wanted a job and wasn't sure if this

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I don't know if it can be described as an “interview”.

I only vaguely remember the details, but I was looking for a summer job and there was an ad for a customer service position with an energy supplier, and it seemed pretty legit to me. I requested it and they gave me a time and place to meet.

The first clue that something was wrong was when I saw the place: about a hundred seats installed in a hotel conference room. They asked me to take a seat. Then, in increasing numbers, others began to arrive. I was about to leave but really wanted a job and wasn't sure if it was some kind of preliminary thing before the actual interviews.

Things I remember that raised the alarm include:

  1. The presentation begins with the recruiter asking everyone who wants to make money to raise their hands. At that point he began to speak about the wonders of recent deregulation.
  2. Learning it involved going door-to-door, and that payment would be on commission. Certainly a pathetic amount.
  3. Let them tell you that if you quickly showed your badge and gave it an official sounding name, people would assume you were some kind of official.
  4. Telling people that they are paying too much. Letting People Assume You Are With Their Current Service - They probably won't do anything after learning that they have signed up to switch to someone else.
  5. How to target the elderly and unemployed by going out during normal work hours - They are probably less critical and desperate to save money.

I think you get the idea. Despite my growing discomfort and disgust, I was at the point where I felt trapped to sit down during the performance rather than just getting out; yes, silly, I know, but I was young.

After that, they made people line up to fill out income tax forms. At that moment I headed straight for the door, along with a couple of other people. Sadly, many people there, who seemed a bit desperate or naive, lined up to sign.

I reported what I had just heard from a member of the provincial parliament with whom I had some connection, and never heard from that power company again.

Similar things have happened, less dramatically, more than once, where what appears to be decent work ends up being a kind of commission-seeking job. For example, do you see an ad and think you are applying for a job for a charity? Turns out, instead, you'll be working for a group of young people commissioned by the charity to find sponsors: the young people rent an office, give you flyers, clipboards and pens, leave you with your own devices (and, hey, if you decide on your own to use desperate tactics, that's up to you) and gives you a small cut of what the charity pays them. Etc. I never looked back, and instead kept looking and found jobs that actually gave me work to do and a salary to do it.

I was interviewed for a Zara sales associate position on May 10 of this year. And let me tell you I was really looking forward to the opportunity, and then I was really looking forward to being called just to clear it up and curse you to the face if I had been given the chance ...

Uh ... now that I look at it, they might have seen it coming.


First, we had a group interview attended by 12 people + managers and 2 HR representatives. They set up this online contest - and in which they asked us 10 questions about the history of Inditex - the group that owns Zara, including a few other brands.

OR

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I was interviewed for a Zara sales associate position on May 10 of this year. And let me tell you I was really looking forward to the opportunity, and then I was really looking forward to being called just to clear it up and curse you to the face if I had been given the chance ...

Uh ... now that I look at it, they might have seen it coming.


First, we had a group interview attended by 12 people + managers and 2 HR representatives. They set up this online contest - and in which they asked us 10 questions about the history of Inditex - the group that owns Zara, including a few other brands.

On the eighth question, we were asked the name of the app that Zara came up with just a month earlier. Then when the moment to respond started, a video introducing the app started. It was clearly a form of augmented reality. And the first answer was “augmented reality” when the last one was “augmented Zara”. Thinking that they are asking the name of the application and not what the technology used is called, I chose Zara Augmented and ended up giving an incorrect answer. But there were 4 more people who gave the same answer and it ended up being the most chosen even though we were all wrong.

A human resources representative asked: “This was an incorrect answer, but it is also the most selected. Those who said "D", what was your reasoning for that? ”. I took the initiative and said “the question is to ask the name of the application and not the technology used for it. So when you combine Zara and AR, Zara Augmented seems pretty reasonable to call the app. But augmented reality is technology, it doesn't sound like the name of an app. So I thought the answer was D ”.

