What are the most obvious green flags in a job interview?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Shane Tyler



What are the most obvious green flags in a job interview?

Green flags that the candidate for the position would be a great employee OR green flag as a candidate for the position that you have a good feeling that the position will be offered to you?

As an interviewer here are some green flags that will make me want to hire the candidate:

  • The candidate for the position is able to communicate his experience very well and is very knowledgeable about his mastery ability. They can even correct me or provide new ideas that I didn't know about.
  • The interview feels more like a great conversation with a fair amount of back and forth dialogue and the 45 minutes of interviewing the person seems like it flew by and was
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Green flags that the candidate for the position would be a great employee OR green flag as a candidate for the position that you have a good feeling that the position will be offered to you?

As an interviewer here are some green flags that will make me want to hire the candidate:

  • The candidate for the position is able to communicate his experience very well and is very knowledgeable about his mastery ability. They can even correct me or provide new ideas that I didn't know about.
  • The interview feels more like a big conversation with a fair amount of back and forth dialogue and the 45 minutes of interviewing the person seems like he flew by and he wished he could keep talking.
  • They are capable of solving your current problems or have experience that would provide them with invaluable experience / knowledge to solve those problems.
  • They are very nice. Sometimes there will be several candidates who are well qualified, but the interviewer wants to know if they would like to work with this person.
  • The candidate shows confidence but humility, is enthusiastic about the position and asks me very good well thought out questions.

As a candidate interviewing for the job, there are a few green flags that you can tell they want to hire you:

  • You're having a good back and forth dialogue and after answering a question really well, they reply with "ok, great" or "wow, that was a great answer." You can also tell by your body language, nodding in agreement, or your posture or guard is now somewhat open to you.
  • They start talking about some real world problems that they have come across in their jobs / industry and they ask how you would solve them and in fact you propose a good solution and have other follow-up proposals / solutions that can be developed in different scenarios. You know that you have done your best to answer your question (see the first point above).
  • You can build rapport with most interviewers at least 4 out of 6 of them, and usually if you impress the hiring manager and even the manager's boss, chances are you'll get an offer.
  • At any point during the interview, usually in the middle of lunch or even at the end of the interviews, they stop by the Director, VP, or even the C-Suite level for a short introduction.
  • At the end of the interview, the HR representative walks in and begins to evaluate what would be a suitable offer for you to hire. They can even ask for a possible start date, etc. Sometimes they just ask your current salary, but it is debatable whether to give that information or not. Talking about salary isn't always a sure sign that you'll get an offer, and sometimes it's just to get another data point for your purposes. But talking about salary in combination with the other factors is a very good sign that you will receive an offer.

These are just a few green flags in the eyes of the interviewer or interviewee. Candidates who are constantly displaying green flags are very rare. It may even indicate that the candidate is slightly overqualified for that position or level.

Here's one.

If the interviewer starts talking about their hobbies, they have probably landed the job. The interviewer has asked all the work questions he needs and is just looking at what kind of person you are or share one of your hobbies.

Therefore, do not mention a hobby that you do not have.

For example, if you say you like to watch trains, he may ask you if you have seen a 4–6–2 recently. Or you say Dungeons & Dragons, and he tells you that he made the Tomb of Horrors with a 7/8 thief / illusionist.

Be prepared to talk about your hobbies. And, ideally, have hobbies that are interesting (e.g., more than just going back to

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Here's one.

If the interviewer starts talking about their hobbies, they have probably landed the job. The interviewer has asked all the work questions he needs and is just looking at what kind of person you are or share one of your hobbies.

Therefore, do not mention a hobby that you do not have.

For example, if you say you like to watch trains, he may ask you if you have seen a 4–6–2 recently. Or you say Dungeons & Dragons, and he tells you that he made the Tomb of Horrors with a 7/8 thief / illusionist.

Be prepared to talk about your hobbies. And ideally have hobbies that are interesting (for example, something other than reading, watching TV, hanging out with my friends, and walking). Your interviewer may not share your fascination with manhole covers, but at least it's something you can ask about.

