What career path did you pursue as an INTJ?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Rory Willis



What career path did you pursue as an INTJ?

In high school, I was the leader of my local Dairy Queen. This gave me the benefit (debatable at the time) of a bit of forced interaction and customer service experience.
After graduation, I began my US Naval service (which I had enrolled in a year earlier). My qualification was a nuclear electronics technician, which put me as a reactor controls technician (for a nuclear power reactor), in addition to other duties.
When I was incarcerated, I needed something to stimulate my mind and I was allowed an apprenticeship in ornamental gardening, which also requires a fairly diverse skill set. Me too ass

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In high school, I was the leader of my local Dairy Queen. This gave me the benefit (debatable at the time) of a bit of forced interaction and customer service experience.
After graduation, I began my US Naval service (which I had enrolled in a year earlier). My qualification was a nuclear electronics technician, which put me as a reactor controls technician (for a nuclear power reactor), in addition to other duties.
When I was incarcerated, I needed something to stimulate my mind and I was allowed an apprenticeship in ornamental gardening, which also requires a fairly diverse skill set. I also assisted the learning coordinator, so I studied related training books for other crafts (masonry, woodworking, welding, and a bit of pipe fitting). As a time occupier, I also took a correspondence course through the Library of Congress to become certified as a Braille transcriber, and I enjoyed transcribing puzzles (Sudoku and crossword puzzles mainly) after my certification.
Since my release, I started working in an automobile supplier factory and won a job tender in the maintenance department (after 6 months in the plant) as a multi-trades maintenance technician. We have to know everything, do everything and keep it going.
I don't really care, but at least it's attractive when something breaks (although it might NOT have broken if someone had listened for just a little while, or six months, earlier). It seems to be the best I can get as a sex offender, although that hasn't stopped me from applying for more attractive jobs (as a power plant operator).

Life ended my management, I am currently managing three companies in the real estate field. I do not have an acquired skill as engineering or accounting, but in urban planning, which gives me a visionary overview of construction.

It helped my preference for creating and maintaining systems from planning to construction to rental and maintenance.

Software engineer / architect.

I knew what I wanted to do at 13 and taught myself how to program, I had a short stent in the US Navy, and then I went to college to learn the theory behind what I had learned.

I am still doing software engineering and have no plans to leave the field anytime soon.

Several careers throughout life. Art teacher, dental lab technician, picture frameer, custom quilt, award-winning textile artist, Reiki practitioner, certified aromatherapist, author, and soon to be a reflexologist. At the age of 65, you might be lucky enough to have 2 more races ahead of you.

Based on what I've read, the two best careers for an INTJ are:

1. Lawyer. For the most part, they work alone or with a small team of fellow attorneys if they are part of a firm. For introverts like INTJs, this is the best possible arrangement: working alone or in small groups, showing up only in public when it's time to dispense your expertise.

2. Consultant. Same treatment as the lawyer. The INTJ consultant hides in an office or classroom for years, learns everything he needs to know about his chosen topic, and then suddenly bursts out, brimming with experience and into

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Based on what I've read, the two best careers for an INTJ are:

1. Lawyer. For the most part, they work alone or with a small team of fellow attorneys if they are part of a firm. For introverts like INTJs, this is the best possible arrangement: working alone or in small groups, showing up only in public when it's time to dispense your expertise.

2. Consultant. Same treatment as the lawyer. The INTJ consultant hides in an office or classroom for years, learns everything he needs to know about his chosen topic, and suddenly bursts out, brimming with experience and insider knowledge, handing it over to those who are willing to pay. they good for their services.

I would add the following careers to that list:

3. Teacher. One thing INTJs like (or at least I like) is to dispense with their expertise. They are not extroverts, so the classroom environment may not agree with them, but speaking for myself, I found that I could become an extrovert for a few hours a day when I was working as a teacher. In return, I was able to educate and instruct young people on the vagaries of subjects I adored: English, and occasionally history, politics, culture, and mythology. Really, any profession that allows an INTJ to pursue their geek interests and dispense their accumulated knowledge is a good profession.

4. Scientific. INTJs are highly rational and analytical people. There is no career more suitable for them than that of a scientist: a person of esoteric interests, working individually or with a small group in a cloistered laboratory, probing the mysteries of the universe with the strategic application of the scientific method and their own considerable ability. intellectual. gaining fame and recognition for his groundbreaking discoveries and theories. INTJ heaven, in other words.

