What code do I need to learn to get a job at Google?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Thomas Dixon



What code do I need to learn to get a job at Google?

If you don't have at least a master's degree in computer science or data science / machine learning or math, or equivalent knowledge or credentials, you're probably dreaming about colors. From what I've read, coding has almost nothing to do with the skills Google searches for - see the following post: Google Jobs and Careers.

I have also heard of competent coders who have developed a cutting edge piece of software used by over 100,000 users / developers, who were hired by Google for their expertise with that specific tool, often in conjunction with the acquisition of that tool itself.

To get the job done at Google, you have to be a good programmer, not (just) good at some programming language. All the big companies (Google, Microsoft, Amazon,…) are looking good… and that means that their technical skills are less important than the way of thinking and solving problems. So, google it a bit. You will have to master algorithms rather than "coding"; hate that word. There are many examples of online interviews.

But, surely, knowing a programming language can be an advantage in everything.

Piton. Javascript. C and C ++.

You don't just learn a language and end the day. You learn as much as you can, and once you get to a certain point, it all turns into syntax, as you should already have the conceptual ideas written down.

Good luck.

So I can tell you about Google, which is a Google search engine. You only need one skill: problem solving ability. At Google, we are more interested in knowing if you can tackle an "invisible" problem and if you can, then how efficient your approach is.

Second, we are interested in giving you the problem, which has a number of obstacles. This assures us that you are the right person and not a "lucky" recruit.

You must know the basic data structures, strings, etc. Again, I emphasize the basic data structures. If you are a recent graduate, I can ask you to code an avl tree or a black red tree and then apply it in some other application.

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So I can tell you about Google, which is a Google search engine. You only need one skill: problem solving ability. At Google, we are more interested in knowing if you can tackle an "invisible" problem and if you can, then how efficient your approach is.

Second, we are interested in giving you the problem, which has a number of obstacles. This assures us that you are the right person and not a "lucky" recruit.

You must know the basic data structures, strings, etc. Again, I emphasize the basic data structures. If you are a recent graduate, I can ask you to code an avl tree or black red tree and then apply it in some other app, but if you are not a recent graduate, we understand that you may not be in contact with avl or black red trees . . But still, we hope you are familiar with linked lists, stacks, queues, basic charts, basic trees, etc. I will understand that you know the basic charts but not the dijikshtra algorithm, as it is not a recent graduate or brain oxidations.

It would be nice if you could show us your skills. Create a profile, portfolio, github acc, etc. and just show us. I will get to know your skills and abilities even before you show up for the interview and it will help us both.

I don't care much what language you use, but it is advisable to select some popular language like c / c ++ / java / scala / go / python, etc. I don't know erlang, but it's fine until its syntax is understandable to me. But don't go for the language it is ... You must have understood.

Practice the code on paper. I will not give you a compiler or ide and you will be writing it on a whiteboard. We are not concerned that you are missing a semicolon in your code, but if you make a mistake in the function parameters and arguments and try to convert char to char *, we will notice. Ide gives you a direct error but not a whiteboard. Trust me, we know all kinds of compiler errors and our hands are very dirty from coding. That is why we will not miss those mistakes. We wrote tons of code without those one-time errors.

All the best!!!

Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution for the same problem and t

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Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution to the same problem and the interview concluded.

My second round online was in November 2018. If I remember correctly, it was about finding a way in a BST. We discuss the case in multiple ways, etc. and then I was able to find a semi-optimal solution. My interviewer gave me a hint and I was able to find the optimal solution and code it way ahead of time. I made it through this round and was invited for on-site interviews in London.

My on-site interviews took place in December 2018. In fact, I went to the wrong Google office in the morning! But since I left early, I had some extra time, so I ran to the right office and was able to arrive at the last minute. He was supposed to have 4 algorithmic interviews and a Googliness interview.

My first interviewer showed me the office. Then the rounds of interviews began.

For my first round I was asked a medium difficulty bit manipulation question. This round was pretty good and I was able to finish the round 5 minutes early.

For my second round they asked me a graphic question. I explained my solution and they asked me to write the code to build just the graph instead of solving the whole question. This round also went quite well.

Next, I had the googliness round. It's basically a behavioral round, so they asked me questions like what are my expectations when working at Google, what criteria do I use to prioritize projects, etc. This round was meh because I don't have a lot of work experience so I was only able to give slightly vague answers to questions. But I wasn't too worried because I think it's an experimental round that only happens in some Google offices (London is one of them).

I had my lunch break, ate light.

The third round was the hardest. It was a graphic question about permutation rings. It took me a bit of time to find the solution and I wasn't really sure about it. But the interviewer said my test was fine, so I coded it. I had 1-2 trivial errors that I fixed after the interviewer pointed them out. I think this was my strongest round as tough questions can go a long way in distinguishing algorithmic ability and my competitive programming background helped a lot here.

