What did you do to get a job at Google?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Omar Norris



What did you do to get a job at Google?

I found a few jobs listed on google.com/jobs that seemed suitable for me and applied. For several of them, I received notes from recruiters thanking me for applying but telling me I didn't fit enough, but for two of them the recruiters called and chatted, then scheduled interviews, which eventually led to a job offer.

All jobs available to external candidates are advertised on google.com/jobs, and no one is hired who does not apply there. References from Google employees can help, but you or they will still apply for one of the jobs that are advertised there. There is not

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I found a few jobs listed on google.com/jobs that seemed suitable for me and applied. For several of them, I received notes from recruiters thanking me for applying but telling me I didn't fit enough, but for two of them the recruiters called and chatted, then scheduled interviews, which eventually led to a job offer.

All jobs available to external candidates are advertised on google.com/jobs, and no one is hired who does not apply there. References from Google employees can help, but you or they will still apply for one of the jobs that are advertised there. There is no "secret" way of entry.

A note about employee references: If you want a reference from an employee, be sure to ask for a referral before applying for any job; they can add their opinions about your application and why it should be hired to your package, but only if they send the referral before you apply; If you apply on your own first, you will be alone.

Are employee references helpful? Of course, but only if the Googler really knows you and your work well enough to compare it to Google's standards and vouch for you. A strong employee recommendation is taken very seriously in the Google hiring process. However, if it's just someone you met at a party, the reference won't help much.

Google recruited me. They needed a team built around the things he was good at going public. Their preliminary Sarbanes-Oxley audit found a material deficiency, that engineers could bring their own code into production. Their solution was to create a version engineering team to bridge the gap they had to create between development and production.

I was surprised that the engineer who made my phone's display was more interested in my experience building a software compliance testing process than my technical knowledge. My role and that of the team was to design release processes that were compliant with regulations.

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Google recruited me. They needed a team built around the things he was good at going public. Their preliminary Sarbanes-Oxley audit found a material deficiency, that engineers could bring their own code into production. Their solution was to create a version engineering team to bridge the gap they had to create between development and production.

I was surprised that the engineer who made my phone's display was more interested in my experience building a software compliance testing process than my technical knowledge. My role and that of the team was to design release processes that conform to regulatory rules and best engineering practices, create software to implement those processes, and provide hands-on support for the release.

The provider found me through the Perforce user mailing list. I decided to learn the details of Perforce by learning the answer to every question that was asked on the list, which gave me a way to show both my technical knowledge and my ability to explain things.

One of my teammates made an excellent career move by convincing Mark Zuckerberg that Facebook needed to apply some kind of discipline to its pitches, and that he could build it.

Very simple in my case. Google was a place that I thought would be a good fit, it had people I wanted to work with and tons of cool data in my field of interest. I was going to graduate in a year, Google came to campus to interview me, I signed up. I did well at the campus interview, came to Mountain View for the on-site, did well, and got an offer.

Once I had that in hand, I decided not to apply to any place that wasn't at least that good, which at the time meant there were no other industry jobs (in hindsight, a bad idea: if I had other offers, Google would have given me more stock options

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Very simple in my case. Google was a place that I thought would be a good fit, it had people I wanted to work with and tons of cool data in my field of interest. I was going to graduate in a year, Google came to campus to interview me, I signed up. I did well at the campus interview, came to Mountain View for the on-site, did well, and got an offer.

Once I had that in hand, I decided not to apply to any place that wasn't at least that good, which at the time meant there were no other industry jobs (in hindsight, a bad idea: if I had other offers, Google would have given me more stock options), so I applied for assistant professor positions at top schools. Unsurprisingly, I didn't get those (very tough competition), so I accepted Google's offer.

In general, I recommend this type of approach for new doctors, it was almost stress-free because I had a good job offer in the early fall, even before the academic job application process started.

I did well in the interviews, I think that's the main thing I had to do.

To get an interview, I don't really know what decided to interview me, but it's somewhere in the references (i.e. people already employed at Google think it would be a valuable addition, based, probably, mainly on my academic record and my organizational skills (not related to programming)) and my achievements in programming contests (which weren't the best in the world, but they weren't bad either).