5. Engineer. The same principle as the scientist, actually. INTJs like nothing more than shutting themselves up in a secluded place and putting their considerable brainpower to work on a complicated problem, and that's exactly what an engineer's job description is: problem solving with brainpower.

6. Architect. Hell, at 16personalities.com, INTJs are known as "architects." This works largely on the same principle as science or engineering majors. The INTJ architect can take refuge in his studio, put his incredible brain to work designing a building from scratch, and use his obsessive attention to detail and relentless perfectionism to the max. The result may not be the prettiest building, but you better believe that it will be sensibly structured and utilitarian.

7. Writer. What is more introverted than writing? I'm an INTJ writer myself, and it's a perfect career. I can sit here, in private, and dream my little worlds inside my head, and then I publish them and you (the public) read and adore them. That's heaven for an INTJ. The writer's career path encourages the four initials of the INTJ type indicator: "I" (introverted), "N" (intuitive), "T" (thinking), and "J" (judging). The only problems INTJ writers can have are these: they can spend too much time obsessively planning a book and never actually write it; they can write characters that are intensely rational, but boring as hell because they are not emotional (INTJs don't understand emotions, in general); and, If their job is rejected, INTJs can turn into a narcissistic rage. “What do you mean that my work is not publishable? I SPEND FOR YEARS creating the PERFECT NOVEL, and now YOU REJECT it, you pathetic ape! "

8. Judge. INTJs are Thinking Judgers, which means they make decisions based on reason, not emotion, and they like to make plans rather than improvise. You can bet that an INTJ judge will already be familiar with all the facts of a criminal case before they hear the defendant's attorney open his mouth and, based on the jury's verdict, they will deliver a cold, calculating, and logical ruling. You can't expect anything but the purest justice (as the INTJ sees it) from an INTJ judge.

9. Private investigator. As we've seen, INTJs prefer to work alone and love a good intellectual challenge. PI's work is tailor-made for that kind of lifestyle. An INTJ private investigator would go out of his way to make sure his client gets all the facts of the case and is satisfied with the results of the investigation. Their obsessive attention to detail, endless patience, and unwillingness to move until conditions are perfect serve them well in research work.

10. Hitman. Actually, it works the same way as a private investigator. INTJs are lonely, analytical patients who have nothing but contempt for organized structures and rules. Sounds like a hit man, right? An INTJ killer would be selective, turning down jobs for brands that they felt did not deserve death (again, highly developed sense of justice ... see what I wrote in "Judge" above). And yet, despite having disregard for the laws and structures of society, you can expect an INTJ hit man to have much of his own: a set of rules by which he abides, a strict code, a complete and defined set of conditions that a potential brand must satisfy first. he or she qualifies for murder. And as always, You can expect obsessive attention to detail and relentless perfectionism from an INTJ killer. Expect this person to have a gun, backup gun, backup gun for backup gun, knife, and backup knife. And probably a few other tricks up your sleeve as well. And about five escape vehicles and a dozen passports. Plans above plans above plans.

So are you wondering if you are a solid INTJ if you can be a doctor? Well, like me from INTJ, my shirt answer is absolutely yes and there is no reason you could be, unless it is not a profession that you can foresee that you will enjoy doing. Also, if I could do it again and was a more confident female INTJ, I would have actually become a psychiatrist, who is a head physician. Also, if you had been completely lacking in empathy, you wouldn't even have shown any concern about not having enough. The first step to being a good doctor is achieving self-awareness, which is what the MBTI also helps.

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So are you wondering if you are a solid INTJ if you can be a doctor? Well, like me from INTJ, my shirt answer is absolutely yes and there is no reason you could be, unless it is not a profession that you can foresee that you will enjoy doing. Also, if I could do it again and was a more confident female INTJ, I would have actually become a psychiatrist, who is a head physician. Also, if you had been completely lacking in empathy, you wouldn't even have shown any concern about not having enough. The first step to being a good doctor is achieving self-awareness, which is what the MBTI also helps you achieve.

It is also very important being an INTJ does not mean that you really lack empathy. What it really means is that you would rather trust reason and cold logic rather than your feelings; -and in many cases you will find that letting your heart rule you and being too emotionally attached to your patients is NOT really such a good thing. So what does that mean? Well, INTJ is better than other types, except maybe the INTP, it has the ability to separate him or himself from the patient they treat with the help of our dominant Ti.

