What can I do to get a job in software development quickly? I am 22 years old and looking to learn how to develop software to get a job in the next 12 months. What learning track will allow me to get a job quickly?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Aidan Kane



What can I do to get a job in software development quickly? I am 22 years old and looking to learn how to develop software to get a job in the next 12 months. What learning track will allow me to get a job quickly?

I did this when I was about your age in that time period.

Here were my steps:

  1. be sure to write well with all your fingers before you even begin. Somehow I had escaped from college (majoring in English) pecking chickens. First, I spent a few months learning how to write correctly through free online games.
  2. Take some free online courses on the fundamentals of computer science. At that time (8 years ago) I took MIT's Computer Science 101 free online through EdX. This class taught me the basics of Python and what computers can and cannot do. This was around 3 months. Then I did an introduction to datab
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I did this when I was about your age in that time period.

Here were my steps:

  1. be sure to write well with all your fingers before you even begin. Somehow I had escaped from college (majoring in English) pecking chickens. First, I spent a few months learning how to write correctly through free online games.
  2. Take some free online courses on the fundamentals of computer science. At that time (8 years ago) I took MIT's Computer Science 101 free online through EdX. This class taught me the basics of Python and what computers can and cannot do. This was around 3 months. Then I did an introduction to databases through Stanford, also free online through EdX, also 3 months. Both are doable while maintaining a day job. Knowledge of databases and SQL in particular are very useful for any backend web development job.
  3. Now after you've taken some free classes and written some code and learned some fundamentals, if you still want to be a programmer and haven't gone crazy over the minutiae of all of this, spend some money and take a development boot camp. Web. . I recommend learning Rails, Django, React, and / or Node. This will be something like 3 to 6 months of your life and it will probably be what you do with it. Most of the people in my class are probably not using what we learned because they couldn't keep up with the class. It will be very challenging and you will learn a lot very quickly, but if you work hard and keep up, you may be able to find an entry-level job afterward.
  4. I was very lucky and had a project manager for a major company in my class who thought I was talented and gave me my first contract job right out of boot camp. I have been happily (albeit rigorously and with a steep learning curve) hiring myself ever since.
  5. If you're not so lucky to get some kind of bootcamp job, my best advice is to keep coding in whatever way you can while still applying for any web developer job and possibly creating a freelance profile on something like UpWork to test. to find entry-level jobs. Create a personal web application that helps you with some part of your life. Help a friend's business with a little free work; just keep coding or you will lose the skills you learned. I also recommend any online course on data structures and algorithms as these may be parts of job interviews that you probably haven't been exposed to, and a basic networking course if you are working on the internet (I borrowed a friend's networking school book to learn the basics). It will be helpful in all web development work to have a basic idea of ​​how the web works;)

If you go the contractor's job route, it won't be all rainbows and big paychecks. It will be terrible to estimate work time to start and you probably won't earn much as a result. After my initial job with the bootcamp project manager, I got a job at ODesk (eventually acquired by Upwork) that ended up paying around $ 12 per hour. But it kept me coding and learning and I got my foot in the door.

Entry-level positions are becoming more and more competitive, but there will be a great need for good developers with 5+ years of work experience for a long time. Keep going and in time you will be able to find the career you were dreaming of.

Do you know what we call someone with a Computer Science degree with 3-4 years of academic programming experience?

Basic level.

If you start now, are highly motivated, think naturally like a programmer, and become good at a programming language by then, you may have a chance to get an internship or entry-level position in a development-related field. . where the company will spend the next 18 to 24 months paying to teach you how to do it right.

It's not as simple as "learn a programming language, do some tutorials, and I'm ready for a job."

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Do you know what we call someone with a Computer Science degree with 3-4 years of academic programming experience?

Basic level.

If you start now, are highly motivated, think naturally like a programmer, and become good at a programming language by then, you may have a chance to get an internship or entry-level position in a development-related field. . where the company will spend the next 18 to 24 months paying to teach you how to do it right.

It's not as simple as "learn a programming language, do some tutorials, and I'm ready for a job."