Since I'm not an inferiority complex shove, my self-confidence shone too high and the HR rep didn't like it. There, in front of about 15 people, he made fun of me and said “look, this is what you get when you know too much”. And every fucking person in that room laughed at his "joke." Even her, herself.

I was looking at her, puzzled and trying to understand what made her do that to me. I was silent.

Then came the individual interviews and the other girl called me out of the group meeting room. When he reviewed my application form and saw that I also marked Massimo Dutti as my preferred brand to work within the Inditex group, he asked what my reasoning was. I said I worked for Victoria's Secret, which is a high-end brand here in Turkey. And MD was the highest-end brand in the Inditex group, so it would make sense for me to join their team. She insisted that VS's equivalent was Oysho and not MD. And when I told her that I was not talking about the product range, but about the budget and the class range of the brand, she looked at me with a blank and degrading face. When I said "I'm sure you know what I mean", she said "no, unfortunately not ...". And I was like, "uh ...

They ended up not hiring me and they informed me in less than 24 hours. That was a record honestly.

But they were so rude and unpleasant, even though they presented a huge company, that I couldn't wait to NOT work for Inditex and Zara.

A brand represented by those people was not worth my time and all that I could offer by being part of their team.

Those two girls' childish manners with a lot of self-confidence issues ... seeing who they trust to represent their big brand in an important interview, that's what made me not want the job. And it's a huge, huge loss for them that they have no idea about.

Several:

  1. I asked the interviewer: Why don't you have a website? I googled your specific name and it didn't show up. He told me that the site existed but it could have been on the second or third page because we don't believe in paying Google to appear on page 1. They are an event and marketing company, but they don't believe in paying for marketing! They probably don't have the budget to pay me either. Next.
  2. A company called me 15 minutes after I left their location after the interview and tried to offer me the job. You were expected to answer yes or no over the phone, without an offer letter and without being informed of what
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Several:

  1. I asked the interviewer: Why don't you have a website? I googled your specific name and it didn't show up. He told me that the site existed but it could have been on the second or third page because we don't believe in paying Google to appear on page 1. They are an event and marketing company, but they don't believe in paying for marketing! They probably don't have the budget to pay me either. Next.
  2. A company called me 15 minutes after I left their location after the interview and tried to offer me the job. He was expected to answer yes or no over the phone, without an offer letter, and without being informed of what the hours of work, salary or benefits would be for the employees. I gave them the benefit of the doubt and asked the hr girl to email me the information. The email came in stating some vague details and again, pressing for a response asap. Serious red flags. Later, a friend told me that they had friends who had worked there and had to log unpaid overtime every day, contrary to the boss's claims that this was a place of work-life balance. Next.
  3. To contain my anxiety about going home (my mom was taking care of my newborn with just a bottle of expressed milk because it was supposed to be a short interview) and I started gathering my documents, indicating that I wanted to leave. I sent an email withdrawing my application when I got home. Zero respect for personal time. They also claimed to have several big fashion brands under their belt, but the staff admitted that this is not actually the case. Wtf?

The last one left the worst aftertaste. Remembering him angers me at the way he felt entitled to take so much of my time without bothering to ask if I had anything on, hoping I'd be happy to join this rigged company that lacks the proper structure, and that I should. be happy to work after hours. Lunatic, that one.

I went for an interview for a position as a therapist at a large school for preschoolers with special needs. The head therapist confused the days and thought it was scheduled for the next day. Luckily for me. This was a sideways move, but I considered it as the agency I was currently with was in the process of selling.

While sitting in the lobby / reception area I could see different kinds of preschoolers moving into the gym, auditorium, music room, etc. I realized that if there were, say, 15-18 children in the class, there were 9-10 adults. : teacher, assistant teachers, Paras and I guess volunteers

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I went for an interview for a position as a therapist at a large school for preschoolers with special needs. The head therapist confused the days and thought it was scheduled for the next day. Luckily for me. This was a sideways move, but I considered it as the agency I was currently with was in the process of selling.