The best way to get green flags in an interview is to prepare by removing as much uncertainty as possible from the experience. Maybe even try to find out details about the room if you can.

Start by studying the job description and specification of the person (if there is one), as well as the job posting / interview invitation information and the website of the organization in question. Logically, these should give you all the "clues" you need to start guessing the types of skills and competencies required in the post. The interview questions should be about these. After this, start thinking broader about the organization.

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The best way to get green flags in an interview is to prepare by removing as much uncertainty as possible from the experience. Maybe even try to find out details about the room if you can.

Start by studying the job description and specification of the person (if there is one), as well as the job posting / interview invitation information and the website of the organization in question. Logically, these should give you all the "clues" you need to start guessing the types of skills and competencies required in the post. The interview questions should be about these. After this, start thinking more broadly about the organization, its values, the "market" / sector (s) in which it operates and in what context you are working. The more you know about them and their market circumstances, the easier it will be to "pitch" yourself as a good candidate.

That should be a good start to preparing, which in turn should help you feel like the questions are "easier," you are more confident, and you are more likely to impress your interviewer.

"Work hard, play hard."

This is a code for "You'll break your ass even on Hawaiian shirt day."

Expect to work perpetually understaffed with strong peer pressure to attend company picnics on the weekends.

Work hard, play hard = no time for you.


OTHER RED FLAGS TO LOOK FOR

Dust on diamonds. Tricks like bikes, Xbox, ping pong tables, weird collaboration areas ... and they're all covered in dust.

The Gestapo. They preach it. They teach it. They put worship in culture. Beware of the hive mind where people may look different but everyone thinks the same. Expect to be force-fed Kool-Aid, whatever

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"Work hard, play hard."

This is a code for "You'll break your ass even on Hawaiian shirt day."

Expect to work perpetually understaffed with strong peer pressure to attend company picnics on the weekends.

Work hard, play hard = no time for you.


OTHER RED FLAGS TO LOOK FOR

Dust on diamonds. Tricks like bikes, Xbox, ping pong tables, weird collaboration areas ... and they're all covered in dust.

The Gestapo. They preach it. They teach it. They put worship in culture. Beware of the hive mind where people may look different but everyone thinks the same. Expect to be force-fed the Kool-Aid, do what they tell you, don't ask questions, and don't let feelings get in the way of pretending you love your job.

Dinners called. Strange hours. Receive responses by email on Tuesday nights or sunny Sunday afternoons. If they are communicating with you when the rest of the world is living their life, chances are you are about to give up on yours. Yes, the world is connected. Yes, sometimes after hours emails make sense. But be the judge ... and pay attention.

Robots. Heavy use of office jargon and sanitized language means the company has been hijacked by climbers and corporate drones. Look for fancy and cryptic words to describe easy things. I once heard someone describe hiring a new employee: "We are looking to add a new asset this quarter." Seriously? Who talks like that? Nobody interesting, that's who.

The Overlord. Young, modern workers led by an older man who was breathing heavily. Expect it to last only as long as your youth lasts ... which means 27 years or less. At first, you might think that you are part of a secret. But as you get older and more expensive, you have the feeling that any day could be your last ... and it's true. They will be taking notes on every mistake, no matter how insignificant it is. And the day before your grandmother's funeral, you will get the notice.

The Quitter. The person you are replacing "just quit." People don't just give up money unless things are really bad. Quitting means not qualifying for unemployment compensation. And they were willing to risk spending their savings. Unless your interviewer has a solid reason and you need to ask, think twice before taking the leap.

NASA interviews. "Tell me about a time when ..." If your interview is more like a checklist for a shuttle launch, it is probably a micromanaged environment. Be on the lookout for over-prepared, time-critical interviews with a tight structure and ready-made question lists. Well done job interviews should take a natural conversation course.

I'm new! It's new! They are all new! Unless they are growing, and you can tell from recent office changes and new furniture and equipment, they probably have a high turnover. You will be new until you are unemployed.


PS Like most red flags, these are not hard and fast rules. These are simply things to keep in mind.

Like many tips, follow your instincts, it is usually correct.

