What autistic traits get you fired from a job?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Louis Johnston



What autistic traits get you fired from a job?

Content

  1. Utility as justification
  2. Example (story)
  3. Labels and their effect on autistic self-esteem
  4. Factors that cause people with autism to be fired
  5. Overcome accumulated sensitivity to rejection
  6. Conclusion and signature

I wrote more than I expected. So I broke things down into topics for your own reading convenience. Hope the organizing effort has helped.

In any case, we're going to remove it, partially staged spiel, goooooo.


Utility as justification

Being fired as a person with autism is usually due to a failure in your high levels of personal performance. The factor many neurotypical people cite as neurodivergent

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Content

  1. Utility as justification
  2. Example (story)
  3. Labels and their effect on autistic self-esteem
  4. Factors that cause people with autism to be fired
  5. Overcome accumulated sensitivity to rejection
  6. Conclusion and signature

I wrote more than I expected. So I broke things down into topics for your own reading convenience. Hope the organizing effort has helped.

In any case, we're going to remove it, partially staged spiel, goooooo.


Utility as justification

Being fired as a person with autism is usually due to a failure in your high levels of personal performance. The factor that many neurotypical people cite neurodivergent people as an attempt to motivate or congratulate them, oblivious to the implication that their breath traces. That neurodivergent people must obtain a justification for their existence.

It is no wonder that a constantly rotating cycle of marathons of exertion followed by exhaustion is constant in the psychology of people with autism who are able to earn a living in the workforce.

This justification will also be related to the reason why a person with autism will be fired. I will go through a generalized example.


Example

A problem will arise in their personal life and their cycle of sprint burnout sprint that was enough to maintain a justification to keep them engaged will have energy depleted by this external circumstance. Their performance will suffer at work and social and communication problems will be more apparent without superhuman levels of performance balancing it.

This will make the factors of disharmony that the person with autism imparts to the social tapestry of the workplace more severe. Autistic overwhelming and sensory overload will become more common occurrences.

So if your overall usefulness can be replaced by someone else without these issues, then the prospect of eliminating this inexplicable disharmony can be rectified with a minimum of fuss, then it will be.

Discord will be questioned. The autistic person can keep his job if his personal circumstances are serious enough to explain the related increase in the severity of his stress. Or if the intensity of the event and your increased stress are out of proportion, the difference can be bridged with an apology and a promise to do better in the future. Although this apology and promise only works once.

If the stressful time is after the promise and apology, your time spent at that workplace may have come to an end.

Employer: ”Why have you reacted to your co-workers with this negative tone and why have you made this fatal mistake at work?

Person with autism: "I'm sorry, I don't know why."


Labels and their effect on autistic self-esteem

The person with autism in the example was unwilling to admit the fact that he was experiencing autism due to the stigma of the label and many other negative effects.

Most people in the workplace are not personally affected by autism in any way and get most of their information about it from budget-minded news shows or worse rumors and cultural attitudes. In this way a public label to explain their behavior that causes them social difficulty is a case that the cure is worse than the disease.

People are quite familiar with the negative effects of labels. In the example, we saw a way that when autism labels were not applied, behaviors were attributed to the person's moral caliber.

The positive effects of a label are less understood.

I consider a public announcement of an autism label to be optional and situational. However, I consider a personal and private autism label essential.

If the person with autism does not have an autism diagnostic framework, they will still accumulate labels.

"Stupid, rude, stubborn, strange, inconsiderate, slow, harsh, sensitive, useless and etc."

The response to these labels is to punish yourself and work harder, apologize and thank others for tolerating your broken and flawed presence. Neither of these efforts improves the things they struggle with, causing the person to suffer extraordinarily during their lifetime. With no one to blame but themselves.

Rather, another tag can replace all of these.

"Autism"

Instead, people's efforts can be leveraged to develop specific and effective strategies to help with the exact problems they are experiencing. Things can start to get better. Life can be better. Their label also connects them to an ocean of people who relate to and understand the things they suffer.