I took a slightly less conventional approach. After failing to get through the final round of interviews as a Java developer several times, I started working with Salesforce, where the coding is roughly 90-95% the same as Java. The difference, as I see it, is that while the demand is still very high for Salesforce developers, the supply is MUCH lower, although the work is almost the same.

Since Google receives so many applicants, false negatives are common, and it's not unusual for successful engineers to have to apply multiple times, so don't worry if you don't sign in the first time.

I finished you

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I took a slightly less conventional approach. After failing to get through the final round of interviews as a Java developer several times, I started working with Salesforce, where the coding is roughly 90-95% the same as Java. The difference, as I see it, is that while the demand is still very high for Salesforce developers, the supply is MUCH lower, although the work is almost the same.

Since Google receives so many applicants, false negatives are common, and it's not unusual for successful engineers to have to apply multiple times, so don't worry if you don't sign in the first time.

I ended up getting a recruiting job with Google doing Salesforce development after a few years of experience that I recently turned into a full time job!

I also agree with Brittany's points, follow your passions and take opportunities when they present themselves!

I was working in the foodservice industry at the time, while in college, and was looking for an outlet. I found several internships that weren't that cool, but they gave me some work experience and connections.

Fast forward a year, someone I worked with on one of the internships happened to Google and recommended me. I went through the standard interview process (phone screen + 4-5 interviews) and was offered a position. So, in my case at least, the two most important factors are 1. demonstrating that I have relevant experience and 2. having a reference.

Urs Hölzle gave a talk on Google which I attended. I handed him my resume. I got an interview. Obviously get over the interview questions. I received an offer that I thought was a bit low (I was working for Amazon) after a bit more discussion that I accepted. The rest is history.

How can level 3 / level 4 college of engineering and arts students find themselves on Google, Facebook, Amazon, etc., etc.?

I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain position.

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I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain role. They are really smart. It's not just about your knowledge and skills, it's also about how well you perform in that position.

2 - Is the Google interview process very difficult?

Yes and No. It depends. It will depend on the interviewer, recruiter and how long the position has been open, how quickly they need someone for the position, and the skills of other candidates. Some interviewers want to hire a copy of themselves and in this case, no matter how good you are, if you don't share the same style and personality as the hiring manager, you won't get the job.

3 - Most of the time they have someone in mind for the role.

I can explain that in more detail later, but at Google they need to interview multiple people for a position. Sometimes they loved the first candidate and when you showed up for the interview they already fell in love with someone else. However, they are still obliged to interview the other candidates and sometimes they will do it very badly because they see it as a waste of time. In cases like that, you will probably walk out of the interview feeling like you won't get the job.

4 - Are you always looking to hire the best candidate?

Not always. There are a lot of insider recommendations for roles, and unless the person someone referred you is really bad and you're incredibly good at what you do, chances are you won't get the role.

Google is the company where I saw the highest number of Googlers friends, husbands, wives, boyfriends, girlfriends, brothers and sisters hired. In my team, at least 25% of the people have a family member or someone very close who works at Google.

5 - Heart rate can be very lazy

You have to think in terms of supply and demand to understand the recruitment process at Google. They have hundreds, sometimes thousands of people applying for a position on Google. They don't need to scout for talent (although most of the time they do), they already have millions of people wanting to work for them.

For that reason, recruiters are sometimes really disorganized and don't care much about you and can't send you enough information that you will need to perform well in the interview.

But that is not the rule. I believe that most of the time they do a decent job and in their defense they receive thousands of applications a month, 95% of the time from people who are not suitable for the position.

6 - You need to be lucky

I have a friend at Google who said that his technical interview questions were very similar to the questions he had been practicing in a book on technical interview questions. He was fortunate to be prepared to answer all the questions correctly and faster. I know another guy who is really normal, but who worked with a Googler at an agency and when a position became available they recommended him for the position.

You have to keep in mind that the hiring process in Google is not perfect. I think there is a lot of decision-making power in the hiring manager's hand.