I have interviewed many people over the years, mainly for sales and finance positions. When I interview a candidate, I want to hire him. And then I don't want them to give up. It is expensive to hire and train someone and then have them quit. So "red flags" are often signs that the candidate will not stay. Being prepared is key, and the best candidates tailor their responses to the position and provide intelligent answers to frequently asked interview questions.

These are some red flags that caught my attention.

Candidates who entered:

1. Showing off the offers they already had
, I interviewed a candidate who

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I have interviewed many people over the years, mainly for sales and finance positions. When I interview a candidate, I want to hire him. And then I don't want them to give up. It is expensive to hire and train someone and then have them quit. So "red flags" are often signs that the candidate will not stay. Being prepared is key, and the best candidates tailor their responses to the position and provide intelligent answers to frequently asked interview questions.

These are some red flags that caught my attention.

Candidates who entered:

1. Showing off the offers they already had I
interviewed a candidate who came to tell me that he already had a special offer from a heavily funded start-up. He said it immediately. I hadn't even decided I wanted to hire him, and he was already inciting me into a bidding war.

When candidates blatantly brag about other offerings, it indicates that they are not committed to this particular job. It is a red flag indicating that they will probably accept another offer, using my offer as leverage. And if they do join, as a hiring manager, I worry that they are always thinking "what if". I've seen these candidates resign when the going gets tough, to take another "greener grass" position.

It is not bad to get another offer in the interview, at the right time. Interviews are like a tennis match and timing is everything. The interviewer begins by throwing the ball and the candidate hits back. If you are a candidate with another offer, please set up your current interview first. Then, at the appropriate time, close with: "I am very interested in this opportunity. Please let me know when for the next step, as I also have another offer that I am evaluating."

2. Careless look
Candidates who come to the interview with wrinkled or dirty clothes, show the interviewer that they are not spending time. First impressions are important. How formal you dress will depend on the company, but as a candidate, your best bet is to choose an outfit that does not attract attention. The focus should be on the interview, not the clothing.

I once interviewed a candidate who came in wearing an overly casual and wrinkled outfit. It looked like I was going to a yoga class. Her painted nails were chipped and her hair was messy. However, we ignore the red flag. She was a good candidate and we hired her. He performed well, but resigned shortly after joining. When she quit, she admitted that she had already been accepted into business school and took the job for training and some cash to help her.

As a candidate, I recommend ironing and choosing an outfit the day before your interview. And try on the entire outfit, including shoes, accessories, and briefcase / bag. The last thing you want to think about is that you're ready, and an hour before the interview, you'll find that your pants don't fit or your jacket has a hole in it. Also, if you tend to be a person who sweats a lot, wear a darker colored shirt or jacket.

3. Don't ask questions
A good interview is a conversation in which both parties are engaged. The purpose is to find out if the position matches. If the candidate does not ask questions, it is a red flag. It seems that they are not interested or think they already know everything about the position.

As a candidate, if you really don't have questions, let's say you've already had an extensive round of interviews and are in the final interview, I recommend asking the interviewer something about their experience. Ask them how they got to the market, the industry, or what surprised them the most about the job.

If you are a candidate who tends to get nervous or forget things, it is acceptable to have your questions written down and bring them with you. I interviewed candidates who brought a list of questions with them and took notes.

Warning: While it is good to ask questions, be careful not to ask questions that show you don't fit the culture. For example, I have worked in places where the CEO demanded very strict hours, without exception. In that case, I would be concerned when candidates ask questions about working from home or setting their own hours, when that is not the practice at the company. For the record, I believe in flex time and I think employees should be able to work from home, but I have not been the CEO who sets the rules ...

4. Too aggressive A
candidate once said to me, "Okay, if you're that good, show me how to do it. Sell me this pen." I had not yet decided if I wanted to hire this candidate and found it jarring. After giving my answer (Mira Zaslove's answer to What are some of the best answers to "sell me this pen / pencil" in a job interview?), They proceeded to try to "outdo" me with a -press, presentation of foot. It was too much. It was a red flag for me as a hiring manager. It's hard to train people who ask questions, not to get an answer, but just to show how smart they are.

