What are the signs that a zoomed / online interview went wrong?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Sophia Macdonald



What are the signs that a zoomed / online interview went wrong?

The signs that your online interview went wrong would be the comments that the interviewer would share at the end of the demo. You may be asked to repeat the demonstration for the next day or so. During the interview, you may also find that the interviewer has lost interest in listening to you. All of this is enough for one to know that the interview went wrong.

Hello there,

The signs that your online interview went wrong would be the comments that the interviewer would share at the end of the demo. You may be asked to repeat the demonstration for the next day or so. During the interview, you may also find that the interviewer has lost interest in listening to you. All of this is enough for one to know that the interview went wrong.

These are out of memory and are the biggest issues, many of them also exhibited many issues that would not trigger a red light recommendation, but when combined with the big ones they add up to a "no hire" recommendation. Note that these are "do not hire" recommendations, not people who were not hired due to a declined offer or were not offered a position due to more than one acceptable candidate.

  1. Communication would have been a problem. (Heavily accented, reticent English)
  2. He had no track record demonstrating the required skills, when assessed in problem solving and quality control analytical skills, fai
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These are out of memory and are the biggest issues, many of them also exhibited many issues that would not trigger a red light recommendation, but when combined with the big ones they add up to a "no hire" recommendation. Note that these are "do not hire" recommendations, not people who were not hired due to a declined offer or were not offered a position due to more than one acceptable candidate.

  1. Communication would have been a problem. (Heavily accented, reticent English)
  2. He had no background demonstrating the required skills, when tested on problem solving and QA analytical skills, he failed to demonstrate technical knowledge and attention to detail.
  3. Prima Donna too arrogant and would never have stayed long at a company that wasn't geared towards the latest .com fashions and keep it fun.
  4. The resume was very good, but when asked about the skills listed as "A +", the candidate demonstrated a "D" level of knowledge.
  5. Too quiet. He would not have been an entrepreneur or able to work independently.
  6. Too stubborn, haughty. Very much like "I have a lot of complaints and I want everyone to hear them." Not a good fit for a company that has stained cubicles from 20 years ago and a boss who didn't want to hear it.
  7. He was unable to demonstrate a solid understanding of web technologies and object-oriented programming (advanced skills, phone screen would have eliminated basic skills).
  8. He was asked about remote job openings and proceeded to try to convince / explain to us that there is no reason not to have work from home several days a week.
  9. You answered a "greatness and weakness" question (asked by a co-worker) with the truth.
  10. Boy scout. We are often ordered to implement unsafe practices and cut expenses at this company I worked for (think unencrypted credit card numbers or obscure security). As a developer my job is to make sure the product manager / owners (to the extent they don't want to hear you) understand the risks of what you have chosen and implement based on the final call. You could say that this candidate would have resigned instead of implementing something that put millions of credit card numbers at risk and would not have been a good fit for the culture. And yes, you could argue that the rest of us should have quit and saved our souls too, but we are talking about a job market that is over 50% South Asian (Desi) developers,

Less formality. More trying to tie you down.

  1. They deviate from the script. When the interview is very formal, it follows all the accepted standards for that specific stage of the interview, mostly there are questions about me and a very written block of information about the position and the company, I feel like I am one of the many candidates, and I do not enjoy any particularity. preference.
  2. They go to the next stage within the same interview. They reveal more about the position and the company than is strictly necessary for that stage of the interview. As if they want me to evaluate the information against my expectations and start making a decision.
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Less formality. More trying to tie you down.

