What are the most popular programming languages in Germany at the moment?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Alexander Lee



What are the most popular programming languages in Germany at the moment?

According to the PYPL (Programming Language Popularity Index), in Germany, Python is the most popular language, Python was the one that grew the most in the last 5 years (16.7%) and Java was the one that lost the most (0, 9%).

The bottom of the popularity scale in Germany are VBA and Objective-C. Most of those who work with these languages ​​are reluctant to do so and would like more flexibility in language selection. In 2021, the way in which, and in particular, what is programmed in companies, will play a determining role in the choice of employer. Therefore, companies that have difficulty hiring IT professionals should ensure that they offer potential applicants a choice and that they are open to new languages ​​and technologies.

Programming languages ​​are not paid. Programmers are paid.

You are picky. You know what I meant. "

I think I know what you meant, and if my guess is correct, your question makes no sense. I suppose the question assumes that programming languages ​​can be ranked in order of how well the programmers who use them are paid, and that ranking reflects what the highest paid programmers use, how much users of a language are paid. given on average, and also how much someone can expect to earn depending on the programming language they learn.

This assumption is completely wrong.

First, if you look up

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Programming languages ​​are not paid. Programmers are paid.

You are picky. You know what I meant. "

I think I know what you meant, and if my guess is correct, your question makes no sense. I suppose the question assumes that programming languages ​​can be ranked in order of how well the programmers who use them are paid, and that ranking reflects what the highest paid programmers use, how much users of a language are paid. given on average, and also how much someone can expect to earn depending on the programming language they learn.

This assumption is completely wrong.

First of all, if you look at highly paid people, who write code as part of their job, you will find that your salary has nothing to do with being able to code in any particular language. Sometimes they are very well paid because they also manage people. Sometimes they are product managers.

Sometimes they are researchers in areas like big data or artificial intelligence. They can use generic-purpose programming languages ​​like Python because they have libraries for what they need, and sometimes they use specialized programming languages ​​for their fields, like R. programming language.

Even for more typical software development jobs, there are skills and knowledge that affect pay more than programming languages ​​someone knows: domain knowledge, knowledge of specific products, understanding of various software engineering concerns such as design principles, domain modeling, requirements work, automation testing, etc.

For mainstream software development, companies will, of course, tend to hire people who know the languages ​​in which their software is written. However, how much they pay depends on several factors (in no particular order).

  • Industry: Some industries (like finance) pay better and others (like video games) pay worse on average. Various technologies, including programming languages, can be used more or less frequently in certain industries, which can skew the statistics, but that doesn't mean that developers working in a language that is widely used in finance will get more money if they work. in others. industries, or that financial software developers in less typical technologies will be paid less (in fact, they may be paid more).
  • Geography - Some locations are more expensive to live in, so the people who live there in general, and especially qualified professionals of any kind, are paid higher. Partly because they need to be paid more, otherwise they would move elsewhere, but there are also positive comments: having a lot of well-paid people living in one area adds to the cost of living. The latter is often linked to the location being a center for a particular type of industry, so see above; For example, developers who live in or near financial centers will tend to work in finance more often than developers who live elsewhere and will therefore be paid more. on average, and developers living in financial centers,
  • Scarcity - This is where the programming language really matters, but there is no simple relationship either. If it is difficult to find programmers in a certain language, employers will pay more, but that usually means that the jobs are also less and some developers simply cannot find a job programming in that language, or they may have to move (possibly to a more expensive, possibly to a more expensive location), or their ability to find a job could depend on the quality of their network of contacts, so if they work for the only employer in your area that uses the language they code in, it is They may not be paid well at all and have no real influence on their employer, and there is no practical way to quit and go to work somewhere that pays better.
  • … Many other factors, most of which have little to do with the programming language they use.