As a candidate, it is important to show confidence and intelligence. However, competing or arguing with the interviewer is rarely successful. Rather, it is a red flag indicating that the candidate is "untrainable."

Similarly, we once had to rescind an offer we made to a candidate for being too aggressive when he received the offer. When the hiring manager gave them the offer, the candidate proceeded to tell them what "# $ * # * # amazing they were going to be and # $ * # * # kill the market." The candidate screamed loudly, cursed, and began to run furiously, distracting the entire office.

5. With an extra long trip
It is a red flag if the candidate is late for the interview. Especially if it is due to a long trip. I am also concerned if the candidate complains about the commute, parking, or traffic. Some good people stopped working after only a few weeks on the job because the commute was too much. Some people can handle the overtime or will move in search of the right opportunity, but many will be repeatedly late for work or simply quit.

If you want to mention something that you feel is out of line with the culture, please do so * after * receiving the offer :)

I interview a lot of people. As COO and advisor, I had a say in direct hiring about two dozen people last year alone, and I interviewed a multiple of that number. Over the years, I have hired hundreds of people.

An automatic no for me is a glaring inauthenticity. If I have the strong impression that they are false, it is over. There is nothing worse than working alongside fake ones. I tell people over and over again, always bring your authentic self to an interview. Never be something that you are not because that, "pretending" is difficult to sustain, and for what reason? Find a company t

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I interview a lot of people. As COO and advisor, I had a say in direct hiring about two dozen people last year alone, and I interviewed a multiple of that number. Over the years, I have hired hundreds of people.

An automatic no for me is a glaring inauthenticity. If I have the strong impression that they are false, it is over. There is nothing worse than working alongside fake ones. I tell people over and over again, always bring your authentic self to an interview. Never be something that you are not because that, "pretending" is difficult to sustain, and for what reason? Find a company that appreciates its authenticity.

Another is not when someone takes credit for someone else's work or exaggerates their accomplishments. I know of a consultant who claimed to have created an Excel spreadsheet that I knew was not her own. In fact, I asked her a second time who created it, to give her a way out in case she was wrong, and she still claimed that she is the author of the document. We finished after that.

Others have falsified something on their resume. I once had someone who couldn't tell me about their work history without looking at their own resume. I soon realized that it was not his resume! I asked the candidate if I could see their resume, and then I started questioning the candidate about the jobs listed, including one I made up, and they played along. I suspect it was also a stolen identity.

When a candidate begins to tell me how he is somehow a victim of something, I pass. I try not to hire people who see themselves as victims in life. I have hired many who have overcome difficulties and talk about what they learned and how they overcame whatever challenges they had in front of them. I'm looking for the ones who are self-reliant, the ones who don't need to be directed and have an idea of ​​where they want to go in life. I don't want to work alongside someone who just wants to get by.

I love what I do because I can work with people who are much smarter than me and who are also highly motivated. I learn a lot in my role and his talent keeps him exciting for me. I am never afraid of Mondays nor do I get excited because it is Friday because I love what I do and that is because I am surrounded by many talented people.

EDIT: I get more messages about this answer than any other on Quora. One has to do with nervousness. I've never overlooked anyone because they were nervous, never. It's a normal human quality and when they tell me that, it's okay.

The second question that I get very often is that people all too often feel like they are rejected because of some narrow criteria that they don't meet. The point is, not every company will be a perfect fit, and when it isn't, move on to something that is. There are many ways to run a business and they all have their own criteria. Should they? That is a completely different question. The point I'm making in general is that being who you are matters a lot to me in the hiring process. That will give you a more favorable appearance than the one you list on your resume. Also talk about where you want to go, rather than focusing on where you were. When I hire, I tend to think about the direction of the company, so how you fit into that mission counts for a lot.

A2A.

Increasingly difficult questions.

October 2018,
Redmond, WA.

I was part of a cycle of interviews with Jessica. She was a college student from a renowned school who was approaching her graduation date. She had arrived for the interview a few minutes before the time, she looked calm and rested and her eyes were really sparkling with genuine excitement.