These are the positive effects of a label. A box, when applied correctly, allows the person to begin to learn to live again. A box that excludes the other labels that do nothing but harm for the simple reason that people who do not suffer from our understanding of the trials that the person with autism goes through.


Specific Factors Causing PWA Dismissal

However, in order of factors, communication skills will be cited as the main reason you were fired.

  • Frankness of tone and choice of words. Words chosen to save time and be easier to misinterpret that cause your message and your emotions to be misinterpreted
  • Not taking the perspectives of others into account in your decision making.
  • Not getting involved in conversations about decision-making processes.
  • Being slow to understand (and get frustrated by) the explanations of others due to lack of precision in the choice of words.
  • Being frustrated with others for not understanding anything you say. This is because the message is too precise in word choice and is expressed in a dense singular point spoken in 10 seconds (the problem arises because these concepts are usually broken down and thrown at people one piece at a time for 5 minutes)

Although the real reasons are the parts of the social impairment of autism.

  • Difficulty relating to others.
  • Do not talk or make friends.
  • Others feel uncomfortable around you and don't know how to interact.
  • No tone or inflection when speaking and very low volume. (The person with autism expects to be constantly misunderstood, and this energy becomes entangled with every word of expression and every piece of body language.)
  • Due to the expectation that the person with autism will not understand what he means by overexposure and explanation. The people you are talking to are so confused by this over-scaffolding that they often miss the message you are trying to convey. The person with autism does not usually see what was misinterpreted or why. What leads to an even more visible frustration that distances them even further from the social collective, I am the work environment.

Overcome accumulated sensitivity to rejection

Part of the difficulty that a person with autism has to relate is the accumulated sensitivity to rejection and social hypervigilance that he has been conditioned to maintain.

It's hard to break up to be honest. The person with autism has a trustworthy bank of experiences from their efforts to be understood, which complicates their efforts to be loved and accepted.

Some struggle and learn to accept sprint cycles of exhaustion even in their personal and social life.

Eventually they all end up fried enough to stop trying. Failing enough to numb her own desires to connect and get closer.

Cruelly, these same numbed desires serve as a mechanism to permanently close any human connection. When someone tries to connect with them, the hungry connection causes this desire to erupt into a flood of words and phrases and energy that usually scares the person trying to connect.

Knowing the process is the first step to change it.


Conclusion and signature

My answer got a bit out of hand from what I originally envisioned as a short answer.

In fact, I have been fired for several of these examples and traits, so you may know that I am basing this on my own experiences. It would be great if this resonated with others and I would invite and comment if this happened or not.

All the answers would be helpful to know how to help. Me and the others.

Getting fired from a job is just the tip of the iceberg of a bigger problem I've had my entire life:

BIG PROBLEM WITH AUTHORITY

To briefly set the stage for what came next, I must explain the problems I already had at school.

The first was at the age of three when the teacher lost patience with me and locked me in a closet for taking too long doing homework because I was being creative and trying to experiment with multi-colored finger paint instead of just stamping a dye. from my hand to the paper. I still remember the feeling of fear of being yelled at and fear in the dark.

I STILL

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Getting fired from a job is just the tip of the iceberg of a bigger problem I've had my entire life:

BIG PROBLEM WITH AUTHORITY

To briefly set the stage for what came next, I must explain the problems I already had at school.

The first was at the age of three when the teacher lost patience with me and locked me in a closet for taking too long doing homework because I was being creative and trying to experiment with multi-colored finger paint instead of just stamping a dye. from my hand to the paper. I still remember the feeling of fear of being yelled at and fear in the dark.

STILL LEAD PEOPLE BECAUSE I'M SLOW AND WILL DO THINGS MY OWN WAY.

Later, even though he was generally a very good student (except in sports due to dyspraxia), he would unknowingly push the teachers against me due to excessive eye contact: "He's looking at me in a creepy way" (le one said to my mom) or very little, “She's not paying attention at all. »

I had no idea, I was hit by that teacher who considered me INSUBORDINATE and STRANGE, even though I did the best I could (to be honest I was also hit at home because I was slow and daydreaming. The other kids excluded me and chose me on because it was strange).

