What are the warning signs for exiting an insulting job interview?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Karsen Terrell



What are the warning signs for exiting an insulting job interview?

"What are the warning signs for exiting an insulting job interview?"

Well, if they insult me ​​directly, I'll get up and go. Aside from a direct insult, here are other reasons why you might consider leaving an interview:

  1. Exceptionally late than the scheduled time: arriving amicably and apologizing for being 5 minutes late is one thing, having someone sit for more than 30 minutes and entering with attitude is another. If you have to sit for more than 10 minutes without even a greeting, I would get up and leave.
  2. Hostile and unprofessional attitude, not in all interventions
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"What are the warning signs for exiting an insulting job interview?"

Well, if they insult me ​​directly, I'll get up and go. Aside from a direct insult, here are other reasons why you might consider leaving an interview:

  1. Exceptionally late than the scheduled time: arriving amicably and apologizing for being 5 minutes late is one thing, having someone sit for more than 30 minutes and entering with attitude is another. If you have to sit for more than 10 minutes without even a greeting, I would get up and leave.
  2. Unfriendly and Unprofessional Attitude: Not all interviewers are going to come and act like it's their birthday when you show up, but there is some formality to a proper handshake and greeting. This is your first interaction with them and the company, if they are not happy that you have come and grateful to have a good interview candidate, I see it as a red flag. I wouldn't come out when greeted, but if the attitude was consistent, I would seriously consider not accepting an offer, especially if this person is going to be your manager / supervisor.
  3. Questions that have nothing to do with paper, this one in particular has happened to me more than once. I once had an interview for a Java developer internship and the questions only consisted of port numbers, network protocols, and SQL statements. If you are asked something so far removed from the job description, you really should ask if your interviewer is aware of the role you are interviewing for.
  4. Make fun of your answers or experience: This can happen in any profession, I have heard many horror stories in almost all types of work, however, most of the time I hear about them in technical roles. Engineers are not always equipped with the best soft skills and those in managerial and human resource roles are not always the most technical. This can be challenging in interview preparation, especially when it is not clearly stated who you are interviewing with. God forbid you don't remember how to get through an inverted binary tree, some engineers will openly scoff if you go blank or just don't get the most optimized answer during the interview process.

I will say that these things are not the norm, and if you are faced with any such behavior, I would report it to your recruiter. I don't know of many companies where they agree that their interviewers are jerks to candidates.

Best of luck in your job search!

If an insulting job interview is going to turn out, these signs are common: -

  • Deliberately waiting a long time outside when you know or can see that the interviewer is not busy with something. This is almost always the first sign in my experience that the company is less likely to treat employees with consideration.
  • Make derogatory comments about you or your work experience. If the comments are explicit, then everything is clear enough, but the comments can also be quite veiled. Keep an eye out for the weather and a listening ear for this.
  • “It's physical, my oldest son. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction.
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If an insulting job interview is going to turn out, these signs are common: -

  • Deliberately waiting a long time outside when you know or can see that the interviewer is not busy with something. This is almost always the first sign in my experience that the company is less likely to treat employees with consideration.
  • Make derogatory comments about you or your work experience. If the comments are explicit, then everything is clear enough, but the comments can also be quite veiled. Keep an eye out for the weather and a listening ear for this.
  • “It's physical, my oldest son. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. Every vision meets an equal and opposite revision. Heh " - grandfather

Stand up and walk outside. Don't bother arguing or arguing. Your time is precious.

I've been through many interviews, interviewed many business candidates, and personally trained thousands for lucrative jobs. The only warning signs I can think of are….

  1. There is absolutely no chemistry or connection between the interviewer and the interviewee.
  2. Nothing seems to be working right
  3. Anything that focuses on the interviewer is negative
  4. The interviewer resorts to certain unprofessional tactics (use of words or actions)
  5. You have a very strong feeling or intuitive feeling that something is wrong.

If it's any of the above, I tell people, just go away. T

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I've been through many interviews, interviewed many business candidates, and personally trained thousands for lucrative jobs. The only warning signs I can think of are….

  1. There is absolutely no chemistry or connection between the interviewer and the interviewee.
  2. Nothing seems to be working right
  3. Anything that focuses on the interviewer is negative
  4. The interviewer resorts to certain unprofessional tactics (use of words or actions)
  5. You have a very strong feeling or intuitive feeling that something is wrong.

If it's any of the above, I tell people, just go away. There are a million jobs on the market. If you can't get along with the person or company for a few minutes, you will NEVER be able to sustain yourself and survive in the long run.

Getting a new job at a new company is like marrying a new person. If you don't feel like it's okay from the first step, it never will be.

If your heart, head, and instinct say no, learn to trust him.