Over the next few hours, some of us on my team interviewed her. When it was my turn, I started with some of my usual scenarios. I asked him to tell me about one of the interesting Computer Vision projects on his resume. Jess began with the overview of the p

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A2A.

Increasingly difficult questions.

October 2018,
Redmond, WA.

I was part of a cycle of interviews with Jessica. She was a college student from a renowned school who was approaching her graduation date. She had arrived for the interview a few minutes before the time, she looked calm and rested and her eyes were really sparkling with genuine excitement.

Over the next few hours, some of us on my team interviewed her. When it was my turn, I started with some of my usual scenarios. I asked him to tell me about one of the interesting Computer Vision projects on his resume. Jess started with an overview of the problem, defined it well, and then told me what different options he had considered to solve it. She explained how some quick prototypes helped her focus on the neural network approach that she eventually took, and how it was a great choice for her scenario. She was able to answer my questions very quickly and well as to why a couple of other options were not used. She really knew her project well and I realized right away that she had depth and was very passionate about her work.

Then I asked her to dive into a problem with me that we would work on together, but she would drive. For the next 20 minutes, we used a couple of whiteboards to dig deep into the problem space, tackle corner cases, expand and adjust various scope parameters of the problem, and evolve it from an abstract idea to a product design. It went from a simple problem to a complex one that needed a lot of thought.

We then spent a solid 10 minutes sitting and chatting; Jess asked me a lot of very difficult questions about my team and my work and actually made me think hard to answer some of them.

4 months later, he joined the team.

What is the biggest green flag during a job interview?

Increasingly difficult questions.

As a candidate, it is often a green flag if the interviewer has changed the subject from breadth to depth; if they have started to make the problem more complex and enjoy working with you to come up with solutions. Many interviewers will do this when they have evaluated you as a candidate to be above a certain level and now want to push you and see how high you can go.

As an interviewer, it is often a green flag when the candidate asks you very insightful and well thought out questions, when they refer to points you have made and come back with questions about them. It often means that they have paid close attention and are genuinely interested in the position. When they go beyond the standard question template and do the difficult ones that also make you think hard, you know you've found a good match.


In case we haven't met before, I'm Rohan Kamath.
Thank you for reading. I hope I can help you reflect today. :)

The Ladders and TechRepublic have published articles listing strong and interesting questions to ask interviewers. In fact, I have two of those items on my hard drive; here is the first one:

These are your questions for the interviewer

Date: October 5, 2010

Author: Toni Bowers

The first few times I interviewed for a job, I found myself speechless when the tables turned and the interviewer asked me if I had any questions.

My silence was due in part to the fact that the question was unexpected. But sometimes I didn't have any questions because I clarified points during the interview and had all my questions.

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The Ladders and TechRepublic have published articles listing strong and interesting questions to ask interviewers. In fact, I have two of those items on my hard drive; here is the first one:

These are your questions for the interviewer

Date: October 5, 2010

Author: Toni Bowers

The first few times I interviewed for a job, I found myself speechless when the tables turned and the interviewer asked me if I had any questions.

My silence was due in part to the fact that the question was unexpected. But sometimes I didn't have any questions because I clarified points during the interview and I already had all my questions answered. And, I admit, sometimes I just wanted the interview to end so I could go to my car and breathe again.

But the truth is, interviewers want you to ask questions and they want to see what kind of questions you ask. Here are the types of questions you shouldn't and shouldn't ask:

  • Do not ask about salary, vacation time, employee benefits, time allowed for lunch, etc., in the first interview. Although these areas are totally relevant to the job, you don't want to give the impression that you are primarily concerned with them.
  • Don't ask when you can ditch the job in question and move into an influential position. You may be thinking that, but there is a better way to ask. Ask how success will be measured. Ask the interviewer what he sees you doing in six months or a year if he joins the company. Ask about training or career development opportunities.
  • Be careful that your nerves do not make you ask a question whose answer has already been provided earlier in the interview. There is nothing worse than explaining the history of a company and then having a candidate ask you what exactly the company does. Listen to the interviewer and ask questions about what they are saying.