INTJs may not only have the potential to become great physicians, but they also have great ability to lead and play a leadership role in a medical facility, such as a hospital. It should come as no surprise that someone like Dr. House, a classic INTJ, is a chief physician in a hospital. Why is everyone future-oriented and has the amazing ability to come up with a strategy to improve certain medical facilities? It is also known that not everyone can become a doctor, as it is very difficult to become one with average intelligence, and INTJs, on average, have some of the higher IQs than INTPs.

Having mentioned all that, it does not mean that INTJ is like you and I prefer to make decisions with cold and logical reason than our feelings, it does not mean that we lack empathy or that we have little. Empathy is also something that you can nurture and develop, even if it is not your strong point. For example, I had a very tense relationship with my more sensitive brother for years, who would often get very angry with me by showing few emotions, forgetting about birthdays, and showing little enthusiasm for traditional days or events. I was even spinning around with guilt for years for showing me lack of empathy, recklessness, intellectual snobbishness, and being a bad aunt to her children until one day I said "enough is enough."

Yes, my brother, like many other people always had the impression that I was an academic / intellectual snob, but it was just the insatiable intellectual curiosity that many INTJs have. So if being a doctor is your life's dream, don't hold back, because you'll likely regret it in the future.

Old question, but maybe my answer will be helpful to others.

In fact, I tried "coding" / programming, and it wasn't for me. Probably the two biggest reasons were 1) I didn't feel like I was good enough at it and didn't have the patience to put in the amount of time that other people say is necessary to improve, and 2) I didn't have the passion that I saw others people learning to code. I code a little bit from time to time in my work, and a little bit is really enough.

I could never accept a career where I don't feel like I'm quite exceptional at what I do. And a lot

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Old question, but maybe my answer will be helpful to others.

In fact, I tried "coding" / programming, and it wasn't for me. Probably the two biggest reasons were 1) I didn't feel like I was good enough at it and didn't have the patience to put in the amount of time that other people say is necessary to improve, and 2) I didn't have the passion that I saw others people learning to code. I code a little bit from time to time in my work, and a little bit is really enough.

I could never accept a career where I don't feel like I'm quite exceptional at what I do. And many programmers seem critical, not necessarily in person, but simply what they read on the Internet. They judge the educational background of other programmers, that ... I did not study Computer Science. I was partly self-taught and partly as a result of an online "boot camp." And they are always writing things about bad programmers or mediocre programmers. I'd be the "as long as it works" type of programmer, rather than being as fussy as I perceive many programmers to be. At the same time, if I do care a bit what unimportant people think of me, it is related to how they perceive my level of competence.

I also hated the whole GitHub and command line thing.

And I just remembered one more topic that I will discuss next (second point) ...

Elimination of jobs

  • Anything that involves a significant amount of customer service and dealing with a group of people. So, I have worked in technical support, help desk and reception. They were backbreaking jobs, yes, but I also often left work very unhappy because you deal with a lot of jerks during the day (i.e. clients, guests, clients, and sometimes coworkers and bosses) in these kinds of jobs. He also tends to get thrown into the fire in these jobs, which is very stressful. You learn on the job, which means you learn by making mistakes ... which is not right for me because I don't like making mistakes, as a perfectionist.
  • Being a lawyer is another field that is sometimes recommended for INTJs, but it wasn't for me either. Some of the reasons she shares with programming are: not fitting in with culture, general lack of women and diversity, unconventional hiring processes. I was definitely not interested in the whole culture of big law firms, and I didn't want to have to work 12 hours a day and worry about billing hours. Part of the culture of lawyers is trying to convince yourself that you care about a lot of nonsense just because you are "supposed" to, which I think is very anti-INTJ. Things like doing a law review and doing a mock trial in law school, and then becoming a partner once you become a lawyer. I was never interested. INTJs can intellectually handle being lawyers, but the culture is so weird and so "you're supposed to do this" and "you're supposed to be this way" that I couldn't handle it. I spent a lot of time in law school feeling like I was fake and played games to "make it" as a lawyer.
  • Repairing, testing, diagnosing and building electronic devices (mainly laptops and servers), which I really loved. The main problems tended to be hours, jerk bosses, and relatively low pay. Depending on where you worked, the hours were all over the place. Sometimes there was no work and I went without pay. Sometimes, I was expected to work from 5 in the morning until they told me I could go home ... sometimes, it wasn't until almost 8 in the afternoon before I could get off work, and then I had to get back to day next at 5 in the morning. When I was busy where I worked, my work dominated my life. The pay was good at the time, but I don't want an existence where all I do is work, even on the weekends. And ultimately
  • See my story on marketing towards the end of this answer.