Loy machedo

I would say not having a decent hunch, an unwelcoming manager, stepping into someone's office without an explanation (if they are not set up for a meeting), an unprofessional office, sarcastic comments, personal comments about their experience, pushing too much information staff, or just a stench of ramen in the office are reasons to politely complete the interview and leave. Still send a thank you note, and then or later at the time of the offer, politely decline the job. You never know who will land where, always be courteous. You never know if they will be in a position to interview you for a position that you

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I would say not having a decent hunch, an unwelcoming manager, stepping into someone's office without an explanation (if they are not set up for a meeting), an unprofessional office, sarcastic comments, personal comments about their experience, pushing too much information staff, or just a stench of ramen in the office are reasons to politely complete the interview and leave. Still send a thank you note, and then or later at the time of the offer, politely decline the job. You never know who will land where, always be courteous. You never know if they will be in a position to interview you for a position you want or if you may need to interview them.

If you feel insulted and are sure that the interviewer is not conducting their own psychological stress test, tell the person that you are uncomfortable with what is being said / alleged and that if that is the company culture, you are unwilling. to participate. Get up and go.

I have worked with some legendary executives who were known for their temper, abuse from their subordinates, and people who suffered humiliation for the opportunity to advance beyond their slavery. All the executives respected the people who stood up for their beliefs, but they also believed that they should be willing to take a bullet.

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If you feel insulted and are sure that the interviewer is not conducting their own psychological stress test, tell the person that you are uncomfortable with what is being said / alleged and that if that is the company culture, you are unwilling. to participate. Get up and go.

I have worked with some legendary executives who were known for their temper, abuse from their subordinates, and people who suffered humiliation for the opportunity to advance beyond their slavery. All the executives respected the people who stood up for their beliefs, but they also believed that they should be willing to take a bullet to show their personal loyalty.

Bait and switch games. In the case of the job you are interviewing for, they mistakenly tell you that you don't have the skills for it and try to sell you into accepting a lower-level position.

I came out of some job interviews, I especially remember these three cases:

The dehumanizing language school

They were interviewing me for a position as an English as a Foreign Language teacher at a language school. The academy itself was located in the upper part of the city and the salary was good. This language school, however, had its own teaching system, and if you worked there, you would have to follow those rules.

Everything seemed fine until they came up with “… and of course we always give them quiz-style assignments. No Essays - Who Would Bother Reading 20 Student Essays? Who cares, anyway, what they want to talk about

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I came out of some job interviews, I especially remember these three cases:

The dehumanizing language school

They were interviewing me for a position as an English as a Foreign Language teacher at a language school. The academy itself was located in the upper part of the city and the salary was good. This language school, however, had its own teaching system, and if you worked there, you would have to follow those rules.

Everything seemed fine until they came up with “… and of course we always give them quiz-style assignments. No Essays - Who Would Bother Reading 20 Student Essays? Anyway, who cares what they want to talk about? This was so bad in so many ways - you can't improve your language skills just by checking the correct answer on the test, you won't develop an English narrative if you are never invited to write stories and have them revised, and YES, I actually do care what people want to talk about. I got up and left, saying that I was afraid I would not agree with their "teaching" system.

The elegant company with exploitative salaries

Years later, she was going through interviews as a secretary or assistant in import-export, marketing, and other departments where she had experience. I can't really remember which of those two positions this company had openings at the time. I came to this huge office in a tall building, overlooking the city. Great views, solid but modern furnishings, pretty impressive setup. They made me wait more than half an hour before starting the interview, but they gave me a brochure about the company to review while I was waiting. It also seemed expensive: the quality of the paper itself, the good design ...

When we got to the interview, they were interested in my qualifications and my experience and said that I was going to be selected for the final round of interviews. Salary had never been mentioned, so I asked boldly as they had been giving all kinds of details about themselves and the success of the company. The pay sucked! It was already a low salary for the position itself, even worse considering the aura of luxury they were trying to express. As soon as they said how much they would be paying for this "crucial position in our company" I looked into their eyes one by one as if I couldn't believe what I had just heard, I said "I guess you spent too much on this table and now you can't pay a decent salary, ”she grabbed my bag and left.

The Horrible Jewelry Company You've Always Hated

During roughly the same period, I went through 2 rounds of interviews for a management assistant position in which they had not disclosed which company I was hiring. This happened quite frequently among international companies that hired in Barcelona over a given period, and I really don't know why these companies preferred to reveal their names only in the final rounds. Regardless, the job description was interesting and the pay this time was good. Several other things that I had on my priority list were also fulfilled: occasional flexibility in working hours if needed, few business trips as I am a single mother ... The interview ended with the recruiter happily shaking my hand and saying that I would call a possibly final round of interviews, where the company name would be revealed. She said, with a big smile, "I really can't tell you,

NO!!! I've always hated that company and that silly design! I almost screamed "You don't mean shit, do you?" and she smiled and nodded. I said, “Sorry, I couldn't work for them. Those designs are horrible! ”. And I left.