Here are some more suggested questions:

Can you describe the culture of the company? This is a good way to get to know the company and its employees informally.

What employees and departments will I work with most often? Interviewers appreciate the broader view than just "what will I do?"

What are the strengths and weaknesses of the company? In addition to feeling vindicated by returning this dreaded question to an interviewer, you can also gain interesting information. If the interviewer says that he personally doesn't care about the mandatory participation in the company's bowling league, well, that's it.

What attracted you to this organization? This shows your interest in the interviewer as a person and also implies that you respect that person enough to want their personal opinion. The unspoken meaning is "If someone as cool as you were drawn to this company, I'd be interested to know what."

Describe what a typical day would be like for me. Interviewers will often highlight the duties of a job. You can get a little more information if you have to describe a normal day.

And here is the second article:

10 ridiculously smart questions to ask in a job interview

By Rachel Weingarten, The Ladders, August 1, 2017

In a crowded job market, the last thing you want to be is forgettable. Yet people do it every day with this one mistake: not asking questions in a job interview.

The error is understandable. You've been so busy preparing to answer questions that you forget to show the curiosity that allows interviewers to see what you really want to know. After all, even if each and every one of your answers is flawless and on time, if you don't ask your interviewer a question or two, you risk coming off as generic.

On the other hand, you don't want to ask terrible questions. That is even worse.

Here's how to show the person interviewing you how you are different and why you stand out from the crowd.

Why did you join the company?

Mark Phillips, who runs a major office for Sanford Rose Associates, one of the largest recruiting networks in the US, had a simple question that could be quite complicated. If the interviewer tells you it was for vacation days or benefits, chances are there isn't much below the surface. However, if they inform you about the creativity or integrity of the brand, you know that you are potentially going to work for a winner.

How does this role promote the mission of the company?

Kelly Lavin, chief talent officer for Canvas, the world's first text-based interview platform, suggests you ask this because “While it is important to understand job duties and company culture, determining why a company exists and a role is the same. if not more important. "It will also allow you to better understand if you" align with the mission of the company and will have a sense of purpose in your new role. "

Tell me about your most successful employees. What do they do differently?

Believe it or not, this is almost a trick question for potential employers, Lavin says. "Answering this question will help the candidate understand how a company defines success and what specific behaviors can lead to that success." In one fell swoop, you will find out what success means to this company and how you can best achieve it.

What do you expect someone in this position to accomplish in the first 60 to 90 days?

University of Richmond Career Advisor Anna Young says, "Great candidates start right away, find out how they're expected to get involved, and start contributing to the organization from day one." And in case you're wondering, it's okay to tweak the question for an internship and ask about expectations for the first few weeks.

What, if there is something, in my background does it give you a pause?

Roberta Matuson, president of Matuson Consulting, says this is pretty much the question job seekers should ask themselves in an interview. She says, "By asking this question, you will be able to overcome any objections the interviewer may have before leaving the room." And if you're smart, you can find a way to combat any preconceived notions by addressing them in a follow-up note.

What is the turnover in your company, in the executive suite and in the department for which I am interviewing?

Dave Arnold, president of Arnold Partners, says that as a leading independent CFO search consultant for technology companies, you've had hundreds of people come out to interview clients and think that's a question worth asking. While people no longer expect to stay in a certain job for decades or more, it's good to know how long you can expect to stay if given the opportunity. If the interviewer is uncomfortable or shares the fact that the change in your company is greater than that of Dancing with the Stars, you may want to think twice before accepting the position.

What are the opportunities for growth and advancement?

Young says, "This can help you understand the structure of the organization and whether there are opportunities to move up and advance in your career." It's also a great way to learn about various ways to progress or move into different roles. "Also, it could help you learn if they offer ongoing training or professional development for employees."

If you had the opportunity to re-interview for your company (knowing what you know now), what questions would you ask next time?

Ashley White, executive director of Human Resources for APQC, a member-based nonprofit that produces benchmarks and research best practices, suggested this difficulty.