I've spent over 35 years programming in C, but I wouldn't say it's the most powerful, far from it. Power in a language, to me, means something that provides the best combination of performance and maintainability divided by the amount of developer time required to implement a project. Power, in that case, depends a lot on what you are trying to achieve. Some of that power may not be in the language itself, but in the ecosystem around it (Python and JavaScript are good examples of that, even Java and the other JVM-based languages ​​benefit from the entire ecosystem based in JVM).

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I've spent over 35 years programming in C, but I wouldn't say it's the most powerful, far from it. Power in a language, to me, means something that provides the best combination of performance and maintainability divided by the amount of developer time required to implement a project. Power, in that case, depends a lot on what you are trying to achieve. Some of that power may not be in the language itself, but in the ecosystem around it (Python and JavaScript are good examples of that, even Java and the other JVM-based languages ​​benefit from the entire ecosystem based in JVM).

If you wanted to do rapid development of applications where you needed very fast access to data, but you weren't doing scientific / numerical programming, you would use Caché ObjectScript (note that it came from a language even older than C, ANSI Standard M / Mumps )

If I want to do a lot of low-level bit-shifting, kernel drivers, where memory allocation is important, I would use C (which * is * a testament to the greatness of the language for certain tasks, which is still the best for now (but alternatives already exist that are growing for these tasks of programming of systems) after almost 50 years.

However, for most of my current programming I would use Julia, which is much more expressive than C, it allows me to write code that can be easily extended to deal with new types and having to write new code (generic programming), it goes further Beyond single shipping "object oriented" it allows me to easily use functional programming styles (without stressing it) and allows me to access libraries in C, Python, R, Fortran (and essentially anything with a C interface directly ).

Note: Julia still has a long way to go, especially. with string handling, debugging, stable language features (not in a v1.0 version yet), however we have found it to be the most powerful language for * our * uses at the moment, i.e. it allows us to write good maintainable code that works much faster and with few programmers (something quite important for a startup).

I think you have the wrong idea about what a programming language is. It is not that a programming language lacks functionality, it is designed to solve a problem using a specific mindset.

It does not ask the question: “Why do we all speak French, English and Swahili? Why can't we come up with a language that has words for everything? "In which case, we'd probably all speak German, which seems to have a word for everything. That slightly brighter light in the center when you take a photo with the sun directly behind you, yeah, they have a word for that ..." heiligenschein ". 1

Now you can

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Footnotes

1 Heiligenschein - Wikipedia

I think you have the wrong idea about what a programming language is. It is not that a programming language lacks functionality, it is designed to solve a problem using a specific mindset.

It does not ask the question: “Why do we all speak French, English and Swahili? Why can't we come up with a language that has words for everything? "In which case, we'd probably all speak German, which seems to have a word for everything. That slightly brighter light in the center when you take a photo with the sun directly behind you, yeah, they have a word for that ..." heiligenschein ". 1

Now, as you can see, I described exactly what the effect was in English, but it took me about 17 words to do it. In German, one word. That means that, from that point of view, German is the most efficient language to speak.

The same goes for computer languages. It can do almost anything in any computer language. The difference is that certain languages ​​are much better at doing one type of work than another.

In the end, almost all computer languages ​​out there are Full Turing 2, so you can do anything with it indeed. That said, there are many things that are easier in one computer language than another; otherwise we'd all be scrambling by flipping switches to set an address and then a data value, and then locking it in memory. 3

But we don't do that. We have languages ​​designed to solve problems.

For example, the LISP language is really good at processing lists of data and was one of the pioneers in the field of artificial intelligence programming. However, more recently he has been overthrown in that field, because we no longer believe that AI is just the comparative processing of large lists of data.

C was created to provide a bridge between low-level languages ​​like Assembler and higher-level languages ​​like BASIC. BASIC makes coding easier, but slow to process. C is less intuitive to code, but is very fast when running, often only a few percent slower than assembly language coding.

C ++ was created to put the object-oriented paradigm on top of C, which was something new and exciting in the 1980s that made it easier for humans to understand larger, more complex problems and model them on a computer.