It takes me 18-24 months to bring someone with already available programming skills from courses, schools, and / or years of self-study so that I can write code in a professional setting under supervision. I am not running development projects or being an architect, but someone I will give a snippet of a development assignment and will be reviewing their commitments all the time to see how they are doing and provide feedback.

Two years to get the point, I'll be trusting you with little things.

It will take you another five years to get to the point where you will be entrusted with developing small applications with requirements defined by someone else. It takes five to ten years, and in many cases never, to get to the point where you are providing the designs and requirements to others.

Are you ready to spend a tough 12 months learning basic skills? I mean "hard". If after six months of learning Python or Java and I ask you to write a console-based Hangman game complete with loading words from a file and proper game loop and error checking (that is, keep track of of the guessed letters), could you do it from scratch? If the answer is "I don't know where to start or I can't find an example on Stack Overflow", you're done. You are not cut out for this job.

It is not as simple as learning a programming language or five. Too many people think that if you spend three months doing a Python or Java tutorial, you are suddenly a competent programmer. You are not. See Hangman above. If you haven't sat down and tried to write something original using the snippets of knowledge collected in those tutorials to apply the concepts in unfamiliar ways, you haven't learned anything. Collecting different syntax for the same problems will not change that.

If you cannot learn to think like a programmer and break down a problem into ever finer levels of detail, details that do not occur in the real world but do occur in code, you will never prosper in this job. Sure you will get a job writing code, but you will never be its teacher. You will be a scribe copying snippets of code that you know, but will never be good. Writing code for problems solved by others and simply translating the words.

12 months of hard work can get you to this point. 24 months is more realistic. And that just gets you to the point where you might have a chance to break into entry-level.

But if you are not writing original code in the process, your probability is zero. There is no fast track for this. You must write code. It is not code that others have given you to fill in a couple of blanks. New, original code, which you have never seen in the description of a given problem. The only way to be successful in this field is to do it. You cannot read or study your way.

Although I understand people's superiority complex when it comes to being an experienced and competent developer ... I also find a problem with that.

For people who had not originally designated development as their "path", returning to full-time education for 4 years to learn the intricacies of computer science is unrealistic. I think getting to a point where a company can take you under their wing and turn you into a good developer is much faster than this.

The first thing I would be seeing (very recently I entered my first junior developer role) would be basic web development from Udemy

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Although I understand people's superiority complex when it comes to being an experienced and competent developer ... I also find a problem with that.

For people who had not originally designated development as their "path", returning to full-time education for 4 years to learn the intricacies of computer science is unrealistic. I think getting to a point where a company can take you under their wing and turn you into a good developer is much faster than this.

The first thing I would be looking at (very recently I entered my first junior developer role) would be a basic udemy / codecademy web development course (alternatives available). Make sure you really enjoy thinking about code and writing code. If you spend the first hours, happy days. I cannot comment on many languages ​​as I used the cliche javascript path in employment.

If you were to find your first few hours of coding, you'd be looking at javascript and its corresponding frameworks (react / angular 8 / vue) as your entry to the industry with the least resistance.

You need two things to enter the industry

  1. Good skills
  2. Good image

The first is accumulated by doing tutorials, watching talks about what technology there is and doing personal projects.

2. It's about proving that you have the skills and that a recruiter wouldn't be embarrassed proposing you to a company. Also get a LinkedIn profile with a nice professional photo of yourself. Set up a github account, upload your stuff and DOCUMENT IT to explain your development process and your thought process.

You no longer need to attend college for 3-5 years; it's just another aspect of your image. Northeast

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You need two things to enter the industry

  1. Good skills
  2. Good image

The first is accumulated by doing tutorials, watching talks about what technology there is and doing personal projects.

2. It's about proving that you have the skills and that a recruiter wouldn't be embarrassed proposing you to a company. Also get a LinkedIn profile with a nice professional photo of yourself. Set up a github account, upload your stuff and DOCUMENT IT to explain your development process and your thought process.