This one is a bit sneaky because it also allows you to surreptitiously monitor the interviewer's hidden signals. Do they suddenly look uncomfortable before launching the company line? Do you receive this with a giant smile? You may have more answers to this question for what they don't say than even what they share.

What have I not asked most of the candidates?

Phillips also suggested asking this question, which sets him apart right away. On the one hand, you are pooling all the other applicants and showing a confidence level; on the other hand, you are getting information about your potential competitors - they asked this, but it didn't even occur to me.

One last thing: in order not to spend the next few days or weeks with pins and needles, it is always a promising idea to ask the following question.

What are the next steps in this process?

Young says, "If they haven't shared this information yet, it's important to ask about their schedule so you know when you might be notified of a second interview or a possible offer."

What to ask you

Shannon Breuer, president of the Wiley Group, was one of 800 laid off at her previous job. Shannon now draws on her own personal experience to provide clients with career counseling and transition services. She offers a list of questions to ask yourself before an interview and, if necessary, you can flip them over and ask the interviewer.

· What level of work-life balance do you want to enjoy?

· How casual do you like to dress?

· Is your ideal employer a promising small business or a century-old corporation with time-tested values ​​and a clear path for future promotions?

· Do you like the management style of the leadership team?

· What are the company initiatives you can support?

That's what I have on file. You don't have to ask everyone, but asking a few will rank you as a better candidate.

It is quite common for the hiring process, from application to offer, to be completed in a week. In many places, like Silicon Valley, there is intense competition for good software engineering talent. So companies move pretty fast through the hiring process. It is not a red flag in itself. It just means that the company trusts that you are a good fit and they like to close it as soon as possible.

It's also common for some large companies to have rigid processes and require hiring committee and compensation committee approval before a bid can be extended. These commit

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It is quite common for the hiring process, from application to offer, to be completed in a week. In many places, like Silicon Valley, there is intense competition for good software engineering talent. So companies move pretty fast through the hiring process. It is not a red flag in itself. It just means that the company trusts that you are a good fit and they like to close it as soon as possible.

It's also common for some large companies to have rigid processes and require hiring committee and compensation committee approval before a bid can be extended. These committees usually meet on certain days of the week. At one point, the CEOs of Google and Yahoo personally approved all the offers. I'm not sure if they continue the approval process now. Typically, it would take several weeks for the offer to process at these companies. For this reason, other Silicon Valley startups like to move fast and use speed as one of their competitive advantages in hiring.

At Quora, we have team members who review incoming requests every day. For a promising candidate, we respond quickly. In fact, the main reason for the delay is the applicant's availability for interviews, not recruiting and interviewer skills. Sometimes the candidate deliberately slows down the process so that they can align all the interviews and possible offers based on their schedules. After the on-site interviews, we usually make a hiring decision the same day or the next day with a brief report between all the interviewers. The hiring manager makes the decision, not a committee. So if the applicant's schedule allows, we could complete the entire process in one week.

Congratulations on receiving the offer! Don't read too much in the processing time. It varies from company to company. It's best to collect other signals to determine if the feature and offering is right for you.

Not at all. In fact, it is a good thing. However, I recommend that you do not accept the offer immediately. You need time to absorb everything that you have been told. The offer, of course $$, the benefits, the company, the boss. I recommend that you thank them very much for the offer and I suggest that you have a lot to think about. If it is Monday or Tuesday, tell them that you can give them your answer before Friday. Any other day, one week from Friday. Once they offer it, they won't withdraw it while you're thinking about it. They may ask why you doubt.

At this time, you will find out if there are

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Not at all. In fact, it is a good thing. However, I recommend that you do not accept the offer immediately. You need time to absorb everything that you have been told. The offer, of course $$, the benefits, the company, the boss. I recommend that you thank them very much for the offer and I suggest that you have a lot to think about. If it is Monday or Tuesday, tell them that you can give them your answer before Friday. Any other day, one week from Friday. Once they offer it, they won't withdraw it while you're thinking about it. They may ask why you doubt.

At that point, you will find out if there is room for negotiation. You may have other opportunities in the chute that you would like to consider. Even if you don't have any, you can have another one within the mentioned days.