  1. They deviate from the script. When the interview is very formal, it follows all the accepted standards for that specific stage of the interview, mostly there are questions about me and a very written block of information about the position and the company, I feel like I am one of the many candidates, and I do not enjoy any particularity. preference.
  2. They go to the next stage within the same interview. They reveal more about the position and the company than is strictly necessary for that stage of the interview. Like they want me to evaluate the information against my expectations and start making a decision myself.
  3. They share more details about the upcoming interview process. For example, “It may take 4-5 days because John may be back from Brussels only on Thursday, although he is trying to catch an earlier flight, but he also has the flu, so he can be in the office only on Thursday. Monday ... blah blah. "instead of" We are still interviewing candidates and we will call you. "With this, they ask me to seriously evaluate them because they are seriously considering me.
  4. The interview soon starts to feel a bit like I'm already being trained for the job, rather than getting to know me. I've had many interviews where I felt it was a great combination and I felt like they probably thought the same thing because beyond the basics of getting to know me, the interview mostly told me the inner workings of the job and it felt more like a first time. training session.
  5. They "trust" me. It feels a bit like they are already speaking to me as one of the team, discussing the challenges of the position as if they feel they can because I am someone who understands.
  6. There may be a gift. For example, I remember an interview in which the (European) boss told me that he had flown in from Europe especially to interview me and another candidate. I felt that he would not have shown me as much importance as a candidate if he had not chosen me already and I thought that there was probably no other candidate, I felt as if I had just said that there was one for the sake of salary negotiation.

There are many interesting perspectives here in response to your question. There is some truth to what many respondents here say: that a good interview will give you no clue as to their assessment of you. But as an interview progresses positively, a good interviewer will also start to sell you on the job and begin to show signs of "buying."

When I start evaluating candidates, I start to talk trivially and try to build trust in you and me. Establishing a fast relationship is important between us, as we will work together to make a very important decision for us.

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There are many interesting perspectives here in response to your question. There is some truth to what many respondents here say: that a good interview will give you no clue as to their assessment of you. But as an interview progresses positively, a good interviewer will also start to sell you on the job and begin to show signs of "buying."

When I start evaluating candidates, I start to talk trivially and try to build trust in you and me. Creating a fast relationship is important between us, as we will work together to make a very important decision for both of us. I will be warm, friendly, approachable, flexible and I encourage you to open up to me in an honest way.

Once a brief relationship is established (I promise, I'll get to your answer!), I'll start asking "neutral" questions - factual, non-controversial, and non-judgmental questions that don't require you to risk your answers too much. I may even ask you to ask me questions about the work we are discussing.

Then we will get into the nitty-gritty of the interview. I have developed my question line to build a question on top of the previous one and will ask you a variety of bogus options or even key questions. I will try to steer you away from the correct answer in a few subtle ways, hoping that you will answer honestly in ways that help me determine your actual fit (not just what you think I want you to say). I will appear neutral, or I can provide arguments that support two possible legitimate answers to my questions. It should be difficult to find what I am looking for here. I may question some of your answers, or even appear to argue a bit with you. I can also "push your buttons" a bit. How do you react? What do you say? How much do you say? What I really seek is an honest and frank introspection,

Through this point, you should have no idea if you are fit for my role or not, beyond what you have read and what I have said.

If my evaluation shows that you don't fit, I will let you know at this time, or that I want to speak with other candidates before making a determination that you are not yet the “best” candidate.

If my evaluation shows that it is possible to fit in, we will start talking about the future. And this is where your question is answered.

I'll start giving you "buy" signals. We will move from theoretical questions to more concrete practical questions. I'll start offering more information about the company, the team, the projects and the work environment as a volunteer. I encourage you to ask me questions, so that I can reassure you, give you the information you need to get excited and get this job done.

We may talk about compensation and your motivations for accepting a new job.

I will become warmer, more accommodating, even friendlier.

I can start to share more personal details about myself and the job here as I begin to anticipate that it will become a co-worker. My answers to your questions can be closer, more frank, more complete. I can introduce you to people on the team or other leaders.

In general, the longer an interview, the better (an exception to this is if you or the interviewer are too wordy). Longer interviews most of the time indicate more common ground between interviewers, a better relationship, and more grounds for "fitting in." (However, some interviewers will stop an interview early on, saying they know it when they see it, so sometimes even a very short interview is a good sign.)