7 - There are many average people

One thing you hear a lot during your first few months at Google is about imposter syndrome. Google has amazing people working for them and some of the brightest people I had the pleasure of working with I met at Google. However, there are also many average people. What you don't see is anyone below average. Everyone has at least enough skills to do a reasonable job. I think Google is good at providing a fertile environment for personal growth. It also challenges you to keep improving, but still, there are some folks who are happy enough to be on Google and not worried about improvement.

8 - Non-technical roles

Non-technical roles are the most difficult because it is difficult to establish the correct success metrics for a candidate. Technical roles are easier because 70% of the process is to show that you have great skills and your methods to solve a problem.

When it comes to non-technical roles it is very easy to get a false positive. It's not hard to cheat the process if you're really good at interviewing or the hiring manager isn't very skilled either. I worked for a large, well-known company where the team leader was not really trained and unprepared for his role, but his manager (the department director) was also untrained and unprepared. So if you're applying for a position where hiring managers are bad at what they do, chances are they will hire someone just as bad as they are. In my case, I was hired because someone else with great influence in the company decided that I was the right candidate.

9 - Googleness

You hear a lot about Googleness, but I think that as long as you don't do something really awkward or unprofessional during the interview, Googleness isn't that important. Googleness is a "metric" that shows how apt you are to work in the Google environment.

Got a job at Google twice. I had to go through full cycles of Software Engineering interviews both times. I worked there for the first time between 2006 and 2012. I recently returned in February 2017.

If you knew me from my upbringing, you could consider me "normal":

  • I grew up in a small house in the woods in a semi-rural town at the end of a gravel road. My parents and a brother still live in that house. Until I was a teenager, there was an RV on the property that faced the street. I used to run barefoot through the woods and catch snakes and frogs to entertain myself.
  • I have a 100% public school educa
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Got a job at Google twice. I had to go through full cycles of Software Engineering interviews both times. I worked there for the first time between 2006 and 2012. I recently returned in February 2017.

If you knew me from my upbringing, you could consider me "normal":

  • I grew up in a small house in the woods in a semi-rural town at the end of a gravel road. My parents and a brother still live in that house. Until I was a teenager, there was an RV on the property that faced the street. I used to run barefoot through the woods and catch snakes and frogs to entertain myself.
  • I have a 100% public school education from elementary school to university. K-12 was all in Louisiana, a state consistently ranked in the lowest 5 states in the United States for quality of public education, literacy, obesity, teen pregnancy, incarceration rate, etc.
  • Neither of my parents had prestigious professions. My father has a semester of college education and is self-employed. My mother is a retired public school teacher with a degree in education from the University of New Orleans. Each of them valued education and instilled in me the value of hard work.
  • There is no wealth in my family tree. Just ordinary middle-class working people. I am the first in my family to leave the state for education or employment. In fact, I am the first man in my paternal line who has not been incarcerated in his life. (But hey, there's still time, right?)
  • As a child, my friend's father, who worked in a managerial position at a Fortune 500 company, took me and his son to a monster truck rally to which he got free tickets. This is where I think the professionals in my community placed me because of my education: red collar. The trucks were really big and very loud, but they are not what inspired me to become an engineer.
  • I spent my teenage summers working with my father cleaning carpets to save enough money for my first car. I spent some of that money building a computer and buying a broadband internet connection for our home (this was in the mid 90's).
  • I have a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from Texas A&M, which is in the top 50 computer science schools in the nation. Certainly not Ivy League. It was the best school I could afford.
  • I paid my own way through college with the help of a modest scholarship. I did not join a fraternity, study abroad, or get involved with student government or other social clubs. I did an internship at Hewlett-Packard and IBM.
  • My college GPA was 3.4. Not bad, but far from exceptional. I think I got a 3.6 GPA in Computer Science courses with a C in Algorithms and a C in Operating Systems.
  • Despite working at major tech companies for over a decade, I still have trouble "fitting in" socially. I enjoy fishing, hunting, and professional soccer, which I don't generally speak to at the office. I attend church every Sunday. I have no idea what the latest menswear is. Never has.