Java was created ... well, Oak was created and renamed Java, to provide a C ++-like experience on embedded processors, while hiding a lot of the low-level stuff that was the most common cause of problems in the C realm and C ++, like memory. administration.

Newer languages ​​continue to be written because they address a particular area or set of features with easy access.

But I can tell you right now, in almost every language, you can write code to run the exact same program. It may not be as efficient as the English version of "heiligenschein".

A university professor of mine once showed me a 10-line program in APL, which solved the Rubik's Cube.

10 lines. There is your "heiligenschein" of programming languages.

That said, the code was so cryptic and difficult to read, that even he admitted that he would rather rewrite it than try to make changes to it.

This is why there are so many languages ​​out there. Not because of the features or the functionality, but because sometimes you need to describe something in a quick and easy way, and that particular language was created just for that.

COBOL still exists, because it's still really good at processing the kinds of things that most accounting departments do. There is still code running in the business world that was developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Glad to know the kind of emotional pain it causes when others have to deal with keeping it ... no wait, that's "schadenfreude." Damn those Germans ... Sigh.

Footnotes

1 Heiligenschein - Wikipedia 2 Turing completeness - Wikipedia 3 Altair 8800 - Wikipedia

In this article we are going to discuss the top 5 programming languages ​​to learn in 2019 to get a job at Google, Facebook, Microsoft, etc. So a question arises: does it matter what language I should learn?

Yes, it does matter, but indirectly. When you apply for software engineer jobs in big companies like Google, Facebook, Microsoft, etc. regardless of the technology you use. They will only check three conditions:

Coding skills

problem solving skills

Data structures and knowledge of algorithms.

So we are going to list the top 5 programming languages ​​to learn in 2019. I had created this list in the base

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In this article we are going to discuss the top 5 programming languages ​​to learn in 2019 to get a job at Google, Facebook, Microsoft, etc. So a question arises: does it matter what language I should learn?

Yes, it does matter, but indirectly. When you apply for software engineer jobs in big companies like Google, Facebook, Microsoft, etc. regardless of the technology you use. They will only check three conditions:

Coding skills

problem solving skills

Data structures and knowledge of algorithms.

So Let List Down the Top 5 Programming Languages ​​to Learn in 2019. I had created this list based on three factors:

Work market

ease of learning

popularity.

So here is the list. In number 5 we have

5. Go Lang

This language was released in 2012 by Google engineers. Now it is rapidly gaining popularity. It is included in the list of the 5 most paid programming languages. If your app struggles with performance and readability, Go is a way to go (no pun intended). For beginners, this can be a bit difficult to learn because Go relies heavily on tips that may not be easy to understand as a new programmer.

it's a good time to learn to go,

4. Fast

swift has now become the main language for creating ios.it applications - & nbspapps Resources and information. - Resources and information from & nbspapps. It is also one of the highest paid programming languages ​​that many companies demand fast developers today. Swift is simple and easy to learn, but it is not cross platform, which means that you cannot build ios applications if you don't have a Mac device.

3. Java

Java is one of the most widely used programming languages. Today it is the main language to make http: // Languages ​​Android. It is a complex language and not easy to learn. Many companies are using Java to develop their programs.

Fun fact: the creator of Java works at Amazon as an engineer.

But a new Kotlin language developed by jet brains is gaining more popularity, which is why many platforms are moving from Java to Kotlin.

Companies that use Java: Slack, Uber, Lyft, Airbnb, etc.

2. Python

It is one of the most popular programming languages. Most companies use Python to develop their software. NASA also uses Python to develop its software. Python can be used in web development, different frameworks like Django and flask are also used to create websites. And if you're interested in data science, machine learning, artificial languages, and deep learning, go blindly for Python. Python is the easiest language to learn, its syntax is very simple.

Fun fact: the creator of Python now works at Dropbox as an engineer.

Companies that use Python: Google, Dropbox, Coursera, Airbnb, etc.