A litmus test that you can implement is to ask the interviewer "What do you think the next steps will be with my candidacy?" An uncompromising answer, or a "fuzzy" answer, probably bodes ill for you. If your answer is more positive, or more specific and immediate ("We will probably want you to come back soon to meet with XYX"), then things could be fine.

Still, even if it all went wonderfully, when the people who make up the interview team come together and come together to report their views on you and the fit you have with the role, things can quickly go wrong! and all bets are off!

Here is the answer I wrote for a word that will not be used: Arun SM's response to What was the longest interview you've had that led to rejection?

Another answer, to explain what to avoid when preparing for interviews: Arun SM's answer to Why am I doing poorly in interviews even though I am technically strong?

What are those other things that you should never use?

  • Stop saying lies. Yes, the interviewer can catch you right away if you are lying to them.
  • Stop using I's unless you are about to count the things you did on your own entirely. "I did it", "It is only possible because of me", "I am" in your answers
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Here is the answer I wrote for a word that will not be used: Arun SM's response to What was the longest interview you've had that led to rejection?

Another answer, to explain what to avoid when preparing for interviews: Arun SM's answer to Why am I doing poorly in interviews even though I am technically strong?

What are those other things that you should never use?

  • Stop saying lies. Yes, the interviewer can catch you right away if you are lying to them.
  • Stop using I's unless you are about to count the things you did on your own entirely. "I did it", "It is only possible thanks to me", "I am" in your answers this shows selfishness. Using words like "We did it", "We could", "Good team support" shows that you are involved and listening to others.
  • Stop bragging about yourself. Never say those things written on your resume when asked about you. Explain things like experience at your previous company, explain what it was like to work with the previous team, explain your learnings from last year, repeating things on the resume does not help you understand it better.
  • Never check your previous job or boss. It's an interview for your next job, not the interrogation or confession room. You can say quite safely that the current organization does not provide you with a platform to work in the XYZ area that you are interviewing for.

Here are some typical questions that are asked in almost every interview (the way these questions are asked can be modified, but the answer will remain similar):

Q: How long are you waiting for this position?

Bad answer: I expect XXXX and additional benefits, if any.

Good answer: I don't know how much you earn for a similar role in the organization. What is the offer that a person with ABC, XYZ skills receives?

Alternative answer: From my research, I am sure that the organization justifies my position. I expect an increase of XYZ% in my current salary, please propose a figure to reach (say current numbers when asked | not necessary to be true).

Q: Do you work in a team or collaborate individually?

Bad answer: I want to test every instance of my career and show what my ability is, so I don't like to share my work with others.

Good answer: I have demonstrated the ability to work independently, it is necessary to work in a team although I work independently. Working as a team in a collaborative effort can reduce the time required to complete a product.

Q: Did you come here for an interview because this organization is ranked above your current organization and we provide better facilities?

Bad answer: Yes, I want to contribute to make this organization more successful. I can't go to the third ranked organization below my current organization, it will not suit me. The only option for me was to approach your organization because I think I deserve better for this position.

Good answer: Changing organizations has nothing to do with their ranking, plus each organization has its own challenges to face, so I think comparing two organizations is not a good idea. The reason for seeking a new position is the exposure I need and the skill sets I have for the XYZ domain for which my current organization does not have the opportunity.

PS: Be as honest as possible when answering, giving wrong information and getting a job won't last long in the new position. It will give you a bad impression and you will have to see those faces that have lost confidence in you.

All the best for your interviews :)

If you are an expert (I mean a real expert) at reading body language, you can read how the interviewer reacts to your answers during the interview, but keep in mind that, in most employers, you will have to make an impression. positive in most cases. if not all, of the entire list of interviews. The decision to hire or not to hire is not usually a single person. Key signs of positive interview body language include smiling (even a small smile), eye contact (although many interviewers keep their heads down during the interview ...