What do I do now and enjoy

It's hard to label it because it's a hybrid role. I work for a company, where they call me "Ecommerce / Web Administrator". Basically I run online stores for my boss who owns the company and I do a lot of different things related to that: troubleshooting, marketing, ordering / updating / adding / tracking inventory, coding, setting prices, making business decisions, analyzing data, managing shipments, etc. I have always thought that I am a type of person who adapts to all trades, does not master any, and I think my current job is perfect for someone like that, as it involves doing so many different things. I spend a lot of time on the computer or managing inventory on my own. I talk to the owner a lot about business decisions.

I have noticed that my job tends to be considered an IT job or a marketing job depending on the employer. I've learned the hard way that whether or not I like my job depends a lot on how the employer views it, the type of environment I work in, and the type of people I work with. My current employer seems more inclined to think that my job is more technical. Employers look to me from time to time for similar jobs, and most of those employers seem to view this as a marketing job.

I took one of those marketing jobs for a while and it was a terrible experience. Marketing is a very extrovert-friendly field and has a more outgoing culture, while technology is more introvert-friendly. He couldn't deal with the type of people he was working with in marketing, the constant expectations of socializing, the constant meetings, the inefficient use of time, the lack of logic that appeared repeatedly in the high-level employees, feeling like he was micromanaged. and handcuffed in terms of doing my job while still having people complaining about the results and problems etc. My experience was not recognized and valued as much as it should have been, whereas where I currently work it is.

So what I like most about my job is the freedom, the recognition of my skills and intelligence, being able to run a business without taking any of the risks and doing a lot of different things instead of one or two boring things. I also work very well. I work part-time, but earn a full-time salary. But as I mentioned, the trick with this type of work is finding the right place and the right people.

Before I heard about the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), I had done a Ph.D. and a post-doctorate in anthropology and had written a book based on my dissertation, on a very exotic and esoteric subject, but I was back home in New York. York with my parents because there was basically no job for someone like me. So I sought career or vocational counseling with the excellent social services agency FEGS and, among other things, they gave me the MBTI. I rated as an INTJ, otherwise I wouldn't be answering this question, but I was very low on the "J" so I'm pretty close to being an INTP. In fact, I could say the "I

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Before hearing about the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), I had done a Ph.D. and a post-doctorate in anthropology and had written a book based on my dissertation, on a very exotic and esoteric subject, but I was back home in New York. York with my parents because there was basically no job for someone like me. So I sought out career or vocational counseling with the excellent social services agency FEGS and, among other things, they gave me the MBTI. I rated as an INTJ, otherwise I wouldn't be answering this question, but I was very low on the "J" so I'm pretty close to being an INTP. In fact, one could say that the "I" was the most pronounced preference, the "N" was less pronounced, the "T" less pronounced than that, and the "J" less pronounced. In addition to the MBTI, I was given the Strong Interest Inventory, which I also highly recommend, and these two tests put me in the direction I would take moving forward. I decided that in order to have a satisfying future I needed to get out of the sunken ship of academic anthropology and find a career that was good for me, that I could sink into in my 30s and that would give me respect for myself. I had to go back to school, a very humble position for a PhD from one of the best universities, and I became a librarian. See Jay Bernstein's response to What's the bravest thing you ever did to get accepted into a college program later in life? I focused on academic libraries, technical services, and theoretical topics that occupy me to this day. My goal was to be an academic librarian. and find a career that was good for me, that I could dive into in my last 30 years, and that would give me respect for myself. I had to go back to school, a very humble position for a PhD from one of the best universities, and I became a librarian. See Jay Bernstein's response to What's the bravest thing you ever did to get accepted into a college program later in life? I focused on academic libraries, technical services, and theoretical topics that occupy me to this day. My goal was to be an academic librarian. and find a career that was good for me, that I could dive into in my last 30 years, and that would give me respect for myself. I had to go back to school, a very humble position for a PhD from one of the best universities, and I became a librarian. See Jay Bernstein's response to What's the bravest thing you ever did to get accepted into a college program later in life? I focused on academic libraries, technical services, and theoretical topics that occupy me to this day. My goal was to be an academic librarian. Is it the bravest thing you did to get accepted into a college program later in life? I focused on academic libraries, technical services, and theoretical topics that occupy me to this day. My goal was to be an academic librarian. Is it the bravest thing you did to get accepted into a college program later in life? I focused on academic libraries, technical services, and theoretical topics that occupy me to this day. My goal was to be an academic librarian.