1. Javascript

javascript is a great language to learn. It only runs in the Chrome, Firefox, Safari or Explorer web browser. It is developing as fast as the javascript I had seen a few years ago and has completely changed compared to Home - Home - Now. It is used to develop desktop applications and web applications. There are different frameworks like react, native, angular used in javascript.

Companies that use javascript: Reddit, ebay, instagram, Airbnb, etc.

A tip from me:

If you are new to the world of programming, I would recommend that you choose javascript or python, but it really depends on your preferences, as if you are interested in UI design, then javascript is the best option. data science, then opt for Python.

If you liked this post, I would be very grateful if you would help spread it by emailing a friend or sharing it on Twitter or Facebook and don't forget to leave a comment because your comments are greatly appreciated and help us improve. Thanks!

There are things that I consider basic:

  • HTML: Hypertext Markup Language. It is the skeleton of your website. See the top header for Quora? That is an html tag. The button for 'Add question? Another different html tag. And so on
  • CSS - Cascading style sheet. If HTML is the skeleton, CSS is the meat. This is how we declare the style of a website. Colors, spacing, border, even basic animations.

If you like the FrontEnd part (the user side of the website):

  • Javascript: this is the only language used in the interface, so it is practically mandatory. Makes a website dynamic. Clicking on "Add Queue
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There are things that I consider basic:

  • HTML: Hypertext Markup Language. It is the skeleton of your website. See the top header for Quora? That is an html tag. The button for 'Add question? Another different html tag. And so on
  • CSS - Cascading style sheet. If HTML is the skeleton, CSS is the meat. This is how we declare the style of a website. Colors, spacing, border, even basic animations.

If you like the FrontEnd part (the user side of the website):

  • Javascript: this is the only language used in the interface, so it is practically mandatory. Makes a website dynamic. When you click "Add question", Javascript sends your question to the Quora BackEnd (server side) and stores the question. When I saw this question, I clicked on it and Javascript asked the server to look up your question and other people's answers. It also works for animations, getting / sending data, moving things around the website, and more.

If you like the BackEnd part (the server side of the website):

  • Any backend language: yes, any. Everyone has their personal preferences, but any language works, it doesn't matter if it's Python, Java, C #, Golang, Javascript ... All languages ​​can do the same in 99% of the cases.
    I personally prefer Python as it is easy to learn, it has great frameworks like Flask and Django, but I also used PHP, Javascript, and Java.
    Try some of them and choose the one that suits you best. Don't be dogmatic.

That is what you should need. Then after that come frameworks, database query languages, and more.

But the basics are HTML, CSS, Javascript, or (and!) A backend language.

As others have said, it is quite difficult to categorize exactly when you know a language. But here in chronological order:

  • C # - Language I used for most of my CS degree
  • JavaScript / HTML / CSS - Used during a web design course in my undergraduate degree
  • Haskell - used in various courses and in free time projects after my education.
  • Prologue: also single.
  • Java (Android) - Create a native app for a part-time job you had.
  • Objective-C: ditto.
  • Rascal - a language created by the university I attended during my SE master's degree.
  • Python: used during my teacher
  • CoffeeScript - used to create a prototype for my thesis on software visualization.
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As others have said, it is quite difficult to categorize exactly when you know a language. But here in chronological order:

  • C # - Language I used for most of my CS degree
  • JavaScript / HTML / CSS - Used during a web design course in my undergraduate degree
  • Haskell - used in various courses and in free time projects after my education.
  • Prologue: also single.
  • Java (Android) - Create a native app for a part-time job you had.
  • Objective-C: ditto.
  • Rascal - a language created by the university I attended during my SE master's degree.
  • Python: used during my teacher
  • CoffeeScript - used to create a prototype for my thesis on software visualization.
  • Ruby: used in my current job.
  • Groovy - I used it just a little bit to compile scripts for my current work.
  • Elixir - Currently using it in a spare time project.
  • Kotlin: ditto.