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You are overreacting. Even if I know I'm going to hire that person, I never tell them on the spot. I always end with “Thanks for your time. We are still talking to other people and will let you know in x time. "I do this for several reasons:

  1. I have to verify that my desire to hire meets the managers desire to hire. Sometimes that means that I have to fight for a candidate, sometimes that means that it is a "Yes" of two seconds between all the parties.
  2. Some managers are the type of person who never makes a quick decision. I have met many managers who feel they cannot trust a decision.
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You are overreacting. Even if I know I'm going to hire that person, I never tell them on the spot. I always end with “Thanks for your time. We are still talking to other people and will let you know in x time. "I do this for several reasons:

  1. I have to verify that my desire to hire meets the managers desire to hire. Sometimes that means that I have to fight for a candidate, sometimes that means that it is a "Yes" of two seconds between all the parties.
  2. Some managers are the type of person who never makes a quick decision. I have met many managers who feel they cannot trust a decision unless they sleep on it. You have to give them that time.
  3. If I have other interviews scheduled, I will not ignore them simply because I like you. Many times I have been left at the end of an interview process with two equally great candidates and have to make a difficult decision between them.
  4. I may love you, but I don't think you're the right fit for this exact position. In that case, I have to sell you to the manager of the position I think you are suitable for. This takes time and perhaps a second interview. Remember that HR hires for the entire company and not just for one position. Many times I have selected an excellent candidate from interviews in one department to fill a position that I had open in another department.
  5. I have no final contracting power. Sometimes it has to be settled through a budget or a director before you can officially bid. Sometimes I just need time to get things in order based on my company's procedures.

Don't be put off by hearing that they have other people they are talking to. Your job is to talk to many people and choose the best one. I know looking for work is difficult and emotionally draining. The best advice I can give you is to know yourself (strengths, weaknesses, likes and dislikes), be honest and straightforward in your responses, but stay positive (no one wants a shady Gus on their team), and know your worth. If you can master those three skills, it may take a little time, but you will get the job that meets your needs, makes you happy, and allows you to be successful.

The only sign that you will receive an offer is when you have a written offer. But there are clues that suggest it has a 50/50 chance after interviews.

One sign: if the company uses Taleo for its ATS, you verify your request and it still shows "Withdraw" as an option. That means you are still on the run.

A common sign: You didn't have a "disconnect" between you and the hiring team during the interviews. Now, I had two interviews that I thought I did very well, but one was turned down and the other was an offer!

One difference that I noticed between both job opportunities:

Wait 1-2 weeks with no response. Send an email to

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The only sign that you will receive an offer is when you have a written offer. But there are clues that suggest it has a 50/50 chance after interviews.

One sign: if the company uses Taleo for its ATS, you verify your request and it still shows "Withdraw" as an option. That means you are still on the run.

A common sign: You didn't have a "disconnect" between you and the hiring team during the interviews. Now, I had two interviews that I thought I did very well, but one was turned down and the other was an offer!

One difference that I noticed between both job opportunities:

Wait 1-2 weeks with no response. Email the recruiter with something like this:

"Hello there __________,

Hope all is well. I wanted to register and see if there is an update or status for the Position Name position that I interviewed for on Day of the week, month and day. I'm still very interested and hope to hear from you. "

A very good sign is that the recruiter responds to you the same day with a status update. I had to wait 6 weeks from the time of the interview until I received my offer !! The key sign was that every time I checked with the recruiter every 1-2 weeks, they ALWAYS responded the same day. "We're still interviewing", "So-and-so is out of town", "I approached the team and they should have a decision before the X date." That kind of things.

I sent the same tailored email to the other company. The company where I did not receive the offer did not respond the same day. Nothing but crickets. They took days to respond and when I got a response it was "We have completed our evaluation process and we regret to inform you that we have decided to move forward with another candidate who more closely aligns with our needs."

Keep applying and interviewing until you get the offer you want my friend!

I'm not sure there are any (unless the interviewer explicitly says so).

Sure, people * think * they can tell. They will certainly try to guess your performance. But in my experience when talking to candidates and then comparing their perception of their performance with how they actually performed, there is little correlation.