The fourth round was based on trees and basic probability. It was easy-medium and I was able to code without any errors so this round went well too.

After the new year I got a call from my recruiter saying that my interview scores were good enough to move on to the host search phase. In this phase, my recruiter basically tried to find a team on Google for me. I was paired with the Google Cloud team in Warsaw and got my offer in April.

As you can see, most of my rounds were based on data structures and algorithms, so my experience in programming competition helped a lot in clearing these rounds.

I recommend that you start entering coding contests right away. To get started, look at some of my answers:

Sameer Gulati's answer to How should I get started in competitive programming?

Sameer Gulati's answer to What made you good at competitive programming?

About 2-3 months before the interview, switch to troubleshooting at Leetcode, CareerCup, etc. to gain experience in solving interview problems. Having a little experience in competitive programming will make solving these problems much easier for you.

Applying for a position at Google (engineering or otherwise) is relatively easy - getting that first interview is the hardest part. Fewer than 1-2% of applicants get telephone interviews, and only one-tenth of all applicants selected by phone get one on the spot.

But to answer your question, how do you apply?

  1. Google Careers -> Go to Google Careers and search for the specific job you want to apply for. Remember to filter as much as possible; Right now, there are over 2,500 software engineering jobs available, but looks can be deceiving. How many of those are already full? How many of them are not based on the co
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Applying for a position at Google (engineering or otherwise) is relatively easy - getting that first interview is the hardest part. Fewer than 1-2% of applicants get telephone interviews, and only one-tenth of all applicants selected by phone get one on the spot.

But to answer your question, how do you apply?

  1. Google Careers -> Go to Google Careers and search for the specific job you want to apply for. Remember to filter as much as possible; Right now, there are over 2,500 software engineering jobs available, but looks can be deceiving. How many of those are already full? How many of them are not based in the country where you want to work? How many of those software engineering roles are specifically tailored to your skills and experiences? Considering factors like these, there will be a few select positions that you will focus on.
  2. References -> As with any company, having references from current full-time employees will always help you get interviews. If you can't get an internal referral, find an employee who may be interested in a specific skill you possess. If they think you are a good fit for their team, they will connect you with a suitable recruiter. Conference websites, forums, LinkedIn profiles, blog posts, Twitter feeds, Facebook posts, and even Instagram photos are good places to look.
  3. BE REMARKABLE -> There are literally 1,999 million other applicants who are just as smart / skilled as you are. So how do you stand out? Of many ways!
  • Create your own website, write or create content to increase your visibility in search engines, comment and write about events relevant to your fields of interest, engage all users (one of them could even be a recruiter) and make it easy to funnel your online presence to your website / online portfolio. This brings me to the next point ->
  • Show your technical skills -> Upload your personal projects to GitHub, Kaggle, Codepen.io, etc. Summarize your technical internships / work experiences in 2-3 points on your CV.
  • Your school and your GPA are important, but your personal projects and your work experience will take you to the top.
    • When recruiters screen potential Google employees, they look at 1) how much impact did the project have on their community? 2) Did others use it? Was it useful enough for other people to adopt it? 3) Was the project you worked on relevant to your field of interest? 4) How passionate are you about creating side projects (passion can be measured by how deeply you created them)? 5) Can Google see that their software is used in Google products?
    • In other words, your project must be truly unique, have a lot of effort invested in it, display your technical knowledge, and be valuable enough for others to use. Creating a generic chess AI or stock prediction model may not be enough.

Everyone will tell you a college degree in computer science from one of the top 10 universities.

In general, this is true.

Everyone will also say that you need some connections and a bit of luck too.

This is also true in general.

However, I want you to meet someone;

source: twitter

This is David Byttow, a UCLA college dropout who landed a job at Google as a software developer, with no degree in hand. A link to his excellent post on the experience is here.

What was your secret? How did you pass the application requirements?

source: google

It really is quite simple, and whether you have a title or not, the steps will apply to you.

  • GRAM
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Everyone will tell you a college degree in computer science from one of the top 10 universities.

In general, this is true.

Everyone will also say that you need some connections and a bit of luck too.

This is also true in general.

However, I want you to meet someone;

source: twitter

This is David Byttow, a UCLA college dropout who landed a job at Google as a software developer, with no degree in hand. A link to his excellent post on the experience is here.

What was your secret? How did you pass the application requirements?

source: google

It really is quite simple, and whether you have a title or not, the steps will apply to you.

  • Be really good at coding.

Google wants one thing: skill. Generally, a good measure of basic skill would be a title, however understand… what they want is skill.