The interesting thing is that after every new language I learn, I appreciate something about it and it changes my view of programming in general (although JavaScript seems to be the only exception in that ... I really don't like that language ...).

My favorite language of all time is Haskell. The type system in combination with pure functional programming, algebraic data types, and pattern matching is really a nice experience. It's still a bit of a nice language though and I don't expect it to ever become commonplace. On top of that, I recently started using Kotlin and I quite like it too. I have some hope that one day it will become an important language, as it is everything Java is to me, but better.

"Why not other more popular languages?" Well, let's take a look at the most popular languages!

According to the TIOBE index, Javascript is the seventh most popular programming language. I'll list the six that are more popular than Javascript, along with my thoughts on whether / why I'd learn them:

  1. Java - Used everywhere from backend services to Android mobile apps. It is definitely worth learning!
  2. C - Useful if you are writing low-level device drivers, Linux patches, and the like. Or if you are maintaining legacy systems written in C. Skip the opposite.
  3. C ++: same as C above.
  4. C #: essential if '
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"Why not other more popular languages?" Well, let's take a look at the most popular languages!

According to the TIOBE index, Javascript is the seventh most popular programming language. I'll list the six that are more popular than Javascript, along with my thoughts on whether / why I'd learn them:

  1. Java - Used everywhere from backend services to Android mobile apps. It is definitely worth learning!
  2. C - Useful if you are writing low-level device drivers, Linux patches, and the like. Or if you are maintaining legacy systems written in C. Skip the opposite.
  3. C ++: same as C above.
  4. C #: a must if you are in the Microsoft .NET ecosystem. Skip it otherwise.
  5. Python - Very useful general purpose language for everything from machine learning to web backends and utility scripts for your personal use. It is definitely worth learning!
  6. PHP - My impression is that Python can do everything PHP does, and more… and in a more elegant way. My advice is that you learn Python.

Beyond the somewhat obvious answers (Java, C #, Python, and TypeScript, of which Java is probably the best), I would add a couple of new languages ​​for early adopters (not so):

  • Web / Cloud Backend: Golang
  • Web interface: Dart with AngularDart or Hummingbird later
  • Mobile Applications: Dart for prototyping and cross-platform business applications; Kotlin and Swift for native application development
  • Desktop Applications: Kotlin
  • Data Science, Numerical Computing: Julia
  • Some full-stack languages ​​(there are many more too):
    • Dart with AngularDart, Flutter on the front-end and Angel or Aqueduct on DartVM on the backend
    • Swift app on iO
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Beyond the somewhat obvious answers (Java, C #, Python, and TypeScript, of which Java is probably the best), I would add a couple of new languages ​​for early adopters (not so):

  • Web / Cloud Backend: Golang
  • Web interface: Dart with AngularDart or Hummingbird later
  • Mobile Applications: Dart for prototyping and cross-platform business applications; Kotlin and Swift for native application development
  • Desktop Applications: Kotlin
  • Data Science, Numerical Computing: Julia
  • Some full-stack languages ​​(there are many more too):
    • Dart with AngularDart, Flutter on the front-end and Angel or Aqueduct on DartVM on the backend
    • Swift app on iOS, Steam on the back end
    • Kotlin app on Android, Spring or Sparkjava or vert.x, etc. via the JVM on the backend
    • ClojureScript on the front-end, Clojure over JVM on the back-end

Piton

Python is always recommended if you are looking for an easy and even fun programming language to learn first. Rather than having to jump to strict syntax rules, Python reads like English and is easy for someone new to programming to understand. This allows you to gain a basic understanding of coding practices without obsessing over the smaller details that are often important in other languages.

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It depends. In general, it is not much different from US
Java in companies and schools and the same for other languages. Whereas in applied computer science students are generally taught C, Java as a minimum. Cognitive computing has haskell, Java, assembler, c and one more.
Enterprise information technology has Java, javascript.
But I think it would be easier to look for studies that describe the industrial use of programming languages. Since computing is not country dependent, you can expect similar results to other countries like USA, etc.

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