Going back to my previous life, I was a smart boy, but I was only interested in things that interested me, such as art and some sciences (not so much literature), and I was a bit of a lazy student in subjects that didn't interest me. I cared, and I wasn't that diligent in doing my homework. I was academically precocious and younger than my classmates, but socially immature. I even had some disciplinary incidents and was in therapy. I was very artistic and not athletic, and that certainly made me the target of bullies who wrongly accused me of being gay. I was accepted and attended one of the best "science high schools" in New York and failed math in my first trimester.

Jumping forward now back to library school, I found the opportunity to become a nice librarian. The library school itself was not much of a challenge, except for advanced cataloging. It wasn't that easy to get a job and I didn't get a few jobs that I would have liked, but I did become an academic librarian, though I did go off track for a time as CEO of a company that creates book exhibitions for conferences. . I have many duties as a librarian. I continue to research, publish articles and give lectures. I do give some teaching, but it's just library instruction, not full classes with assignments and grades. Libraries create a good working environment for people who like books.

I consider MBTI to be a very good indicator and device for understanding the range and interaction between personality types in occupations, families, and interpersonal relationships, including intimate relationships. When I was in the library I took the MBTI again and found that the I, N, and T dimensions had gotten stronger, while I think the J, which was low in the beginning, got even weaker (not sure about this, but it's my memory). So I don't consider myself a typical INTJ, but rather have INTJ and INTP attributes.

Entrepreneurship is probably a very bad choice for people wondering if it is a "smart" choice or not and for people seeking "happiness." The idea of ​​a "suitable workplace" for an entrepreneur is very strange. These questions indicate severe limitations and are simply the wrong questions for a potential entrepreneur to ask.

Entrepreneurship is not a smart choice in general. When 80% of businesses fail, the odds are stacked against you. To be successful, you must know that it is not a smart choice and that you are likely to fail, but you must be willing to do whatever it takes anyway.

Entrepreneurs also n

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Entrepreneurship is probably a very bad choice for people wondering if it is a "smart" choice or not and for people seeking "happiness." The idea of ​​a "suitable workplace" for an entrepreneur is very strange. These questions indicate severe limitations and are simply the wrong questions for a potential entrepreneur to ask.

Entrepreneurship is not a smart choice in general. When 80% of businesses fail, the odds are stacked against you. To be successful, you must know that it is not a smart choice and that you are likely to fail, but you must be willing to do whatever it takes anyway.

Entrepreneurs must also focus on their business, not their happiness. Entrepreneurs striving for happiness for themselves are likely to quit and fail when the going gets tough, and things will get tough enough to make people very unhappy, at least temporarily, if what really they want is happiness rather than a successful business.

Asking about suitability for the workplace seems very strange to a potential entrepreneur. If an entrepreneur doubts that he can shape his own workplace to suit him, what makes you think he can shape a place in the world to suit his business? Even individual contributors can go a long way to shape their workplace, so the idea that a workplace doesn't suit your boss is really weird.

As for the MBTI, any business will require all the axes to be successful. An entrepreneur must be able to move quickly between the big picture and the small details when necessary, be able to think logically about the business while considering the feelings of their partners and employees and potential customers and clients, and be flexible enough. to seize opportunities while remaining firm enough in your plans to carry them out in the face of overwhelming odds against you. Entrepreneurs must be able to work against the guy.

Even if an entrepreneur bought the MBTI, they might have asked how to make it work for their personality type rather than whether it is a smart choice. They may have asked what they need to work harder on, not whether the path would make them happy. I can't imagine ever questioning whether the company would have a purpose, or whether it would bring satisfaction if it were successful, or whether their workplace would be right for them.

(Lastly, I'd like to point out that the Quora engine itself seems to have asked me to answer this question. It doesn't offer me credit for answering this, but I found it an interesting question to answer. Still, I am not, nor have I ever have. been an entrepreneur so I have no idea what I'm talking about).