So first of all you have to be really good at coding, the skill they want in a developer. You should have, at a minimum, a deep command of the common programming languages ​​used by Google and the industry in general to create software:

→ Python

→ Ruby

→ C, C +, C # (choose one)

→ Java

→ Other languages ​​used in web pages (HTML, SQL, etc.)

Do you have to know everything there is to know about these? No, but you need to know how to use most of them, and more importantly, know how to use them to build things with them.

  • Build things with code.

You need to have some projects on hand, which you can put on your resume, that you created using code. David, for example, built a large number of custom websites for 15 hours per hour at a web design company before working at Google.

Create an application (or 5), create some websites, create some…. thing ... a lot ... of ... things.

This is how you show your skills. This is how you hack the entry requirements in your favor.

  • Gain skills, knowledge, and recognition (certifications, course completion, badges, etc.) in areas that are not entirely within the scope of Software Development, but are useful in the field.

Google doesn't just want good software developers, it wants good developers who know how their task fits into the larger structure that is Google.

Take courses and certifications in networking, project management, bug hunting, etc. Find a way to make the skills you've acquired demonstrable, whether it's through completed projects or through certifications you've completed.

  • Big key: first try to get an entry-level technical job at a company other than Google. Get hired, work there, then try to get into Google.

Which one are you most likely to hire if it were Google? A candidate who has worked in the tech industry doing something like coding, or a candidate who has never worked in the industry?

By landing an entry-level job at a company (other than Google) with potentially looser requirements, you're awarding yourself a big + on your resume when you go to Google to apply. You are showing that you can work in technology and do a good job.

  • Above all: become a Googler before Google.

Fall in love with technology. Fall in love with how the software works, how it works, how it is built.

Get a little quirky about your love of technology. Make technology your everything (don't go crazy).

By becoming a Googler (Google employee) before you are at Google, you will be recognized as a "like-minded" before being hired. Above the strict requirements that Google imposes, they look for specific types of people. Become that type of person and you give yourself a giant advantage when you go to your interview.

Best of luck!


Did I like this? Read my other answer on how to get hired on Google here.

Just because you don't like coding doesn't mean you can't have a job at big tech companies like Google. There are more jobs that need to think, communicate fluently, manage tasks, etc. Here I list some of the domains where no or less encoding is done.

Designer: The graphic designer is a person who assembles images, motion graphics in his design and brings his creativity to real life. Google Doodle is designed by the Google Doodle team, which includes artists, designers, and creative thinkers. Note that the Doodles are designed for a larger number of events and are also location based. So creative

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Just because you don't like coding doesn't mean you can't have a job at big tech companies like Google. There are more jobs that need to think, communicate fluently, manage tasks, etc. Here I list some of the domains where no or less encoding is done.

Designer: The graphic designer is a person who assembles images, motion graphics in his design and brings his creativity to real life. Google Doodle is designed by the Google Doodle team, which includes artists, designers, and creative thinkers. Note that the Doodles are designed for a larger number of events and are also location based. So creativity is enough to survive (in my perspective).

User Interface Specialist - There are a number of roles that fall into this category. Everything is done for user interactions, how they interact with the application, the website or the program. This job needs skills like design, human-computer interaction. Use your creativity and diverse engineering experience to explore solutions to a variety of engineering problems.

Business Analyst - The business analyst works across all internal sales teams to help them achieve their business goals by striving to optimize project completion and overall process improvement. It seems that a client tells the developers their needs and the developer creates them, but there is a lot to do about it. Your requirements should be understood as a solid pattern and then the developers did their tedious part. Analyzers and conversationalists are needed for this position.

Project manager: In this position, one has to take care of the responsibilities similar to that of a business analyst along with managing the tasks, completing them on time and so on. Surfing the net can give more details than this, as I rarely do research in this field.

Technical Writer - As a technical writer working on developer products, you will write concept documentation, detailed integration and development guides, code samples, API references, and tutorials for in-house developers. So if you are good at your writing skills and you say the content in a way that people can easily understand about that particular project, then you can get a job.

And finally, having at least a basic understanding of programming principles can go a long way, but for most of these jobs, you won't need to know more than the basics. This answer is based entirely on the analysis performed. You can find more than this on the internet.

If you spent your valuable time reading my answer and you really find it useful, just hit the Upvote button somewhere below this answer.

I will answer by taking into account the point of view of a cooler CS with the goal of a job in a high-tech company. In case you are facing interviews soon, feel free to jump to the end of the answer.

Most of my advice is based on the interviews I have faced (specifically, Microsoft, Google, and Uber). The plan provided here helped me clarify your interviews, I hope you find it helpful as well. We can divide the preparation stage into approximately four stages.

Building the foundation:

  • The first step is to become familiar with a programming language. I would recommend Python because of its flexibility and compatibility with the library.
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I will answer by taking into account the point of view of a cooler CS with the goal of a job in a high-tech company. In case you are facing interviews soon, feel free to jump to the end of the answer.

