What could Trump do to bring a lot of high-paying manufacturing jobs back to the US Rust Belt?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Adam Lawson



What could Trump do to bring a lot of high-paying manufacturing jobs back to the US Rust Belt?

It will not. Can not. Nobody can. Globalization is not a conspiracy; it is a consequence of the world becoming more and more linked. The only thing that can bring back manufacturing is if it has a lower cost. Now, personally, I find that the arguments against regulation and taxes are so much whining from people who think like thieves. Capitalism flourishes under much stricter regulatory schemes than ours, so I don't buy their argument for a minute.

However, the things that are making manufacturing possible to recover are not creating jobs. Let's take automation. For two disappointing weeks in 2002

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It will not. Can not. Nobody can. Globalization is not a conspiracy; it is a consequence of the world becoming more and more linked. The only thing that can bring back manufacturing is if it has a lower cost. Now, personally, I find that the arguments against regulation and taxes are so much whining from people who think like thieves. Capitalism flourishes under much stricter regulatory schemes than ours, so I don't buy their argument for a minute.

However, the things that are making manufacturing possible to recover are not creating jobs. Let's take automation. For two disappointing weeks in 2002, I had a job building computers. I was fired before actually completing the training, and it turns out that internal wiring is much more difficult than you think to route. In the nearly 15 years since then, computing has moved far away from the desktop to laptops and phones; Desktop systems are the province of gamers and heavy-duty media and technical computing, and virtually everyone else has a device that is largely assembled with automation - and in the case of smartphones, they are often built with tolerances that are almost too tight for humans in the process to be dealt with. Finding a circuit board in a new, non-surface-mount device (for example, on some VCRs, for the few who still have them) is practically an anachronism these days. Pick-and-place machines and specialized ovens for certain chip packages have long replaced people sitting on a bench with soldering irons, and "building a computer" is sometimes no more complex than packing a Raspberry Pi in a box. made of plastic and plug it in. (By the way, automation is probably the only way the Raspberry Pi can be made in significant quantities in Wales, and even then, when they introduce a new model,

The other problem is the supply chain. Having tight control over a supply chain is a major incentive for relocating manufacturing facilities, but aside from some warehouse workers (also increasingly automated work) and truck drivers, it doesn't add much in terms of Job positions; in fact, it dramatically reduces capital expenditures, so not only are jobs not added, but there would be no place to put them anyway. On top of that, just-in-time inventory is cheap and efficient, but if something in the system goes wrong between supplier and distributor, the ripple effect could jeopardize many jobs that are actually there. (Actually, it's not far from how the credit crash in 2008 destroyed a number of major businesses due to their dependence on credit to do things like pay their employees). Even under favorable conditions,

What is left apart from support jobs? Just the things machines can't do: parts of the final assembly process, for example, or the shipping department, or cutting chickens in a meatpacking plant (a particularly dangerous job due to the inevitability of RSIs). Unskilled labor suffers when automation is introduced, and unskilled labor tends to suffer anyway because it means repetitive and meaningless work. A resurgent labor movement would help that a bit by pushing for changes to the process to make it less dangerous and repetitive, but local gatherings would be much smaller and limited in power. And there is always a demand for expert machinists,

There is nothing Trump can do about it. You were never in the manufacturing business and probably wouldn't know the difference between a lathe and a drill, so it's not exactly the best option for rebuilding a manufacturing economy. But more specifically, whatever the benefits of Made in the USA for manufacturers, many of the skilled jobs that people want to take back simply no longer exist. I mean, when was the last time you saw a butcher deal with an entire side of beef instead of cryovaccinated primary cuts? When was the last time you saw a blacksmith making a living doing it, rather than as a hobby? Have you seen Linotypes lately? (There are some that still work, mostly in specialty letterpress stores and a handful of newspapers around the world). There used to be a powerful bagel bakers union in New York; mass production, the non-Jewish public's desire for a less hard and chewy bagel than tradition dictated, and the freezer reduced them to next to nothing. (... thank you, Lender?)

Trump sold the Rust Belt a fantasy he cannot possibly fulfill, because the world that they believe has been stolen from them, in fact, simply no longer exists anywhere on earth.

Donald Trump will be an amazing president, the greatest job creator God gave the American people. This is how he will do it, and people will swoon at his brilliance.

  1. Take away food stamp employment benefits and housing and living subsidies from the unemployed. This will incentivize everyone to do honest work.
  2. Like Carrier, it will provide corporate wellness for large multinational companies to build plants in the rust belt, the best largest plants in the world.
  3. Hit a 40% duty on Chinese goods and a 10% duty on goods from anywhere else in the world.
  4. Force tech companies to pass
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Donald Trump will be an amazing president, the greatest job creator God gave the American people. This is how he will do it, and people will swoon at his brilliance.

  1. Take away food stamp employment benefits and housing and living subsidies from the unemployed. This will incentivize everyone to do honest work.
  2. Like Carrier, it will provide corporate wellness for large multinational companies to build plants in the rust belt, the best largest plants in the world.
  3. Hit a 40% duty on Chinese goods and a 10% duty on goods from anywhere else in the world.
  4. Force technology companies through tax incentives to occupy plants and start production.
  5. Of course, multinational tech companies work purely on the margins, so it gets tricky here.
  6. Americans will have to undertake a steep learning curve to learn the culture of this new industry, as did China. Workers will be paid $ 1.50 per hour, 11 hours a day, 6 days a week without medical attention. It will be difficult to find staff willing to make these hours for this payment, but as welfare runs out, there will be people desperate enough to accept it. And furthermore, as living costs skyrocket due to import duties, others will join.
  7. Here's the good part, with all the manufacturing jobs in the US, the government can balance its books for once, the tax money will spill out. America will become the best country in the second largest and most successful world in the world.
  8. Of course voters and politicians will complain and try to reverse their economic plans, their argument will be “I always said that I would recover jobs and strengthen our economy, what is it? What happens to you, you hired an entrepreneur, not a politician, the well-being of the workforce or the happiness of the population is not the business of an entrepreneur ”.
  9. He will eventually be ousted, but not before all of the world's developed economies stop buying American goods and services due to Trump's Great Trade Wars, the United States finally ends the economy it had in 1935, "when America was great." . Products that are manufactured to make peanuts that no one is willing to buy.
  10. The United States, like prohibition, considers it a lesson learned, and in the future people will give more votes to legislators, people with credentials in public life and people, people with experience in public policy.

This answer uses sarcasm and wit, it explains the dangers of Trump using very simplistic responses to extremely difficult geopolitical problems. It is not written to offend anyone, but to humorously report the causes and effects of hyperinflation and the Great Depression.

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