You no longer need to attend college for 3-5 years; it's just another aspect of your image. Newcomers who show great potential are extremely valuable because they will become productive with guidance and cannot negotiate because they think they are worthless. Feed this notion at first; They seem to be smart but innocent and naive.

Never stop working at 1. and 2. Start working at 3. once you get your first job and are comfortable with prospering and succeeding. 3. is to know what you are worth, how to negotiate and know how to play.

Good luck! I hope you go far!

Let me see if I got it right: you now have no coding experience and expect to land a software development job in 12 months.

You have never been interested in coding in the last 10 years, even if there are a variety of free training, coding tools, books, videos, etc.

If so, I have bad news for you: it will take you much more than a year to reach a level of competition where people will want to hire you. Most importantly, if you haven't been curious enough to study coding by now, chances are you don't like coding. And the problem is that you will compete with people who love coding and

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Let me see if I got it right: you now have no coding experience and expect to land a software development job in 12 months.

You have never been interested in coding in the last 10 years, even if there are a variety of free training, coding tools, books, videos, etc.

If so, I have bad news for you: it will take you much more than a year to reach a level of competition where people will want to hire you. Most importantly, if you haven't been curious enough to study coding by now, chances are you don't like coding. And the problem is, you will be competing with people who love coding and started doing it when they were teenagers or even earlier. Employers will always prefer to hire someone who is passionate about coding rather than someone who simply considers it a high-paying job.

It depends on your location and your background, if it is some kind of STEM (not CS) degree in a country like Russia or Ukraine, you can study yourself around 6 months and be on par with the average fresh CS degree due to a level terrible about college education. If you are not from STEM, it is much more difficult to persuade people to give you a chance, if you do not have a degree, the chances of finding a job are really low!

The most widespread jobs are some kind of web, search the job posting networks in your area and find which stack is popular, I guess it will be PHP, Java Spring, Python Flask / Django, C #

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It depends on your location and your background, if it is some kind of STEM (not CS) degree in a country like Russia or Ukraine, you can study yourself around 6 months and be on par with the average fresh CS degree due to a level terrible about college education. If you are not from STEM, it is much more difficult to persuade people to give you a chance, if you do not have a degree, the chances of finding a job are really low!

The most widespread jobs are some kind of web, search the job posting networks in your area and find which stack is popular, I guess it will be PHP, Java Spring, Python Flask / Django, C # ASP.NET | Open source web framework for .NET or Ruby on Rails for backend and React / Vue / Angular for frontend. Choose backend or frontend later if you need to learn another.

You are young and increase the chances of finding a job, I was 29 when I went from the position of Technical Support of Telecommunications (with CCNA) to Programming, I have a master's degree in Physics and it was really very difficult to get an interview (1 in 10) 15 applications ). Later I found out that I am good even compared to people who have 1.5-2 years of IT experience or recent computer science graduates. Check my other answer: Artiom Kozyrev's answer to What is the current salary of a programmer in Moscow?

It's nice to have time-bound goals, but it also sounds like, “I need money fast. The software makes a lot of money, right? ”. Look inside. Do some "hello world" stuff in a language of your choice (like python) and see if it "causes joy" to borrow a term. If you don't feel excited when you hit Enter and see something you typed running, even if it's basic, then it's not right for you. You need a serious push to get into this and that usually just comes from an innate desire that you have within you. I'm not saying no. You may never have had a chance to find out. But the sooner you find

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It's nice to have time-bound goals, but it also sounds like, “I need money fast. The software makes a lot of money, right? ”. Look inside. Do some "hello world" stuff in a language of your choice (like python) and see if it "causes joy" to borrow a term. If you don't feel excited when you hit Enter and see something you typed running, even if it's basic, then it's not right for you. You need a serious push to get into this and that usually just comes from an innate desire that you have within you. I'm not saying no. You may never have had a chance to find out. But the sooner you find out, the better it will be.

You can try a coding bootcamp like Make School or AppAcademy. I can't personally vouch for this, but I have seen people succeed after graduation.

The lowest barrier to entry fields would be web or mobile development.