These issues followed me into the workforce where the complaints were more or less an elaboration on the same topics.

They never fired me, but I quit a couple of times before they had to.

One time, because I was hired for a job, I bluffed my way through learning computer software overnight enough for the test assignment. But of course I ended up struggling because even though I am very quick to understand some technical things (computers, tools and craft processes), I am very slow to understand what is expected of me while using them.

THE WORK SHOULD BE REMOVABLE STEP BY STEP FOR ME, WITH AN EXAMPLE, TO COMPLETELY UNDERSTAND WHAT TO DO. Otherwise, I will eagerly make up everything I can, because I do not understand the implicit rules of the task ...

Then I WILL LOSE A LOT OF TIME TO VERIFY THE DETAILS THAT NOBODY WILL GIVE ACCOUNT DUE TO PERFECTIONISM ...

Being labeled slow and cheeky again, getting even more stressed due to negative feedback, trying harder and harder, giving up my body's natural needs (stress, insomnia, poor diet) until I get to BURNOUT. And the consequent depression.

Which is a huge deception to some employers who don't understand how I PERFORM ON SUCH INCONSISTENT LEVELS. I can be incredibly fast and efficient, even at a task that many people would find technical and boring, if I have simplified the process. At the same time I can experience bursts of creativity that are also sometimes appreciated (and sometimes seen as rebels who do not follow orders). However, other times I seem stupid and useless. I've been a huge deception to bosses who expected me to always have as intense a production as I can provide in my prime. Unfortunately, I am prone to anxiety and nervous breakdowns, allergies, and emotional / sensory overload that hinder my ability to function efficiently.

Finally, I HAVE HAD SOME SUPERIORS AS SOME TEACHERS THAT STOP ME FRANKLY. I have been harassed in the workplace. I guess it's because they felt I didn't respect their authority for all of the above. AND ALSO BECAUSE I'M FUCKING AT FLATTERY AND CUTTING THE POWERFUL. Sooner or later they realize that I only care about Art and I go to parties to get blindingly drunk and dance with impolite enthusiasm… Not polishing egos.

But to be honest, some employers and tutors have loved me too. Those who understand that I really want to work and just need A CLEAR DEFINITION OF THE TASKS AND THE AUTONOMY TO COMPLETE THEM MY WAY. People say that cats have Asperger's, which seems logical given the way they tend to do their thing ... But I also find that I have the devotion of a dog for someone who gives them positive encouragement, I like to be a ' good girl ”, I am desperate to be accepted and useful to society (which I achieve more with my actions than with my social graces). I suspect this is true for many people, not just the neurodivergent. It's a shame managers only seem to know how to reprimand. Yelling at me, as a child or as an adult, will only make me panic, freeze, and eventually

These days I work on my own, which is so much better for me since I can work my own strange schedule and process. I have no problem being disciplined and dedicated because I am an obsessive control freak and I love my job.

Hope this answer helps.

Two and a half years ago, the manager position was opened in my office.

In an informal conversation one day, everyone on the team expressed that we really did not want or need a manager to operate well.

My response to that was to write a formal proposal outlining all the reasons why we should have a shared leadership system in the team, what that new structure might look like, examples of how that system had been seen in other organizations, and how to do it. Uniformly reallocate the manager's salary to offset the increased responsibility for co-management. So, I have everyone else on team t

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Two and a half years ago, the manager position was opened in my office.

In an informal conversation one day, everyone on the team expressed that we really did not want or need a manager to operate well.

My response to that was to write a formal proposal outlining all the reasons why we should have a shared leadership system in the team, what that new structure might look like, examples of how that system had been seen in other organizations, and how to do it. Uniformly reallocate the manager's salary to offset the increased responsibility for co-management. Then, I had everyone else on the team sign it.

It seemed logical to me. Nobody on the team wanted a manager, there was another system that could be put in place to make people happier and happy employees to be more productive. Why do not do it?

