What careers have a darker side that most people don't know about?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Kai Palmer



What careers have a darker side that most people don't know about?

Almost all races have a dark side, if you look hard enough. Generally speaking, a job allows you to evade some responsibility for the morality of what you do; a career does not. Of course, jobs can be turned into "careers" quite easily.

Here are some "dark sides" to some common occupations:

  • Waiter: People can be mean, messy, obnoxious, and demanding. And cheap. If you are a vegetarian and you work in a restaurant that serves meat, watching the food preparation can be very disturbing.
  • Doctor: People can be whiny, self-destructive, annoying, gross, and hope that you can fix all their problems.
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Almost all races have a dark side, if you look hard enough. Generally speaking, a job allows you to evade some responsibility for the morality of what you do; a career does not. Of course, jobs can be turned into "careers" quite easily.

Here are some "dark sides" to some common occupations:

  • Waiter: People can be mean, messy, obnoxious, and demanding. And cheap. If you are a vegetarian and you work in a restaurant that serves meat, watching the food preparation can be very disturbing.
  • Doctor: People can be whiny, self-destructive, annoying, gross, and hope that you can fix all of their problems, some of which they might have exacerbated on their own. I know of a woman who refused physical therapy after surgery to help heal; and threatened, unpleasantly enough, to sue the surgeon when it was clear that he would have to repeat the surgery. Stress levels may be off limits.
  • Entrepreneur, Small Business Owner - The paperwork and legality associated with getting your business running can be overwhelming and really ruin you. And the policy of raising money and trying to build support for your business, especially if you live in a place where corruption is rampant and it really is about who you know, not just what you have to offer (which is everywhere) it can be very dark. You can end up making deals with the devil without realizing your mistakes.
  • Politics and government: d'oh
  • Scientist: You can focus so narrowly that you can't see the bigger picture of what you're doing, or the implications. Or you can get so involved and tear politics apart that your passions and observations are silenced, ignored, and overlooked, rather than nurtured and celebrated.
  • Teaching: You may lose interest and enthusiasm for both your subject and the students you teach. I don't know how some teachers deal with the parents and families of some children who are very involved in their children's growth into adulthood; I also don't know how they treat those children who have no one in their lives to support and appreciate them, or who have been exposed to so much pain, struggle, and bad environments from a young age that it seems impossible to reach them. Either way, there are dark and hard sides.


Every career has its downsides. Some people are better equipped to handle these inconveniences than others.

I soon realized that I was probably not that well equipped to handle the profession of doctor or nurse; It's not that I didn't have compassion, I had too much, and it would have hurt too much every time I saw someone in pain and struggling, and it would have made me over time turn cold and objectify patients. I saw nurses and doctors who were like that and I didn't want to be like that. On the other hand, I have also met doctors and other people in the health professions (including amazing administrators) who have their compassion built into them as a pure and never-ending wellspring of care and empathy, with superior healing powers just from their mere presence. . If there is a career I wish I could do (and I know I could have, but not at the level I would aspire to) it would be in healthcare, and I ' I'm just not cut out for it. Too inconvenient for me to work with sick people all day.

Instead, I have spent decades working with obscure regulatory requirements and rich people. There are also a lot of drawbacks, but it took me longer to realize.

To work in local government:

  • Your desire to make your community a better place to live is held back by red tape - you'll find that many of the things you want to do require you to comply with tons of regulations. Some things have to be approved by relevant bodies (city council, planning commission, state / national / senate legislature, etc.), which means that funding for a project will take a long time. Some projects may be delayed due to funding, politics, or sometimes lawsuits.
  • Most of your job is dealing with endless paperwork - working in the government means you must have great familiarity and comfort.
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To work in local government:

  • Your desire to make your community a better place to live is held back by red tape - you'll find that many of the things you want to do require you to comply with tons of regulations. Some things have to be approved by relevant bodies (city council, planning commission, state / national / senate legislature, etc.), which means that funding for a project will take a long time. Some projects may be delayed due to funding, politics, or sometimes lawsuits.
  • Most of your job is dealing with endless paperwork - working in the government means you must have a great deal of familiarity and comfort with legal language. These restrictions, while protecting all citizens of the community, mean that you have to follow many rules just to do something simple.
  • A good majority of people do not participate in the public process: Since many town hall meetings (or other relevant commissions) take place at night, it is likely that the majority of the people who attend will be seniors or vocal activists. Sometimes they yell at you or yell at you. These can tend to demoralize you, which is why thick skin is very important.
  • Much of what is done is not based on what you know, but mainly on strong interpersonal skills: people are more likely to agree and work with you if they are comfortable with your personality and character, regardless of your stance on an issue. in particular. . Once you have established this trust, they will feel more comfortable listening to you.
  • Government workers are being asked to be objective - the reality is that most decisions are made by politicians, not you. You are more or less in charge of explaining and analyzing the relevant regulations to the public, and then the public decides which direction to take. They may or may not listen to your advice.


I can't say that working in the government is bad. There are also many positives. It is a very relaxed career with a good work-life balance, stable and has (despite being slow) many projects to do. Depending on where you live, it can also be a very well paid career. If you adapt to regulations, learning about policies can be really interesting.

However, these negative factors can also mean that things slow down and it is much more difficult to innovate. If you want to make a difference, the nonprofit sector is more driven by impact.

A government job is good if you are much more concerned with meeting the individual needs of each person and being a "moderator" of the city. Making a difference means taking a particular side, which means that you will only represent one (or a few) groups of particular people. Ultimately, the decision to work in one or the other will depend on your values.

I work in software development and the dark side is:

  1. Middle managers who have no idea what you're doing read a book, micromanage you, and give you solutions. They call us resources, I heard somewhere we should call them overhead - if someone in the big organization reads it, remove the middle managers layer and spend this money on hiring good developers to make IT more efficient.
  2. Offshore equipment - These are generally cheap and you pay for what you get. No standards, no troubleshooting.
  3. Soft skills get overlooked and quite often you end up working with a few people.
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I work in software development and the dark side is:

  1. Middle managers who have no idea what you're doing read a book, micromanage you, and give you solutions. They call us resources, I heard somewhere we should call them overhead - if someone in the big organization reads it, remove the middle managers layer and spend this money on hiring good developers to make IT more efficient.
  2. Offshore equipment - These are generally cheap and you pay for what you get. No standards, no troubleshooting.
  3. Soft skills get overlooked, and quite often you end up working with people who can't work as a team. They just do something, they never ask and the whole team has to work around them, since "we can't hire a new person because it costs and he knows this technology."
  4. Managers think IT is easy and in many organizations it is not recognized as a skill as an accountant or actuary. It is a pity that there is no formal body to obtain the qualification.
  5. Many organizations think it is a cost and the result is that they do not get talent only cheap people, then suddenly someone comes up with a new technology that is supposed to solve anything like magic and it is usually a failure.
  6. Sexism: Most developers are men and many of them feel very insecure around a woman who is a good developer. I work with two guys who are going to die and they don't ask me a question, however, they explain me how to do my job (they do the front-end, I do the back-end), they talk about me and interrupt especially if I did something magnificent. and people thank me and try to steal the credit, like presenting my project. I need to set a lot of limits with them. Also that women should be useful and that helping others is part of his job, so if he does not rush to pick up the pieces, he is not a good colleague. Men don't need to. Or once a PM asked me to take notes because I was a woman when it was their meeting! I'm glad people stood up for me.
  7. Age discrimination occurs but less, perhaps because I look young for my age. But there is a tendency to think that only young people are good developers. Is not true. They will probably work long hours, but nothing will replace the experience that older developers have. Very often we (I am over 40 years old) have simple solutions that will cover the most important thing, as we experience similar things in the past. As well as having good craftsmanship: a well-designed solution, proper unit tests, maintainable code, reusable code. You learn it with experience.

Teaching: The two days before the arrival of the students and the two days after their departure for the summer.