I was once offered a position that gave me everything I wanted except three weeks of vacation (they offered two). Several calls later offered me more money, but two weeks. My answer was "Money is not the problem, it is the three weeks I want." They finally came back.

I had another situation where I knew an offer was coming and I struggled because I knew they would accept almost any $$ that I listed, but I wanted to know that I would feel comfortable as well as the company. It took me several days to figure it out.

A learning mindset. All jobs require some form of training and onboarding that depends on an open mind and a willingness to learn and adapt to a new environment.

Familiarity with the company. Instead of applying the "shotgun approach" by presenting your CV to 50 companies, choose 2 or 3 and apply carefully. Study companies and understand their purpose, business model, and the types of activities they would likely be involved with.

Strategic questions. No job description or interview out there reveals the full scope of a job and long-term opportunities. Through genuine curiosity you can ask various rel

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A learning mindset. All jobs require some form of training and onboarding that depends on an open mind and a willingness to learn and adapt to a new environment.

Familiarity with the company. Instead of applying the "shotgun approach" by presenting your CV to 50 companies, choose 2 or 3 and apply carefully. Study companies and understand their purpose, business model, and the types of activities they would likely be involved with.

Strategic questions. No job description or interview out there reveals the full scope of a job and the long-term opportunities. Through genuine curiosity you can ask several relevant questions regarding your day-to-day, the intrinsic motivation of the existing team, the company policy or anything else relevant to your skills, and how you can apply them in practice.

Skills match. The closer your profile to the job description, the more likely it is to receive an offer. Onboarding may take a couple weeks or span across 6–9 months depending on your familiarity with the industry and the job. Former experience (or extensive study) within that area will help alleviate the initial friction and you’ll become more productive.

A reason to stay. A sense of purposefulness and commitment to the company and the job. An indirect reason which would keep you around for a few years without having to look for alternative job offers every now and then.

Clear communication. Communication is an important factor during interviews as it’s a requirement for any type of job. Being able to clearly articulate your goals and showcase your skills is a key factor during the interview.

Team spirit. You will also interact with various colleagues and managers within the organization - which is why a team spirit is important. While it’s not something that you can state in your CV (even though many try to), make sure that you explicitly mention the importance of a healthy working culture and a strong bond between team members.

Expectativas salariales. Las expectativas de pago razonables dentro de las normas del mercado son importantes para las pequeñas y medianas empresas. No todas las empresas pueden permitirse el lujo de talentos mejor pagados o están dispuestas a comprometerse con esas expectativas de inmediato durante una entrevista.

Déjame darte mi ejemplo.

Soy básicamente de Gandhidham, que está en el distrito de Kachchh y cuando estaba en mi último año de B.com, nuestra universidad celebró un seminario para el trabajo e invitó a TCS a venir y seleccionar candidatos de nuestra universidad. Luego también llené el formulario de solicitud en línea y pasé esa prueba y luego recibí un correo sobre el proceso de selección en TCS - Gandhinagar. Y luego pensé en dejar esa oportunidad ya que la distancia era de aproximadamente 350 kms. de mi ciudad Gandhidham.

But then my family insisted that I take that opportunity and try the same thing. I came h

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Let me give you my example.

I am basically from Gandhidham which is in Kachchh district and when I was in my last year of B.com our university held a seminar for the job and invited TCS to come and select candidates from our university. Then I also filled out the online application form and passed that test and then received an email about the selection process at TCS - Gandhinagar. And then I thought about leaving that opportunity since the distance was approximately 350 kms. from my city Gandhidham.

But then My family insisted me to grab that opportunity and give a try for the same. I came here for interview and by the evening time I got selected for the job. I was very happy as I want to take good experience and make better career opportunities by getting selected in such MNC. I also informed my family and friends about selection and they were also happy for me. And now it has been a month joining TCS.

So If you are interested and willing to take up the desired oppurtunity and face challenges and make a better future for yourself, then you must give a try and go for interview and give your best.

I hope you will be going for interview.

And also All the Best for all reading this answer and wish you have a good future ahead.

Leave a upvote if you liked my answer.

Thank you.

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