While sitting in the lobby / reception area I could see different kinds of preschoolers moving into the gym, auditorium, music room, etc. I realized that if there were, say, 15-18 children in the class, there were 9-10 adults. : teacher, assistant teachers, Paras and I suppose volunteers. This was a big red flag screaming that there were a lot of behavior problems. I saw class after class traveling this way. Although I did not see any collapse, outbreak, and in general things seemed civilized and orderly, but the question arose: why so many adults?

I went in and interviewed the lead therapist, she gave me the summary of the reports, and if a child in my program was absent, I would have to see a child from another absent therapist's case group. In other words, you would never have a break working all the time. This is a red flag on fire. There were other flags and while we were talking I was saying inside, I don't want this job. In the end, I thanked him and told him I needed to sleep and would let him know tomorrow.

Don't get me wrong, I liked the head therapist, I thought I could learn a lot working with her, but deep in my heart I didn't want to get used to a new set of behaviors, I already knew my children in my current job, there is no need to meet new children.

I emailed the therapist the kindest rejection letter thanking her for the interview and consideration and told her maybe in the future. The scout asked 50 questions about why I didn't take the position. (I hate being asked why. Question my judgment.) Was it the money, the location, etc.? She would never understand. I didn't say any of the above, thanked him and hung up the phone. She called back several times but I let him go to voicemail.

I went back to my current job and saw my troublesome cherubs with new eyes. At least there weren't that many behavior problems in comparison. I was able to set my schedule accordingly and just had to deal with my case load and no one else's, like some kind of therapeutic conveyor belt.

I have some examples.

Work 1:

  1. The job specification was a shopping list (but there was one part that interested me).
  2. The interviewers were late.
  3. I was first interviewed by an HR person - useless standard script questions. The interview was 1 hour long and this part took 20 minutes (since she was 10 minutes late).
  4. Then I had to wait for the relevant interviewers for the next 10 minutes.
  5. In general they weren't prepared, it was like a messy chat. At some point they told me that I would be reporting on a guy who was not even invited to the interview. So I asked him how he is not here. They looked at each other and one of
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I have some examples.

Work 1:

  1. The job specification was a shopping list (but there was one part that interested me).
  2. The interviewers were late.
  3. I was first interviewed by an HR person - useless standard script questions. The interview was 1 hour long and this part took 20 minutes (since she was 10 minutes late).
  4. Then I had to wait for the relevant interviewers for the next 10 minutes.
  5. In general they weren't prepared, it was like a messy chat. At some point they told me that I would be reporting on a guy who was not even invited to the interview. So I asked him how he is not here. They looked at each other and one of them said in surprise 'ah, that's a good question, why isn't he here?'
  6. The position was a data analyst and I got questions for a database developer and a business analyst, and when I questioned it they told me I won't do any of this, it's just questions.
  7. In general, I couldn't figure out what he was doing, but I finally managed to get some answers (they contradicted each other) and realized that they were not looking for a data analyst but a data architect. We spent 30 minutes due to that messy interview.
  8. It's pretty funny, even if I questioned and challenged them, they offered me a job. I declined the offer on the grounds that the job specification is misleading and they are looking for a data architect, not a data analyst. I got phone calls all day trying to pressure me to take this job with lots of promises (big red flag: no means no), etc. data architect job. Also, since I didn't have a job at the time, I thought that I can always take this job and keep looking for something better.