Usually the teachers here start the school year a week before the students arrive. In all the schools I have taught, that week has been the same: three days of meetings (we have to watch the Bloodborne Pathogens video… again…) and then two days of preparing their classroom.

Most of the teachers come to school in sweat pants and T-shirts. The first thing that is installed in each classroom is the radio. Each teacher plays their own favorite music while they are setting up the classroom. Get in

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Teaching: The two days before the arrival of the students and the two days after their departure for the summer.

Usually the teachers here start the school year a week before the students arrive. In all the schools I have taught, that week has been the same: three days of meetings (we have to watch the Bloodborne Pathogens video… again…) and then two days of preparing their classroom.

Most of the teachers come to school in sweat pants and T-shirts. The first thing that is installed in each classroom is the radio. Each teacher plays their own favorite music while they are setting up the classroom. Walking down the hall is like pressing the "scan" button on your radio. Each teacher has different tastes.

We spend around 50% of the day preparing our classes and the other 50% of the day chatting with each other. The school usually provides the teachers with lunch on those days. Teachers who have children of their own often enlist their own children to help them set up.

But nothing is as fun as clean-up days after students leave for the summer. The outfits are the same. The music is the same. There are some year-end cleanup chores to do, like submitting report cards and other things. That takes a maximum of two hours. After that, you can start your summer vacation once your room is clean. Everything has to be knocked off the walls. Everything has to be boxed, so they can take it out of the room during the summer while they wax the floors.

It is much easier and more fun to tear things off walls than to put them on. The janitor puts a box of garbage bags in the hallway, and we take what we need, fill it up, and leave it in the hallway, all while stopping to chat a lot with our co-workers. Personally, I like listening to headbands from the 80s as I rip things off the walls of my classroom.

Some of the teachers are known to bring wine into their classrooms on those days.

My experience?

  1. Tool and Die Machinist - You can possibly earn $ 30- $ 40 per HOUR with as much extra time as you can bear (and sometimes more than you can bear). It takes about 5-10 years to get really good at it. However, you will be a regular machinist during this time and your salary is $ 30 per HOUR.
  2. Shift / Break Scheduler - Especially if you have experience with Primavera or Maximo. You can start in the mid $ 40s per hour and easily progress up to $ 60-70s per hour, again with plenty of extra time. It takes approximately 2 to 5 years to master, depending on a person's programming skills.
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My experience?

  1. Tool and Die Machinist - You can possibly earn $ 30- $ 40 per HOUR with as much extra time as you can bear (and sometimes more than you can bear). It takes about 5-10 years to get really good at it. However, you will be a regular machinist during this time and your salary is $ 30 per HOUR.
  2. Shift / Break Scheduler - Especially if you have experience with Primavera or Maximo. You can start in the mid $ 40s per hour and easily progress up to $ 60-70s per hour, again with plenty of extra time. It takes approximately 2 to 5 years to master, depending on programming and software skills.
  3. Nondestructive Testing (NDT) Personnel - Starts in the top $ 20 per hour and peaks at $ 50. However, given the staff shortage, you could easily work 70-80 hours a week and earn more than $ 100,000 per year. A two-year degree (minimum) will be required and you won't have to wait long if you are looking for work.
  4. Pipe Fitter: No, you don't need to know how to weld. However, you need strong math skills. You can earn from the top $ 20 to the bottom $ 40 per HOUR. And again, there are often almost unlimited overtime on jobs, especially contract jobs.
  5. Deck Sailor (or really any job) Inland Waterways - All inland waterways in the United States have numerous barge crews. The median age of the career is 50 years and continues to increase. With about 1 or 2 years of schooling, you can become a member of a tugboat crew and bring home close to $ 100,000 (or more) a year. One word of caution: you'll be spending a lot of time away from home, so it's best to live on or very close to one of the larger inland waterways to cut down on travel time.
  6. Wind Turbine Repair Technicians - First things first - You can't be afraid of heights. If you can climb the internal stairs or hang from a bosun's chair and inspect and repair the turbine blades, then you can easily exceed $ 100k. The job is more scary than dangerous as numerous safety devices are employed and all jobs are carefully planned in advance.
  7. Saturation diver - also known as an underwater welder. The hardest part is the diving; soldering seems to be easy for people. This is a very dangerous job and it pays well. $ 200k is not uncommon and you can travel a lot.
  8. Aircraft Mechanic / Technician (Persian Gulf region): especially those with military aircraft experience. They can't find enough people to do this job and so they are constantly looking. Easily exceed $ 100k per year and probably much more with per diem and overtime.

