What did you do when you were suddenly fired from a job?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Kian Cox



What did you do when you were suddenly fired from a job?

He immediately called the police and waited for them to arrive.

I was the manager of the highest ranking gas station in the city where I lived at the time. When Chevron (owners of Texaco) sold all of its stations in the early 2000s to private buyers, mine was particularly contested by potential buyers.

Eventually a racist Sri Lankan gentleman won the bidding war and took over. According to the laws of the time, all our jobs were safe, since labor regulations established that our contracts would continue as they began with the same terms, conditions and salary.

He didn't like that. Not a bit.

Our station wa

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He immediately called the police and waited for them to arrive.

I was the manager of the highest ranking gas station in the city where I lived at the time. When Chevron (owners of Texaco) sold all of its stations in the early 2000s to private buyers, mine was particularly contested by potential buyers.

Eventually a racist Sri Lankan gentleman won the bidding war and took over. According to the laws of the time, all our jobs were safe, since labor regulations established that our contracts would continue as they began with the same terms, conditions and salary.

He didn't like that. Not a bit.

Our station was between 2 drug shelters, so even though it was a very small store, every inch was covered by at least 3 cameras. This included the warehouse, office, and behind the checkout area.

The new owner stopped selling the groceries we had in stock and opted for much cheaper, foreign alternatives to cheaper cash and to-go. These things made the supermarket's own brand stuff look like michelin star gourmet food, it really was that bad.

Very quickly, his earnings went down, not just a little, but plummeted. Naturally, this had nothing to do with their poor decisions, but with the staff stealing money from the safe. I, as a manager, was responsible for my staff and the security of the expropriations, so I was fired and told to expect a visit from the police, as I had evidence that I was robbing him.

Now it wasn't impossible to steal from our store, but it was impossible to steal without being caught on very good quality CCTV. The images and videos it captured were kept off-site and while we had the ability to view it and burn it to disk if the police needed it, the only thing we couldn't do was delete it.

Since I did not feel like a surprise visit from the police to my house in front of my colleagues and neighbors, I stood on the edge of the esplanade and called them myself. He had a good relationship with the police and had a direct line due to the number of times we called them from where we were located. Some agents happened to pass by and stopped and asked me for details. I told them that I had just been fired for stealing a large amount of cash and that their colleagues would receive a report from the station owner shortly. Then I told them that I could definitely prove that I hadn't stolen anything. We entered the station and one officer asked the owner some questions while the other waited with me at the other end of the store.

I pointed out all the camera locations to the cop who was with me and told them the field of view of each one. It was clear to him that every inch of the tent was covered. I also pointed out the 6 cameras behind the counter guarding the store and checkout area, again pointing out what each could see.

I told him about external storage and showed him the CCTV system in the office, showing that there was no way to delete content.

I then challenged the new owner to show a single painting of me or my staff stealing money from the safe. Could not. I pressed it a little more firmly: if the money went down because we were stealing, it would be on cctv. Show it to me and the police officers in the office so they can do their job and arrest me.

I left as a free man. :)

EDIT:. As many people have asked me, I would like to add that I did not go without a job. I took my old boss to Labor Court and won a decent pay for wrongful termination. There was no way he would have accepted the job again anyway. He didn't even bother to appear in court, so I won by default.

In fact, I have never been fired in my entire life (knock on wood) or relieved for good cause in the army, although there was a time when I was "involuntarily transferred" when new officers appeared on the ship and there were too many people. for the billets available. I stayed on the job as an "administrative assistant" to the chief engineer, essentially with no responsibilities, but made it a major role as an "administrative engineering officer" that, to this day, is on my resume as a human resources manager of a department with almost fifty people.

But I digress. There was a

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In fact, I have never been fired in my entire life (knock on wood) or relieved for good cause in the army, although there was a time when I was "involuntarily transferred" when new officers appeared on the ship and there were too many people. for the billets available. I stayed on the job as an "administrative assistant" to the chief engineer, essentially with no responsibilities, but made it a major role as an "administrative engineering officer" that, to this day, is on my resume as a human resources manager of a department with almost fifty people.

But I digress. There was a time when I was almost fired and, thank God, it didn't happen, for the owner of the company. I worked in a Greek restaurant in college that was essentially a clothing store. Waiters worked 12-14 hour shifts with 16 hours not unknown. Very few breaks, and the owner was an old Greek immigrant who hated kids in college. He called us "good-for-nothing college kids" and was known to walk into the restaurant on a quiet night and arbitrarily fire all the teenagers and college students who worked there during the summer break.

Now one night my number came up. I was working a somewhat slow night and this owner was there, watching me from the restaurant bar. After an hour, he gestured to the night manager and snapped across his throat and then pointed at me, which was his way of telling the manager to fire someone. The manager came over a few minutes later and said that they had seen me yawning and that it was serious. He liked me and he didn't want to say the word "fired," but he knew that I knew what was going on. I think I wanted me to go smoothly.

Without getting angry, I simply told him that I had been working for 11 hours with a fifteen minute break and that if he was talking about firing someone for yawning, that was a serious violation of labor laws and could get the restaurant in a lot of trouble. The manager also knew that my family had connections to a well-known local attorney, through conversations we had had about a lawsuit my family filed when I was in high school for a car accident. The point is, he knew he wasn't kidding.

The manager returned to the owner and they had a long, low-voiced conversation. Then the owner left and there was no more talk of firing me. I worked there for two more summers and a winter break until I graduated.

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