And now reality checks after accepting this job knowing that I shouldn't have:

  1. When I met my supervisor, it was clear that we would not get along, as he was a terrible micromanager and had no idea about databases; that's why the project was in a terrible state. So generally they wanted to find someone who could fix the problem and they probably didn't want him in the interview as someone is unlikely to get along with him. No one could even tell me what the status of the project was and everyone was free the day I started, except for one person who was leaving.
  2. I tried to figure out as much as I could and realized they needed a data architect as the data warehouse was a total disaster. I tried to get through to the guy who interviewed me (he was on Thursday) because my supervisor was out again and generally not listening to me. The guy who interviewed me was angry that I dared to waste my time when I tried to explain to him that it is not the job I applied for and that I do not have the skills. And that there is no data warehouse. The answer was more or less that when I signed the contract now I have to move on.
  3. I resigned the next day; I emailed him because again it was the WFH and then he called everyone but me. He just didn't take it seriously. So I sent him another one hoping that they would let me go if I try to sort it out amicably. He finally called me and was trying to convince me not to give the warning and then he would go when they found someone new. They would not have. I insisted and resigned. They wanted to force me to deliver the notice (4 weeks!) But I started challenging the micromanager and he wanted to get rid of me ASAP. So they found someone and first he thought he would use my 4 weeks but I defied his decisions and he couldn't bear it and he just let me go.

If I hadn't resigned myself, I could have still been there;). Anyway, I had tendencies not to fully trust my instincts, especially if it was a reputable company, after this experience when I see these kinds of red flags, I run away. The company was as messy as the interview, where they should behave in the best way. So I'm glad I took this job and was able to compare it to my predictions. He agreed.

Other examples:

The hiring manager once told me that there is usually a technical lead on the project and generally I cannot question his decisions and I have to do what he tells me and not question the technical design.

Also a terrible interview where the guy didn't look at me most of the time, when he did, it felt more like someone giving him feedback to look at a person he talks to and that he remembered from time to time. This interview was full of impersonal questions and felt like an interrogation. In addition, he does not believe that there can be any other point of view than his own or that of the company.

In another interview, 2 managers, I asked a question for one of them to set priorities, somehow, who should I listen to, and they seemed confused and started arguing with each other. It sounded like a disaster, but I couldn't get a job because of this question, I got some pretty negative feedback. Anyway, I didn't want this job after seeing that mess.

In general, when interviewers start talking to each other as if you are not there and discuss the answer to your question, it is a red flag: it happened to me a few times and there are usually no clear roles or responsibilities. Otherwise, one of them would respond and the other would not need to argue.

I think I get better reading these kinds of red flags, the more experience I have. Also, when you know what you like or dislike, what you can put up with, and what is a deal breaker, you will be much better at reading these types of signs.

I experienced several interviews that indicated that the employer would not be a healthy place to work:

I interviewed more agencies than I can recall that they simply had zero diversity, no one over the age of 21 (except agency owners), and quite open about their zero tolerance for diversity. I have seen all the women's agencies, where there were no male employees and all the employees were in their early twenties; all male agencies where no one over the age of twenty was employed; and most do not have anyone with a disability or who is not white. This seems to be the norm, sadly, with

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I experienced several interviews that indicated that the employer would not be a healthy place to work:

I interviewed more agencies than I can recall that they simply had zero diversity, no one over the age of 21 (except agency owners), and quite open about their zero tolerance for diversity. I have seen all the women's agencies, where there were no male employees and all the employees were in their early twenties; all male agencies where no one over the age of twenty was employed; and most do not have anyone with a disability or who is not white. This seems to be the norm, sadly, in most agencies.

I was in interviews where I was asked to do "spec" work (essentially writing an e-book or creating a website for free), they asked me very personal illegal questions; treated in a very disrespectful manner (such as agency owners who get up and leave while you are talking or checking your emails or calendar); I did not say things that I knew were not real about the company (which is quite common).

There have been interviews where the agency founders / owners clearly had no idea of ​​the technical needs of a position and were basically reading lists of what they thought the position should require (very common); been to open houses / casting auditions / "farming" events where staff were openly drunk or even passed out on couches.

Ultimately, companies and businesses reflect the personality of whoever sits on top, and not all companies are good employers. Many have mountains of debt and are backed by "legacy" accounts that, if they go elsewhere, can sink an agency overnight. Many non-agency employers allow unhealthy work environments. You have to trust your instincts and know what you offer.

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