As I have the highest respect for public officials. I know that it is not an easy task for anyone to work despite many restrictions, social foundations and an intricate environment, especially in a country like India. But the willingness to serve for our beloved country makes this task easier. There is no doubt that the benefit they get after a busy schedule is very influential, but there are also some dark sides. Okay, I would like to portray the dark side of an IAS / IPS with some genuine examples. As I am from Jabalpur, MP. So I would like to take examples from my own city, and I am sure I could fi

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As I have the highest respect for public officials. I know that it is not an easy task for anyone to work despite many restrictions, social foundations and an intricate environment, especially in a country like India. But the willingness to serve for our beloved country makes this task easier. There is no doubt that the benefit they get after a busy schedule is very influential, but there are also some dark sides. Okay, I would like to portray the dark side of an IAS / IPS with some genuine examples. As I am from Jabalpur, MP. So I would like to take examples from my own city, and I am sure that you could find this type of example in any part of our country because it is a crude truth and in whatever way we have to face it in our day to day life. have a look …

  • IPS GAURAV TIWARI: -

2010 Batch IPS officer Gaurav tiwari is known for his loyalty and hard work. He is very diligent and dedicated to his work. He recently became the center of attention when he was transferred. On January 10, the MADHYA PRADESH government transferred Katni District Police Superintendent (SP), Gaurav Tiwari, to Chhindwara. The 2010 group's young IPS officer was investigating some influential leaders in the ruling BJP for their alleged links to a Rs 500 crore hawala (MONEY LAUNDERING). The case is then sent to the Criminal Investigation Department (CID) .The sensational case of large fictitious account transactions emerged a few months ago following a complaint from a farmer who claimed that unidentified people made transactions of Rs 90 lakh from a Jan -Dhan. savings account opened in your name at an Axis Bank branch in the Katni district. You learned about the transactions only after receiving a notice from the income tax (IT) department. Another person had filed a similar complaint alleging cash transactions of Rs 16 lakh through a savings account opened in his name at the same bank branch. Initially, the matter was overlooked under the rug. But when Tiwari took over, he reopened the case and discovered around 32 such accounts through which large transactions were carried out. These accounts were opened in the name of BPL cardholders, as well as small and micro-enterprises (MIPYMES). Investigations had revealed that such accounts were opened by mining barons. Then all of a sudden

This is not the first time your transfer has created a flutter in the IPS circle. Previously, it was the insurgency-trained police force in the Balaghat Maoist hotbed that had been shaken and shaken by an unprecedented crackdown by the state government after an alleged assault on an RSS pracharak.

  • IAS RAMESH LOS: -

1993 Batch IAS Officer is a well-known IAS Officer from Madhya Pradesh. He was suspended from his job in 2002 after the Lokayukta special police establishment allegedly caught him receiving a 1 lakh rupee bribe from the head of a technical institute. However, he was acquitted of the bribery charge by the High Court of Parliament and later by the Supreme Court. But during his suspension period he suffered greatly. I remember an article published in a local newspaper about his sufferings during his suspension. He mentioned that his wife suffered from chronic stomach pain and that he did not have a penny to cure her illness. Then a wala rickshaw who was his acquaintance helped his wife. After that incident, he told me that he would never suggest to my children that they become civil servants,

Ramesh thete sir is well known for his work. We have a well known model road in Jabalpur. This road was built by Ramesh thete sir during his tenure as commissioner of Nagar nigam, Jabalpur in 2000. At that time he assured that the life of this road would be more than 150 years and still not a single concrete can be found. getting off the road. It is a very smooth and well maintained road from Jabalpur. But the reward he got for his good work is jail, exploitation, etc. Politicians have used his influence to ruin his career.