The answer was a resounding no. If I hadn't already had a pre-established reputation for being competent but quirky, I could very easily have lost my job.

I use this as an example, because it sums up some of the many traits that I know I struggle with in the workplace. The first being

I tend to do things my way

As an adult, I have improved a lot in understanding social norms and expectations, but that doesn't mean I resonate with them.

My personal code of ethics boils down to damaging.

If breaking a social norm isn't going to hurt the people around me and I don't resonate with it, then I don't see any compelling reason to keep operating within its limits.

I will walk the road less traveled, because I feel more comfortable. I have noticed that some people find this threatening, even though I have not set out to be threatening.

However, I have learned in the workplace that it is sometimes necessary to conform for the sake of conformity. I suspect that this disgust or inability to adjust gets many autistic people in trouble at work, where it is often more socially convenient to keep your head down and go with the flow.

I have a different connection style and preference for solo work.

I like my coworkers, and I count some of them as friends, but I'm not attracted to hanging out in bars or social gatherings. I'm also not a fan of group work.

However, I will make the effort to connect in that way, because it is what you need to feel that you are close to me. It doesn't feel like closeness to me, but I've noticed that this feeling of closeness is more important than actually being close when navigating complicated social dynamics for neurotypical people.

Autistic people who cannot adapt to that need or who do not adapt to that need often end up excluded from the group and are given less leeway when problems arise.

I have a different communication style

I got a raise a few weeks ago. However, the way I got the raise got me in trouble. The organization I recently worked for re-grouped all salary ranges.

In a purely autistic way, I wrote an email detailing what I saw as all the logical inconsistencies with the new system when it was released. It made perfect sense to me. They had asked for comments and I was providing them. That was until my manager took me aside and let me know that while my email had valid points, it was too direct. It hadn't been my intention to attack anyone, so I apologized.

So, I got a raise. I'm still scratching my head about it. However, autistic people in the workplace may sometimes forget that the content of their communication may be less important to those around them than the style in which it is presented.

My work style doesn't always match workplace expectations

I am the first to admit that I have a big problem with constant production. Instead, I tend to go through periods of incredibly high, hyper-focused productivity, followed by periods of incredibly low or near zero productivity.

Fortunately, the amount of work I produce in periods of high productivity makes up for what I do not produce during periods of low productivity.

More importantly, my job is flexible enough that I can rearrange my days to fit in, but for people with autism in jobs that aren't that flexible, those periods of low productivity could get them fired.


In short, I will say that I am very fortunate to work for the organization that I do. The workforce is not known for being particularly friendly to those on the spectrum, and I know that I had a hard time landing a professional job.

I'm sure I'm biased considering that two of my siblings are also on the spectrum, but I think autistic people bring a lot and I hope to see more organizations making room for neurodivergent individuals.

I haven't been fired very often. Here's a list of things that almost cost me a job.

1) Traits: hyper-concentration, patience, pattern recognition, assuming others are looking at data or facts.

My performance was being judged entirely based on whether I "looked busy." Once they looked at my real numbers and productivity results, they saw that I was among the best. I almost got fired from a job because I seemed too calm doing it. I rearranged the workspace for efficient movement that made everything less hectic and sloppy, so my supervisor assumed I was doing less.

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I haven't been fired very often. Here's a list of things that almost cost me a job.

1) Traits: hyper-concentration, patience, pattern recognition, assuming others are looking at data or facts.

My performance was being judged entirely based on whether I "looked busy." Once they looked at my real numbers and productivity results, they saw that I was among the best. I almost got fired from a job because I seemed too calm doing it. I rearranged the workspace for efficient movement that made everything less hectic and sloppy, so my supervisor assumed I was doing less. When I asked the big boss to look at the productivity metrics, they were higher than ever. That's the only thing that saved me. Otherwise, they would have fired me because they assumed I was being too slow.

2) Traits: Honesty, Clear and explicit communication style, Non-judgmental, Slow to understand subtext.