If you're motivated, you can definitely land a software development position in 12 months or even less.

Good luck!

Pick 1 programming language, it can be Java / C / Python, make sure you go over all the basics in whatever topic you choose and you can do some work if you can do this. To go further, have a basic conception about databases, algorithms, DS. That's enough for a newcomer to get a job in the next 3-4 months. Apply in as many company as possible.

Python has many good points, but it can never be anything more than a highly functional programming language. It has uses in front-end development, but is actually a very clever abstraction above what is considered to be fundamental programming languages. These include C, C ++, and Java. C # is fine as long as you only work in the .NET world; otherwise you will need to include proprietary libraries and rebuilt bloat to run elsewhere.

The minimum skill set is not simply learning a language and relying on luck. You need to have access to OO, functional programming, software architecture, and a

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Python has many good points, but it can never be anything more than a highly functional programming language. It has uses in front-end development, but is actually a very clever abstraction above what is considered to be fundamental programming languages. These include C, C ++, and Java. C # is fine as long as you only work in the .NET world; otherwise you will need to include proprietary libraries and rebuilt bloat to run elsewhere.

The minimum skill set is not simply learning a language and relying on luck. You need to have gotten into OO, functional programming, software architecture, and a host of other areas to be truly marketable. You need to know how computers work at their fundamental level, the fact that machine cycles are still important, especially if you want your system to be fully scalable and distributed.

It is not enough to say that I have written a useful application for my iPhone, software like any engineering discipline requires fundamental knowledge. Unfortunately, there are very few academic institutions that offer truly useful computer engineering degrees, and in fact, computer science and software engineering should be separated as the same discipline because they are no longer. I have a master's degree in computer science and it taught me practically nothing that was relevant to my later employment. The only useful thing was learning to code and that depended on my research and reading because the teaching was terrible.

I know this sounds pessimistic and it is, but there are too many time wasters in software engineering supported by talented programmers. If you really want to get into programming professionally, learn C ++, Java, relational database technology, and machine hardware basics. Then get that degree in Computer Science so you can show employers that you have a degree in it. But don't expect the title to be of much help in teaching you about the needs of the industry because it won't. That's my best advice and forget about Python. It's okay for what it does and it's good to know, but that's all I would do.

Some of these answers are out of touch with my experience. I say do it. I went from having relatively zero programming knowledge to a job as a back-end web developer in a span of about 7 months, I don't consider myself a prodigy by any means. I make, with adjustments based on the cost of living, the approximate equivalent of 80 to 100,000 in SF.

Context: I have a degree in physics from a relatively well regarded university, but I was a solid B student. I took an introductory Python course five years ago that really didn't leave me with anything you can't understand in a day. I had not programmed more than the worst spagh

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Some of these answers are out of touch with my experience. I say do it. I went from having relatively zero programming knowledge to a job as a back-end web developer in a span of about 7 months, I don't consider myself a prodigy by any means. I make, with adjustments based on the cost of living, the approximate equivalent of 80 to 100,000 in SF.

Context: I have a degree in physics from a relatively well regarded university, but I was a solid B student. I took an introductory Python course five years ago that really didn't leave me with anything you can't understand in a day. He hadn't scheduled more than the worst spaghetti until February. Now I'm working with Node, learning Angular, but I'm more proficient in API design and architectural stuff than front-end.

I studied programming online and built my own projects while doing research full time for a master's program in physics. It was intense and at times depressing, especially when I started looking for work. The most important advice I can give you is to find others who know more than you and screw them up a lot. Ask questions, take notes as they talk, be brutally honest with yourself if you don't understand something. The most important thing is to know when you are wasting your time. Don't worry about completing a 100% online course, get what you need and keep going. The sooner you are done with the hand holding a course offered to you, the better. Get out of that comfort zone the second you can and look at any course as a reference to fall back on and never as a set of instructions to follow blindly.

Good luck! The industry is booming right now, it appears that the threshold of competition required to be hired is dropping as demand increases. Get in while the bubble is still bright!

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