It's no wonder I'm having trouble making ends meet, but I've been working for 14 years at a research institution, doing the kind of work I love and with people I appreciate. I guess I won.

The least qualified person I interviewed and trained for a teaching position was a man who had a Ph.D. in Teaching English as a Second Language.

His PhD was verified. But during our teacher training week, we (the trainers / supervisors) were concerned about their "I know all this" attitude and their unwillingness to participate.

We include methods that work well in THIS (Thai) culture, and he had been in the country for only a few months, so he needed knowledge.

At the end of the week, each participant was asked to teach a real and observed class to our students. Dr. PhD considered this to be unreasonable, b

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The least qualified person I interviewed and trained for a teaching position was a man who had a Ph.D. in Teaching English as a Second Language.

His PhD was verified. But during our teacher training week, we (the trainers / supervisors) were concerned about their "I know all this" attitude and their unwillingness to participate.

We include methods that work well in THIS (Thai) culture, and he had been in the country for only a few months, so he needed knowledge.

At the end of the week, each participant was asked to teach a real and observed class to our students. Dr. PhD felt this was unreasonable, but had no choice if he wanted a position.

The supervisor who observed the class flatly stated that this man should NOT be teaching. He had ignored everything we had covered in training, he definitely had no gift for teaching, and he had been dismissive of students.

However, our boss, who also has a Ph.D., insisted that everything would be fine when Dr. PhD taught.

However, we, the coaches / supervisors, stuck together. Our boss was furious with us until the lead supervisor offered to work with Dr. PhD and would supervise another observation.

We knew this lead supervisor was a brat, so we didn't have much faith until he, too, came out of the second observation, totally shocked.

But the boss refused to listen. He called the man to let him know he had a job.

Dr. PhD was conceited and accepted the position as his due.

The boss did not get the thanks he expected. Instead, Dr. PhD said, “I will need a surrogate every Friday. I just don't do Fridays. "

All classes were Monday through Friday. He knew it from the first day he applied.

The boss tried to reason with him, but Dr. PhD wouldn't budge. He went out of work.

But the stoy did not end there.

The second in command of our office surprisingly received a call from a friend at the Ministry of Education, asking for Dr. PhD. We will never know why he put us as a reference.

Our 'second' strongly suggested that the Ministry not hire Dr. PhD, but his warning was dismissed due to the PhD.

They gave him a very generous three-year contract, not the usual one-year contract because, well, he had a Ph.D. and they didn't want to lose it.

However, after just a few months, they realized that they REALLY, REALLY wanted to 'lose' it but couldn't because of the contract. They sent him to 'hell' places (none of which would take him twice), to empty seminars, to teach subjects he knew nothing about, but refused to leave.

Three, very long years….

An interview should be a conversation, not an interrogation. It's a friendly "get to know you" session. But interviewers are not always aware of how their tone / body language is perceived. While there are some people who really shouldn't be interviewing (like egomaniacs who just want to appear smarter than everyone else), most interviewers take their work seriously and want to do a great job.

Some things to consider:

  • The interview is a crucial function in all organizations, but few companies provide formal training on how to interview outside of HR guidelines on what you cannot legally
Keep reading

An interview should be a conversation, not an interrogation. It's a friendly "get to know you" session. But interviewers are not always aware of how their tone / body language is perceived. While there are some people who really shouldn't be interviewing (like egomaniacs who just want to appear smarter than everyone else), most interviewers take their work seriously and want to do a great job.

Some things to consider:

  • The interview is a crucial function in all organizations, but few companies provide formal training on how to interview outside of HR guidelines on what you cannot legally say or ask in an interview. Therefore, most technical interviewers are clueless and have little experience interviewing someone. Your interviewer may have years of experience in your field, but has only interviewed a few people.
  • Few technical interviewers do this as their full-time job. Often it is someone who has been in the position who knows the job. Your interview is one of twelve things on your plate that day, squashed between meetings and other priorities. This is not how it should be, but that is the real world. A manager passed me a resume mid-morning and said "can you interview this guy today?" Or "can you interview these five candidates this week?"
  • Interviewers have bad days. I once made a technical phone screen for a guy and could literally hear him typing the question into a search engine. Out of curiosity, I opened my browser, typed the same question, and selected the first link. I was reading the response verbatim from the web page. I called him and hung up, quite angry. I was still angry 15 minutes later when I had to interview the next candidate, but I put on a happy face and did the interview instead of canceling it at the last minute. This candidate did much better and was hired. We became friends and years later, he told me that he thought I was an idiot in the interview. I apologized and we laughed about that today. But the experience made me even more aware of how he might appear in an interview.
  • People lie on their resumes and interviews don't go well. As a technical interviewer, my job is to sniff out the BS on the resume, not to play "dummy" with trivia. So I try to be really fair and select the questions that someone with experience should know. So the order of the questions looks like this:
    1. Level 200 question that the candidate should know.
    2. Much harder question than someone with real depth would know (level +400) If you answer correctly, we move on. The rest:
    3. Level 300 question, a bit more difficult than the first but not difficult.

