What career can a convicted criminal have after his release?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Imogen Wilkinson



What career can a convicted criminal have after his release?

I have been out of prison for 12 years. He did it all without violating probation or committing a new crime. After serving 16 years for armed robbery, I worked for 5 months as a furniture manufacturer from January 11, 2007 to May 15, 2007.

After being laid off due to slow requests for custom furniture, I looked for another job while doing personal shopping. 5 months later, not finding the job I was looking for, I entered a chain of pancake houses and applied for a job. This was my first year.

The manager asked, "What are you looking for? Can you cook or wait tables?"

While in prison I had learned 3

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I have been out of prison for 12 years. He did it all without violating probation or committing a new crime. After serving 16 years for armed robbery, I worked for 5 months as a furniture manufacturer from January 11, 2007 to May 15, 2007.

After being laid off due to slow requests for custom furniture, I looked for another job while doing personal shopping. 5 months later, not finding the job I was looking for, I entered a chain of pancake houses and applied for a job. This was my first year.

The manager asked, "What are you looking for? Can you cook or wait tables?"

While in prison, I learned 3 different computer languages ​​and was a tutor in computers, life skills, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, first aid, and jewelry making. My title was "Program Services Assistant." One of my duties as part of this job was database design and data entry, and I was very good at it.

I looked at the manager and said, "I know how to wash dishes and I need a job, I worked in the prison kitchens and you won't regret it." The manager looked at me, looked at my resume worth $ 50,000 salary. "43 is a bit older for a dishwasher, let me see if I can get you to pay more." He went and talked to the regional manager, came back and said, "how does 11 bucks sound?"

I worked at that restaurant part time for 400 a month, taking the bus when I can. Because the other dishwashers were teenagers, they couldn't work after 9:30 p.m. M. And they had to be at school the morning I filled up, which made me earn more money. While not working, he would take the bus for job interviews. After 5 months my phone rang.

"How would you like to work for the Alaska Food Bank?" "I would love to work there, giving back is what I do."

I walked into the interview and they asked me, "What does the program services assistant do?" I went ahead and explained the database I had created that tracked every order of inmates, the materials they have in their craft supplies, every education class they took. , their race, waiting lists that automatically shuffled the next inmate on a list into their chosen hobby. The database also kept track of inmate orders, cost, and totals for every penny they spent.

When I finished, they looked at each other with a twinkle in their eyes and explained that they were looking for a data manager and decided that the new title should be "Program Services Assistant."

I worked there from March 2008 to April 2015. I stayed at 12.50 and the board of directors gave me a raise, 4.60 was all they came up with. The directors insisted on finding money to pay me more. After a year I was given the title of Inventory Specialist, it was a new title for the organization. I was asked to clean up the inventory that consisted of 6 million pounds of food a year and provided supplemental food to 190,000 Alaskans. After 3 months I was asked to take over customer service at the warehouse. When I left, I was the facilities and equipment supervisor. As a customer service representative, I increased cash flow by 50,000 for the first 6 months. I personally handled and touched 6 different federal food programs. As a facilities supervisor I saved the organization over 14,000 a month by reducing unnecessary contracts and optimizing delivery operations. Before I left, I provided valuable information on deliveries and the weight delivered by each truck by collecting 3-year data and analyzing each impression. It took me 3 days to do what some thought was not possible. The report was turned over to the state legislature which awarded us $ 240,000 for new trucks. It took me 3 days to do what some thought was not possible. The report was turned over to the state legislature which awarded us $ 240,000 for new trucks. It took me 3 days to do what some thought was not possible. The report was turned over to the state legislature which awarded us $ 240,000 for new trucks.

There were tears the day I left, not because of what I had done, but because of what I had become.

The last 3 years they found me at home in my village, working as an EMS coordinator. He had organized a team of volunteer firefighters to build a professional fire department. I was trained among the best firefighters and I am one of 22 specially trained firefighters on board ships in the state of Alaska. I have provided life-saving measures, including the suppression of an armed suicide bomber while I was unarmed. I have assisted and coordinated medical, search and rescue, saved homes from fires.

I think the sky is the limit.

Many automotive related companies have high paying jobs and if it is not a "felony if you understand me" these companies often do not care about criminal records.

There are a lot of different jobs put together in the automotive business, particularly selling, repairing, etc. of used cars.

I'm sure there are plenty of other industries that will potentially hire a crook as well, but this one is worth considering because there are so many different ways to make money from used cars and I'm not trying to disparage "car guys" because I don't I am a used car salesman and a criminal, but being a criminal is not extremely

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Many automotive related companies have high paying jobs and if it is not a "felony if you understand me" these companies often do not care about criminal records.

There are a lot of different jobs put together in the automotive business, particularly selling, repairing, etc. of used cars.

I'm sure there are plenty of other industries that will potentially hire a crook as well, but this one is worth considering because there are so many different ways to make money from used cars and I'm not trying to disparage "car guys" because I don't I am a used car dealer and a criminal, but being a criminal is not very frowned upon or uncommon in this industry, especially if you are a drug crime offender.

It's worth noting that many of the high-paying jobs in the auto industry are very stressful because the pay structure is generally commission-based and fluctuates significantly throughout the year, so it can turn some people back to substance abuse.

Hope someone sees this and helps them.

Sincerely, Kenneth

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