Full Disclaimer: Most of my experience as an interviewer is for technical roles, where there are real troubleshooting questions.

When people think they have done well, it is usually based on one of two reasons:

  1. Interviewer Mood: The interviewer appeared to be "happy." This is
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I'm not sure there are any (unless the interviewer explicitly says so).

Sure, people * think * they can tell. They will certainly try to guess your performance. But in my experience when talking to candidates and then comparing their perception of their performance with how they actually performed, there is little correlation.

Full Disclaimer: Most of my experience as an interviewer is for technical roles, where there are real troubleshooting questions.

When people think they have done well, it is usually based on one of two reasons:

  1. Interviewer Mood: The interviewer appeared to be "happy." This is problematic because it is not clear that the interviewer is nicer to candidates who are doing well. It certainly wasn't. If anything, I was nicer to the candidates who were performing worse, because I felt bad for them.
  2. Difficulty / ease in solving problems (for technical / consulting roles / etc.). The problem with this is that it is not really about how many problems you have to solve a problem; it's about how many problems you have * relative * to other candidates. And, of course, you don't know how other candidates fared.


The only thing that could be an indicator is if:

  1. Good performance The interviewer is making a clear hard sell. And even then ... It is beneficial for you to think well of the company, even if you are rejected.
  2. Poor performance You have serious problems with a question, such as a complete and total freeze. That could put you squarely on the bottom of candidates even on a tough problem.


Basically, attempts to guess its performance will be slightly more accurate than random guesses. It is better to be optimistic and wait to find out what happened.

Typically, there is no particular form or words that interviewers use to let you know that you will not receive the offer.

Sometimes everything goes very well in the interview but still the result will be 'rejected'. This usually happens when they have already selected the required number of candidates. Sometimes an average interview can give a "selected" result. Therefore, it is not possible to say for sure what the result will be. That said, there are certain times when we can predict that we won't get the offer. That's when they don't ask you questions like 'Are you willing to work anywhere, in any city?' or if not a

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Typically, there is no particular form or words that interviewers use to let you know that you will not receive the offer.

Sometimes everything goes very well in the interview but still the result will be 'rejected'. This usually happens when they have already selected the required number of candidates. Sometimes an average interview can give a "selected" result. Therefore, it is not possible to say for sure what the result will be. That said, there are certain times when we can predict that we won't get the offer. That's when they don't ask you questions like 'Are you willing to work anywhere, in any city?' or if they don't ask you HR questions, or they ask you to leave after 2 or 3 simple questions at the start. In situations like these, we fix firmly in our minds that the outcome will be negative. However, we cannot be totally sure of the outcome until it arrives.

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Hope this has helped. All the best!

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I write about campus placements, so you can visit my profile for many of those responses. You can also follow Btech Campus Placements for more related content. Thanks!

With the coronavirus disrupting every aspect of our lives, interviews are no exception. Face-to-face interaction is limited at the moment, replaced by Skype, Hangout, Zoom or other virtual communication platforms. These digital interviews make it more difficult to determine if a job offer might be within your reach.

To know if an interview went well or not, look at the following points:

- your interviewer starts talking about the company culture, advantages or positive memories of having worked there, he is probably interested in you.

-Personal questions often mean that an interviewer trusts you.

Keep reading

With the coronavirus disrupting every aspect of our lives, interviews are no exception. Face-to-face interaction is limited at the moment, replaced by Skype, Hangout, Zoom or other virtual communication platforms. These digital interviews make it more difficult to determine if a job offer might be within your reach.

To know if an interview went well or not, look at the following points:

- your interviewer starts talking about the company culture, advantages or positive memories of having worked there, he is probably interested in you.

-Personal questions often mean that an interviewer is confident in your ability to get the job done.

-Paying close attention to an interviewer's facial expressions and body language says a lot.

-When a hiring manager knows that he has met the right person for the job, his language usually proves it.

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