If they miss the third question on topic A, that tells me a lot, as I'm trying to find the edges of what they know. For all focus areas (10-12) they should be able to answer the first question + 90% of the time and the follow-up 70% of the time. It's okay to be stumped and not know something. But if you miss every question in the first round, you're lying on your resume and wasting everyone's time.

Most seasoned interviewers have seen this so many times that you expect resumes to be BS, or at least very padded. Some guys just lie and make things up on the fly. I had a candidate to invent / trade technical terms and when I called him he said "well that's what they call it around here". I have also had two people in their twenties who claim to have more than 20 years of IT experience because they had a PC and a wireless network in their home since they were four years old.

That kind of behavior tends to make interviewers very skeptical. In my career, five candidates burst into tears in an interview because they were failing every question in the first round and it became very clear that they did not have the skill set that they said they had. I'm not proud of that, and it wasn't intentional. I wasn't trying to break them down, I just wanted to find out what they actually knew and asked even easier questions to determine if there was another job that would suit them better. I asked him "if you could design a job from scratch that took advantage of all your strengths, what would it look like?" and they could not answer. I asked "what questions did you expect me to ask you?" Like an easy throw on the plate. Unanswered.

I thought I was being fair, but sometimes I wonder (since the tech community is very close) if they thought I was being harsh or rude. Maybe they thought I was rubbing it off by asking really easy questions. I guess I'll never know.

Hope this was helpful.

Original question: Have you ever been to a job interview where the interviewer completely insulted and demoted you?

Yes. I worked at a large credit union in Sunnyvale as their online services manager. It was a good job with a good boss, so he hadn't been looking for a job.

One morning in June 1999, I was sitting at my desk minding my own business working on a project when my phone rang.

The person who called was a recruiter for a large international bank. He told me that they had just acquired an Internet-only bank. The HR person explained to me that they were rebuilding the senior team at this internet bank.

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Original question: Have you ever been to a job interview where the interviewer completely insulted and demoted you?

Yes. I worked at a large credit union in Sunnyvale as their online services manager. It was a good job with a good boss, so he hadn't been looking for a job.

One morning in June 1999, I was sitting at my desk minding my own business working on a project when my phone rang.

The person who called was a recruiter for a large international bank. He told me that they had just acquired an Internet-only bank. The HR person explained to me that they were rebuilding the senior team at this Internet bank, and said I would be a perfect fit as the new SVP of Marketing. He had "Online Banking" from Yahoo! and he found my name in articles related to online banking innovations.

He had a pretty good resume that included many ecommerce projects and had been vice president of marketing for ten years. He said the base salary would be around $ 300,000 a year, which was roughly three times the salary I was earning. So, I said I'd be interested in talking about it.

The HR person was very excited. He made an appointment to be interviewed by his boss, the Vice President of Human Resources. He gave me the name, phone number, date and time. A few days later, I called the number and asked for the vice president.

I was transferred to someone much less bubbly than the woman I had originally spoken to. Once I said who I was, the vice president indicated that she had never heard of me. She asked me why I was calling. I said that one of his colleagues had scheduled me to be interviewed for the SVP Marketing position.

I could hear through the phone that he was looking for my information on his computer. He finally found it.

“So you have a couple of degrees, have you worked in marketing, IT and operations, and are you applying for a senior vice president position here? Maybe I'm qualified for a junior project manager position, but even then, I don't know. "

I kept it cordial, but hung up the phone pretty quickly after that. I reminded him that they looked for me, not the other way around.

Epilogue: I read a few years later that the FDIC fired the entire top management team of that Internet bank. I doubt I could have made enough of a difference in that organization to keep regulators happy, but I'm very glad I didn't join that organization as a marketer or anything else.

If you are an expert (I mean a real expert) at reading body language, you can read how the interviewer reacts to your answers during the interview, but keep in mind that, in most employers, you will have to make an impression. positive in most cases. if not all, of the entire list of interviews. The decision to hire or not to hire is not usually a single person. Key signs of positive interview body language include smiling (even a small smile), eye contact (although many interviewers keep their heads down during the interview ...

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