I have heard that INTJ would make a good entrepreneur. First, they like purposeful planning and work focused on finding solutions (without prevention, effort, and useless routines). So it is ideal for them to own their own business, as they do not like to blindly follow authority and in their business they will probably apply all their perfectionist creative thinking outside the box without obstacles or social friction. They can be as creative, practical or logical as they want without having to explain to any superior, unless there are business partners in which case it is a relationship of equals and

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I have heard that INTJ would make a good entrepreneur. First, they like purposeful planning and work focused on finding solutions (without prevention, effort, and useless routines). So it is ideal for them to own their own business, as they do not like to blindly follow authority and in their business they will probably apply all their perfectionist creative thinking outside the box without obstacles or social friction. They can be as creative, practical or logical as they want without having to explain to any superior, unless there are business partners in which case it is a relationship of equals and it is much better.

Any type of freelance contractor / consultant job where you have full control of how much you learn, how much effort you put in, and the least amount of social interaction and obligations is best.

I can imagine a researcher (ideally university or independent) in any field, professor (not professor), independent lawyer, owner of a small or large business of any kind, whatever suits your interests. The artist or craftsman could also work, since you have full control of your work, clients and environment. I do not recommend any job that requires social interaction with many such as teachers, nurses, client administration / receptionist, food service, etc. BUT MOST IMPORTANTLY, it is important as an INTJ to avoid jobs that interact with other workers who are uneducated or ignorant of the facts. . It sounds classist but we suffer a lot in those scenarios.

I think the doctor is much better than the nurse, as people will give you blind deference and ask you to socialize less with your peers. The work is people-centered but solution-based. Therefore, as long as you can "cure" the patient with your solution, he will not be asked to play many more games. You might get bored with the repetitive cases of patients and the level of stupidity of some human beings whose health problems are simply due to a lack of exercise, so would you suggest specializing in a certain part of the body: the feet? or expect to stick to research

  1. Homeschooling from sixth grade through graduation. I started working in hospitality when I was 15 years old. I was drawn to graphic design in my last two years of pretending to learn how to be college ready in the prescribed way.
  2. Degree in Linguistics.
  3. He ran out of money and got a job as a graphic designer. He started making real money without a degree. Ecstatic.
  4. Promoted to Marketing Director. More ecstatic. It lasted long enough to have ended with bitterness in my barely young heart yet.
  5. He saw the light at the other end of a quarter-life crisis and eloped with work at a fishing lodge for a summer in one o
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  1. Homeschooling from sixth grade through graduation. I started working in hospitality when I was 15 years old. I was drawn to graphic design in my last two years of pretending to learn how to be college ready in the prescribed way.
  2. Degree in Linguistics.
  3. He ran out of money and got a job as a graphic designer. He started making real money without a degree. Ecstatic.
  4. Promoted to Marketing Director. More ecstatic. It lasted long enough to have ended with bitterness in my barely young heart yet.
  5. He saw the light at the other end of a quarter-life crisis and eloped with a job at a fishing lodge for a summer in one of the few most beautiful places in the world.
  6. He returned to the city a new man. The first time I felt like an adult. I resumed freelance graphic design while looking for opportunities in healthcare, fueled by my new perspective combined with years of repressed memories of family members making poor decisions that inevitably lead to cancer, stroke, heart attack, and Alzheimer's. I stepped foot in the doorway of a hospital in hopes of making a significant contribution in some way. It was bonus money at the end of the day. Nothing to lose.
  7. I became a supervisor in my area eight months later. The graphic design was shelved. I fired my former teammates and replaced them with hand-picked souls, all fantastic in their own right.
  8. I brought them through COVID in our niche place within the department a little over a year later. We endured the center of care for three months like only some of those who faced COVID every day. All of my staff were promoted that year out of my team and into higher positions, just what they deserved and everything they had hoped for during their interviews.
  9. My manager tried to block my progression when he returned from 10 weeks of free loading from our generous organization, which provided full compensation to anyone who `` didn't feel comfortable '' volunteering to be on-site in the middle of things during maximum uncertainty. She called a meeting with me and her coworker to identify opportunities for improvement. I pushed my answer so far up his butt that I got my progression through HR three weeks later.
  10. I applied for a unique opportunity as the first healthcare quality improvement specialist in my department.
  11. I received and accepted an offer.
  12. Among the things that are 99% more interesting, I assign tasks to that former boss that arise from the critical analysis of problems within not only one area of ​​my department, but all of them.
  13. Exploring college options with the intention of completing my bachelor's degree a week ago. Now I have the time, money, and real life experience to take that seriously.