When asked for my "honest opinion" or "What do you think of this?" I was thoughtful and gave them some thoughtful comments. What I learned later is that I'm supposed to immediately say, "Yeah, that's a great idea," or else provide support without question. If someone really wants my opinion, they will ask for it in another way. They will say, “I want you to go through this with a fine tooth comb and find all possible shortcomings or difficulties. Then give me your honest opinion. "

3) Traits: cooperation, depth, naivety, lack of concern for the manufactured social hierarchy.

When I took on more responsibility in a workplace, being a project manager or working on projects on my own, it took a lot for me to get people to steal credit for my ideas. They simultaneously undermined my perceived value as an employee with rumors and gossip. I have to strain to notice when people are being manipulative or backstabbing.

It has been a long and arduous process of learning to handle superficial impressions. For me it was a revelation that most people value superficiality, positioning and posture more than the truth and depth of what is really happening.

I learned to share less, to be less helpful with co-workers, and to hide data in my progress reports. I keep the cards close to my vest as long as possible to receive more credit in the final presentation.

I learned to measure time when I reveal the results of progress to get something close to adequate credit. It has to do with realizing how easily most people are distracted and how quickly they judge. The first 3 seconds of an email, presentation, or conversation has to go a certain way or I've already missed it.

Social interaction, sensory problems, lack of structure, lack of expectations, lack of understanding of others, lack of skills, lack of training and burnout. This is for us, those of us with autism and those of us who are normal. The biggest problem is that we have this disability called autism and they see us as different people and we see ourselves as different. We also see those without autism as different and confused. Almost as if they were there to see us and we were just there, but in our own world. I just don't understand it and the professionals don't understand us. Is to see

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Social interaction, sensory problems, lack of structure, lack of expectations, lack of understanding of others, lack of skills, lack of training and burnout. This is for us, those of us with autism and those of us who are normal. The biggest problem is that we have this disability called autism and they see us as different people and we see ourselves as different. We also see those without autism as different and confused. Almost as if they were there to see us and we were just there, but in our own world. I just don't understand it and the professionals don't understand us. It is very difficult. If you look at it, autism seems not to be real. It looks like someone who has schizophrenia but without the symptoms that the man marks in the dsm5. It really has similar effects. I do not' I have schizophrenia, I have autism. I've been learning about autism to better understand it and be like everyone else. I think it is a disability similar but equal to that of those with schizophrenia. I know I got off topic and it's just us being different.

How schizophrenia is autism, I have no way of putting it into words. But if you look at someone who has schizophrenia. They are lost in their own heads. They have this imaginary world. Their heads can do things that all people without schizophrenia cannot. They see things and hear things that no one else can do.

People with autism are not like that. But if you look at us, we are described as if we were in our own world. It is said that we have no interest in others. We are described as being alone. If people enter our world, we share our interests with them. Only then with therapy do we overcome autism. So if you take the discrimination of someone suffering from hallucinations and isolation and the world of autism itself. You have a connection. People who have hallucinations see, hear, and experience things in their own world. As much as we with autism are out of sync with the real world that everyone experiences.

People with autism have sensory issues and trouble sorting things out based on how we experience our world to be. Someone who has schizophrenia is overrated for their senses that no one else can experience. They have a different type of stimulus. Someone who has schizophrenia can only be the person experiencing these stimuli. People with autism experience what everyone else experiences as sensory input, but it can be overwhelming or unpleasant. Autism shares the same stimuli as those without autism and schizophrenia. Those with schizophrenia can only experience their own stimuli that their brain produces.

So you have autism and schizophrenia symptoms that overlap with each other. But with different forms of stimuli. Someone with autism in contact with the outside world in which everyone lives. Someone with schizophrenia is in contact with the outside world and is still present. It basically means that everyone just needs to understand and accept other people who are different. Like the different skin types and gender.

“What autistic traits get you fired from your jobs?

Stick with what you think is the right way to do something and refuse to take the shortcuts the boss wants done.

Conflict of personal principles with what is considered professional behavior, such as misrepresenting a situation in the interest of the employer or promoting a particular product.

Another is to do things according to your own logic, which the boss doesn't understand, even when you explain it.