Aside from finishing college, I think I have more in common with the average American than the average Silicon Valley citizen.

So to answer your question: yes. A normal person can get a job at Google. (Sometimes twice, which shows it's not random or fluke, right?) A normal person can also get jobs at Facebook, Amazon, and Microsoft (I've received offers from all of these). A normal person can also rise to the top. start-ups (I've worked at elite VC-backed companies in their early stages and most recently on Pinterest). Yes, these companies are littered with Ivy League graduates and top engineering schools. They don't know what to think of me, but they certainly respect my work.

A normal person can get these jobs, but they will have to work harder to get the chance. A normal person will not have an extremely successful and educated family that encourages them to excel in school. No one is going to pay for SAT tutoring and college application consulting. Not having connections with alumni means that it is more difficult to get into prestigious institutions. Not having family money means having to choose public schools over private ones. An average state school means that major companies cannot hire staff from that campus. A normal person will lack the family connections to obtain internship opportunities and guaranteed interview spaces at major companies.

As a normal person, the opportunities are still there. It's just that no one catches their eye. Or if they do, they imply that you are unlikely to be able to take advantage of those opportunities. The opportunities are still there. YOU need to find them. YOU need to get hold of them. To do that, you will have to put in a lot of effort.

"Hard work" means different things for different income levels. Where I grew up, it meant something like showing up every day on time no matter what and doing dirty work without complaining. For a couple of doctors' children, "hard work" may mean earning the final degree in their profession of choice, becoming a fair but tough employer, negotiating the things that matter, and always looking presentable and behaving in a distinguished manner.

Ironically, doing the dirty work without complaining is what led to my quick promotion within Google my first time. We'll see where it takes me this time. Google's engineering interview processes and advocacy processes don't care about how you dress, who your parents are, or what Greek organization you're affiliated with. They are a brutally honest assessment of how well you know and apply your craft.

Success can be fostered. In the absence of nurturing, a normal person can still achieve old-fashioned success. That's the very essence of the American Dream: work hard and the opportunity will come. Success can be achieved in this country no matter what your initial circumstances are. Anyone who tells you otherwise is trying to rob you.

After an extensive 2.5 month interview process and 6 Google Hangout talks (interviews), 30 minutes each, and an on-site interview, I finally got an offer as a full-time business management partner. She had no experience in the business world and only helped families for whom she worked with experience in cosmetics sales. My friend sent my application internally to a hiring manager; otherwise, most likely I would have missed out on over 1,000 requests. I don't have any formal qualifications other than a UX design certificate in which I took a 3 month intensive course at the General Assembly. With that said, my inte

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After an extensive 2.5 month interview process and 6 Google Hangout talks (interviews), 30 minutes each, and an on-site interview, I finally got an offer as a full-time business management partner. She had no experience in the business world and only helped families for whom she worked with experience in cosmetics sales. My friend sent my application internally to a hiring manager; otherwise, most likely I would have missed out on over 1,000 requests. I don't have any formal qualifications other than a UX design certificate in which I took a 3 month intensive course at the General Assembly. That said, all of my interviews had problem-solving questions that were quite complicated. Some were worded with such difficulty that I had to guess what they really meant. There was no way to study these questions beforehand, because they are not found online and the questions chosen are entirely up to the interviewer. They hired me based on a number of different factors, but they didn't call my references, so that didn't matter, my lack of a college degree didn't matter, and the fact that I had never worked in tech was not at all important. They saw potential in me as a problem solver, a leader, a rapidly adaptable human being, and someone who was full of leadership and entrepreneurial skills. They want every employee who works at Google to take it on as their own company. Share your ideas to improve the world, customers and business and basically feel part of something massive. They want you to be cheerful and sociable. They want it to be easy to be alone with you, but strong to stand up for your goals and aspirations. A Google Entrepreneur is what they aspire to achieve in every customer! I am a Noogler and I feel very lucky to be able to call myself an employee, but one piece of advice: be yourself, be Google and only work here if you really aspire to grow within a company and treat it like your own.

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