I wish there was more description for the question, I could interpret it in many ways, especially when, as an INTJ, there will always be a lot of "what if" possibilities to answer a question. However, my answer will be based on self-control, self-esteem, and self-motivation based on my experience and not research or science.

1- Do introspection, again and again ... aa and again

-> know your strengths and then develop them to be the best and most unique version of yourself

-> get to know your weaknesses and then ACCEPT them completely without regret or low self-esteem, then develop

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I wish there was more description for the question, I could interpret it in many ways, especially when, as an INTJ, there will always be a lot of "what if" possibilities to answer a question. However, my answer will be based on self-control, self-esteem, and self-motivation based on my experience and not research or science.

1- Do introspection, again and again ... aa and again

-> know your strengths and then develop them to be the best and most unique version of yourself

-> get to know your weaknesses and then ACCEPT them completely without regret or lowering your self-esteem, and then develop alternative solutions.

2- Test yourself

Along with the first point, test yourself to validate and recognize your limits and how good or bad you can go.

for instance

You read that INTJs are socially awkward, but I know I stand out for engaging politically with business units despite the ironic fact that I am weak on social media in general. But that's okay, because I know the way to excellent and effective communication when I need efficiency in networks.

3- Increase your self-esteem: Compare your strengths and weaknesses only with your old self and not with others. because each one was born with their own strengths and weaknesses.

According to Gallup, investing in your strengths can improve them up to 10 times as much as it is better than investing in your weaknesses and improving them a little.
As an example for INTJs:
Strategist (Strength), you can easily have a great improvement while

Sympathy (weaknesses) will continue to be difficult despite the enormous effort you can make.

Note: I did my strength assessment through the Gallup "StrengthsFinder 2.0" assessment and it helped a lot.

Good luck

I worked almost 10 different jobs and positions.

The best job I've ever had is

Business process management (optimizer)

The reason:

It complements my strengths as a strategist. I was THE star. I was the best. I enjoyed redesigning different processes. Start by having space and time to understand, think, investigate, study situations, interview people, investigate and analyze challenges to redesign or redesign processes. And propose different plans, ideas and solutions to create the best possible process to increase efficiency, reduce costs, save time and effort.

My job was:

Opti

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I worked almost 10 different jobs and positions.

The best job I've ever had is

Business process management (optimizer)

The reason:

It complements my strengths as a strategist. I was THE star. I was the best. I enjoyed redesigning different processes. Start by having space and time to understand, think, investigate, study situations, interview people, investigate and analyze challenges to redesign or redesign processes. And propose different plans, ideas and solutions to create the best possible process to increase efficiency, reduce costs, save time and effort.

My job was:

Optimize processes in terms of efficiency, reduce costs, save time and effort. Standard projects can include:

  1. Understand the goal or create a goal if it is my initiative
  2. Understand the processes as they are,
  3. Then optimize it to design the future process.
  4. Then identify the gap between the current state and the future
  5. Then plan how to bridge the gap between what's in the future
  6. Then take the implementation to completion acting as a Project Manager, including cooperating with different teams such as:
    1. IT for technical development
    2. Business Process Designer for documentation
    3. Stakeholders: identify required training and then train apprentices and quality trainers
    4. Management information system: for measurement and reporting
    5. ...

I hope you find it useful

I'm going to assume you mean a career in the sense that the INTJ woke up wanting to work 10 hours a day 6 days a week and not a job to earn money.

Anything that is almost infinite by nature, but definite. It sounds backwards, but the race has to be something the INTJ can focus on and doesn't get boring despite a great deal of effort put into "perfecting" it. For me personally, that is finance and economics.

They should stay away from anything repetitive by nature.

List of fields of study / careers:

Architect (it's one of INTJ's nicknames after all)

Almost

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I'm going to assume you mean a career in the sense that the INTJ woke up wanting to work 10 hours a day 6 days a week and not a job to earn money.

Anything that is almost infinite by nature, but definite. It sounds backwards, but the race has to be something the INTJ can focus on and doesn't get boring despite a great deal of effort put into "perfecting" it. For me personally, that is finance and economics.

They should stay away from anything repetitive by nature.

List of fields of study / careers:

Architect (it's one of INTJ's nicknames after all)

Almost everything in finance

Statistical

Website design (if they have artistic ability, that is, with a high openness trait in the big 5)

Programming

engineering

Physical

If they can live in an academic environment (personally I find it constrained) University professor

Real estate developer

Surgeon / doctor, but probably not in a people position (personally)

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