Gaurav tiwari and ramesh thete are not only in this queue. We have hundreds of examples. During the congressional regime, IAS Ashok khemka has disclosed files of illegal land allocation. But for his good work, the reward he got was his transfer letter. This may be harsh, spicy for you, but this is the reality. Many times the reward for a good job goes to the state government, but in the event of failure, the defendant would be only IPS / IAS. they bear this pressure alone, they do not want any kind of participation from their families. And this is not an easy task for anyone. That is why many prefer to commit suicide rather than continue.

Expect! Now the dark sides of IAS / IPS to your knowledge.

Professional subway pushers.

The Japanese subway system is known for its efficiency and speed throughout the world. In fact, in the capital city of Tokyo, nearly 40 million people ride the rails every day. This greatly outperforms other methods of transportation, such as cars or buses.

The Tokyo subway network is incredibly fast and efficient. Trains usually run every 5 minutes and, during rush hours, they usually run every 2 to 3 minutes. If you do the math, it's 12-20 trains every hour going in one direction.

However, despite the efficiency of the Tokyo subway system, it is still incredibly crowded.

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Professional subway pushers.

The Japanese subway system is known for its efficiency and speed throughout the world. In fact, in the capital city of Tokyo, nearly 40 million people ride the rails every day. This greatly outperforms other methods of transportation, such as cars or buses.

The Tokyo subway network is incredibly fast and efficient. Trains usually run every 5 minutes and, during rush hours, they usually run every 2 to 3 minutes. If you do the math, it's 12-20 trains every hour going in one direction.

However, despite the efficiency of the Tokyo subway system, there are still a lot of people, especially during rush hours. In fact, reports indicate that most metro systems operate above capacity, some even operate at 200% capacity.

To get as many passengers inside each car as possible, the stations used oshiya or subway pushers to push people inside the car so that the doors could be closed.

A subway pusher at work

At first, these smugglers were mainly students, working part-time to earn some money, but as the years went by, dedicated and professional subway smugglers started working at these stations.

Subway pushers are originally an American concept. Seen for the first time in New York, they did not like them due to their hostility when pushing passengers. They were known as "sardine packers" because of the vigor with which they did their job. However, with the invention of automatic doors, they were out of work.

In Japan, however, subway congestion has become a painful problem. The bodies are so tightly packed that they sometimes squeeze against the car windows. People can suffocate on other passengers' coats. Getting off at the correct station requires a lot of strength and determination. Fire hazards and emergency evacuations are also an urgent problem.

I'm sorry it was a bad pun

It is to be hoped that in the future this situation can be remedied.

Tokyo compression. Photo credit: Michael Wolf (photographer) - Wikipedia

That is not necessarily true. Some jobs require a degree or you are not even allowed to apply. For example, you cannot be an officer in the US Navy without a bachelor's degree from an ACCREDITED college or university.

If you want to live life with a high school diploma, and if you (and possibly your family) can live on that amount of money, that kind of lifestyle, go for it. Or maybe your dad has a company that can or will give you a largely endowed Trust Fund. I know some people like that.

In life, no one knows what opportunities (or tragedies) lie ahead, but you are diminishing yourself

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That is not necessarily true. Some jobs require a degree or you are not even allowed to apply. For example, you cannot be an officer in the US Navy without a bachelor's degree from an ACCREDITED college or university.

If you want to live life with a high school diploma, and if you (and possibly your family) can live on that amount of money, that kind of lifestyle, go for it. Or maybe your dad has a company that can or will give you a largely endowed Trust Fund. I know some people like that.

In life, no one knows what opportunities (or tragedies) lie ahead, but you are diminishing your own opportunities by not pursuing education beyond high school.

There are some people who have fantastic luck without getting their degrees, like college dropouts Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, and those who qualify for the very short lists of professional sports teams, but without a degree, the odds are extremely against them.