Most of my advice is based on the interviews I have faced (specifically, Microsoft, Google, and Uber). The plan provided here helped me clarify your interviews, I hope you find it helpful as well. We can divide the preparation stage into approximately four stages.

Building the foundation:

  • The first step is to become familiar with a programming language. I would recommend Python because of its flexibility and compatibility with the library, which makes it much easier to get started with different projects. Here are some links to get started,
    • Google Python class
    • Coursera: Introduction to Python Programming
  • The next step focuses on your theoretical foundations. Be on the lookout for foundational computer science courses taught at your university. In case you don't have access to your college courses, try these equally beneficial alternatives.
    • Udacity: Introduction to Computer Science
    • Coursera: Algorithms - Part 1
    • MIT: Introduction to Algorithms
  • Pay particular attention to data structures and standard algorithms and focus on standard algorithmic paradigms, including greedy algorithms, dynamic programming, divide and conquer, etc.

Explore multiple fields:

After concentrating on your fundamentals, you should now start to dive into a few core topics. This stage would involve taking part in advanced courses and carrying out various projects.

  • Start exploring different fields, below are some required courses for a CS graduate offered.
    • Coursera: Machine Learning - Stanford University
    • Udacity: Introduction to Operating Systems
    • Stanford Online: Compilers
  • In the meantime, keep working on side projects as they give you an experience that normal courses cannot. If you don't have project ideas, you can check out my answer on possible side projects.

Developing your profile:

Many students are confused regarding this stage due to its inherent vagueness. Should we focus on competitive programming or side projects? I covered this in another answer, but the bottom line is to have concrete results. Results that demonstrate your skills and competence for the job. They can be,

  • An active GitHub handle with quality repositories
  • Good performance in competitive programming contests
  • Various projects that demonstrate your skill
  • Research Articles: Their importance in technology interviews is debatable, but they surely demonstrate your ability to perform on long-term projects.

Preparation for interviews:

You have strengthened your foundations, now is the time to challenge the most critical part. This stage can be divided into the following,

  • Getting Started - This is the initial stage where you primarily research and become familiar with the interview process. Reviewing data structures and algorithms should be your main focus at this time. Some useful resources,
    • Blogs, official Google site
    • Interview help books (for example, how to decipher the coding interview)
  • Practice - This is where the actual preparation happens. You need to choose a language and start coding in it. This is a good time to start coding on the board. You should also start practicing the specific interview questions now. Here are some resources to help you practice.
    • InterviewBit
    • LeetCode
    • GeekForGeeks
  • Consolidation: We are in the final stages before the actual interviews, now is the time to consolidate what we know. One important thing in the last few weeks would be to practice solving questions "out loud." Doing mock interviews can also help you perform much better in real business.
  • The duration of this stage can vary from months to weeks. I had originally built the above for my Google interviews (extensive details in another answer).

If you have completed all the steps above, all that is left is to sit back and enjoy the amazing hotel reserved for your on-site interviews. All the best!

Yes, I worked there for 7 years and I don't have a degree (and a lousy high school grade point average). They asked for my transcripts after the interview, which was embarrassing (they are bad and I withdrew), but it turned out fine.

The only thing I would say is that there is a great element of luck. I was very lucky to get an interview there, I was lucky to have a solid resume despite my lack of a title, I was lucky to have an interview panel that mostly "clicked" with me, etc., etc.

For software engineer and various related positions, coding is required. However, there are non-coding positions in engineering teams, such as Program Manager and Product Manager, and most positions in departments such as finance and HR do not require coding. Coding positions are generally the highest paying, but everyone gets benefits like free food, micro kitchens, etc.

From what I think, regardless of the university you belong to, they will check, given a problem, how much and to what extent you are able to think about it and what approaches you are following, your direction of thought and, in addition, you must be strong. in algorithms and coding in one language is more than enough. Solve the question just to improve your thinking and analytical skills. The goal should not be to solve more and more questions.

To stay in touch and improve I suggest staying in touch with the sites listed below and yes definitely as stated in the answers above, always get involved with open source.

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From what I think, regardless of the university you belong to, they will check, given a problem, how much and to what extent you are able to think about it and what approaches you are following, your direction of thought and, in addition, you must be strong. in algorithms and coding in one language is more than enough. Solve the question just to improve your thinking and analytical skills. The goal should not be to solve more and more questions.

To stay in touch and improve I suggest staying in touch with the sites listed below and yes definitely, as stated in the answers above, always get involved with the open source communities.

Stack
Overflow Build software better, together.
Algorithm Blogs
GeeksforGeeks - A Computer Portal for Geeks
Programming Interview Questions | CareerCup

Other Guides:


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