It may be that your social difficulties make people think you are lying or cheating on them when you are just nervous. (That may be a pair

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“What autistic traits get you fired from your jobs?

Stick with what you think is the right way to do something and refuse to take the shortcuts the boss wants done.

Conflict of personal principles with what is considered professional behavior, such as misrepresenting a situation in the interest of the employer or promoting a particular product.

Another is to do things according to your own logic, which the boss doesn't understand, even when you explain it.

It may be that your social difficulties make people think you are lying or cheating on them when you are just nervous. (That can be an even bigger problem when dealing with the police and judges, but that's another story.)

Another is the common mistake autistic people make, thinking they are there to get the job done. Neurotypical people, on the other hand, see social relationships as the most important part of the job. This leads, not only to resentment, but to a loss of communication in the workplace, and the autistic person loses key information.

Crises can lead, not only to possible instant dismissal, but also to accusations of bullying and other ignorant interpretations.

This happened to me once, before I was diagnosed (I was diagnosed quite late in life). He worked for Xerox, in their division that outsourced customer service. I was a quality analyst for the travel website Hotwire (the person who listens to calls and helps agents get better at their jobs). Anyway, I applied for a job as a supervisor and had an interview with two people. I was later told that I didn't get the job due to my eye contact issues (the manager I interviewed said something like, my agents couldn't trust me if I couldn't maintain eye contact). . That

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This happened to me once, before I was diagnosed (I was diagnosed quite late in life). He worked for Xerox, in their division that outsourced customer service. I was a quality analyst for the travel website Hotwire (the person who listens to calls and helps agents get better at their jobs). Anyway, I applied for a job as a supervisor and had an interview with two people. I was later told that I didn't get the job due to my eye contact issues (the manager I interviewed said something like, my agents couldn't trust me if I couldn't maintain eye contact). . It was quite disappointing!

Definitely taking things too literally and not knowing the unspoken rules that everyone else seems to know, but no one told you. I was almost fired from an aquarium job (as a teenager), because we were told to tell a certain supervisor if we ever saw a dead fish in one of the tanks. I saw a dead fish one day, so I got on my radio and told the guy there was a dead fish. Then I found out that I wanted to get fired because I had been talking to some important visitors at the time and I didn't want them to find out (? Why don't people believe that fish will ever die?). Apparently I was supposed to

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Definitely taking things too literally and not knowing the unspoken rules that everyone else seems to know, but no one told you. I was almost fired from an aquarium job (as a teenager), because we were told to tell a certain supervisor if we ever saw a dead fish in one of the tanks. I saw a dead fish one day, so I got on my radio and told the guy there was a dead fish. Then I found out that I wanted to get fired because I had been talking to some important visitors at the time and I didn't want them to find out (? Why don't people believe that fish will ever die?). Apparently he was supposed to use a phone, not the radio, and leave a discreet message asking him to contact me so I could tell him privately. Only that was never part of the instructions; they literally just said "tell that guy if this happens",

It could be a breach of written or unwritten rules that seem illogical to a person on a spectrum and seem obvious or obvious to a supervisor, so they don't feel compelled to point it out to the employee.

Here is an example. Everyone in the office started work around 8:30 and left at 5. To avoid rush hour traffic and reinforcements in the garage, I would come in at 9 and leave at 5:30. My job didn't involve talking to clients. As a creative inventor, you couldn't do more work working longer hours. A coworker complained that he was late for work. They canned me.

The main trait that causes high functioning autistic people to be fired from their roles is ignorance of office politics. In most jobs, production line activities are important, unfortunately many industries operate less efficiently due to the clique groups that disappointing managers foster.

Lack of knowledge and understanding of employers. However, this is no one's fault.

Most neurotypicals do not understand the neurodivergent brain. This means that they may not understand or appreciate how you work. This is not your fault or your bosses' fault. It is simply a lack of communication and education.

When you are employed, I advise you to talk about the way you work, to make sure that you are treated correctly in your role, and that you are correct in your job!

Hope this was easy to understand and helped you in some way.

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