The best-paying, living-wage jobs are available with a two-year degree, which could lead you to a company you could move up to. Two-year community college programs are a great way to decide whether you can / should earn your four-year degree or go away with your two-year degree and get a good job with technical training. It is also the least expensive path, but it is still not cheap.

In short, high school diplomas, while serving as the required foundation for higher education, will be less and less sufficient for a reasonable lifestyle; while people with higher education credentials will be more competitive for the best jobs. However, and be careful, a college degree is NOT a guarantee of a successful career, but it is the first step.

Good luck and God bless you - MS

Sales engineer! If you like talking to people to solve big complex problems for companies and if you are a bit technical and can learn quickly, this is the job for you!

You have the opportunity to travel the world and the company pays. I've been to most of the US states, but some of my universities had to travel to APAC, EMEA, and Australia! Many of my SE friends have accumulated so many airline miles that they have lifetime gold status from airlines and hotels. It makes traveling for fun that much more fun when you can commute in points from work. And if you don't want to travel a lot (like me now that I have a young family)

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Sales engineer! If you like talking to people to solve big complex problems for companies and if you are a bit technical and can learn quickly, this is the job for you!

You have the opportunity to travel the world and the company pays. I've been to most of the US states, but some of my universities had to travel to APAC, EMEA, and Australia! Many of my SE friends have accumulated so many airline miles that they have lifetime gold status from airlines and hotels. It makes traveling for fun that much more fun when you can commute in points from work. And if you don't want to travel a lot (like me now that I have a young family), there are places for you too.

You get the thrill of winning a deal without the overwhelming stress of having a fee. I keep track of the revenue I bring to the business, but most PEs say they are not measured by this metric.

Pays well. Most PEs get a commission or bonus based on what they sell. and they also receive a base salary. the combination varies from company to company, but gives me the foundation to keep the home afloat and the excitement of a voucher to take the family on vacation. Sales typically generate more, but this is a great position for you if you want scalable pay.

It is the perfect combination of teamwork and independence. You work as a team and they help you a lot, but it's your business. They are paired with reps to work together, but often more than 1. So you get a variety of personalities to interact with.

There is no class in college to take this, you have to learn on the job. Most industries do not have this role and it is relatively new to the software world. But if you can find your way around, it's the perfect job. It doesn't require a certain degree, and if you don't consider yourself technical (I don't think of me that way) you can still do well at this job.

In all but the largest and most professionalized tech companies, any full-fledged programmer can probably gain access to your personal data, or change / corrupt your user data or that of others, according to their whims. I am going to break down two key parts: * By “all but the largest and most professionalized”, I generally mean companies that are not yet public. When going public, most tech companies need their processes to be audited and certified so that a programmer can ...

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In the world of thoroughbred horses, breeding a female must be done with a "living cover", which means that the stallion must deliver the sperm the old-fashioned way.

One job that is very important to the welfare of horses is "Dick Man". He actually guides the stallion inward and, upon ejaculation, pulls out his penis and smears himself for examination under a microscope to confirm swimmers.

Dick man makes about $ 2,500 to $ 3,000 plus a week during the breeding season.

Very few opinion pieces are written by their signatories.

This is obvious to many who work in public relations or politics, but it is still unknown to a shocking number of people.

Typically, a special interest group will hire a public relations firm or independent consultant to write the op-ed; Once it's written, the group looks for an appropriate influencer to sign it, be it a business leader, politician, or other luminary.

Yes, the signatory reads the opinion piece and supports it, but I have been surprised several times in conversations with friends and family who don't realize that 90 percent of the opinion piece

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Very few opinion pieces are written by their signatories.

This is obvious to many who work in public relations or politics, but it is still unknown to a shocking number of people.

Typically, a special interest group will hire a public relations firm or independent consultant to write the op-ed; Once it's written, the group looks for an appropriate influencer to sign it, be it a business leader, politician, or other luminary.

Yes, the signer reads the opinion piece and supports it, but I have been surprised several times in conversations with friends and family who don't realize that 90 percent of the opinion pieces we see in the newspapers were not written. by the business or political leaders under whose name they appear.

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