What are the most innovative startups in recruiting?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Jessica Dawson



What are the most innovative startups in recruiting?

There are three general groupings that fascinate me right now:

# 1 - "App Filters": making up those terms, but basically referring to companies like Bright.com and Evolv (product) that use big data, machine learning, etc. to help companies better rank their candidates. This is extremely useful in high volume situations where the number of applicants for a position is very high. I am optimistic both about these companies and others like them.

# 2 - "Data Driven Sourcing": This is the category that Entelo (product) plays in and there are others like Gild and Dice.com (company) that are innovative

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There are three general groupings that fascinate me right now:

# 1 - "App Filters": making up those terms, but basically referring to companies like Bright.com and Evolv (product) that use big data, machine learning, etc. to help companies better rank their candidates. This is extremely useful in high volume situations where the number of applicants for a position is very high. I am optimistic both about these companies and others like them.

# 2 - "Data Driven Sourcing" - This is the category that Entelo (product) plays in and there are others like Gild and Dice.com (company) that are innovating in this category. Over the next decade, it will become clearer that a "whole web" approach will provide much more powerful sources than simply searching a single social network or resume database.

# 3 - "Hiring Markets" - Hired (company) (now Hired) is probably the best example of this. While I'm not sure how scalable these models are, they are the smartest recruiting hack we've seen in a long time.

WhistleTalk is one of the most innovative startups in recruiting referrals!

Check out this ProductNation link! & Top 10 Finalists Announced for InTech's 50 Most Innovative India Products: Altizon!
We are one of the selected in the top 10 innovative startups in India and only one in the recruitment space.

Our company is WhistleTalk and to learn about the innovation behind it and our philosophy, please go through this quick slide. It's very interesting: http://whistletalk.com/ui.html#Q2FtcGFpZ25EcmVhbUpvYnNWaWV3

Our Product Features:
1. Share your company's hidden jobs with your friends. That way we bring

Keep reading

WhistleTalk is one of the most innovative startups in recruiting referrals!

Check out this ProductNation link! & Top 10 Finalists Announced for InTech's 50 Most Innovative India Products: Altizon!
We are one of the selected in the top 10 innovative startups in India and only one in the recruitment space.

Our company is WhistleTalk and to learn about the innovation behind it and our philosophy, please go through this quick slide. It's very interesting: http://whistletalk.com/ui.html#Q2FtcGFpZ25EcmVhbUpvYnNWaWV3

Our Product Features:
1. Share your company's hidden jobs with your friends. That way, we pull out all the jobs across your entire network of friends and thus easily land on your next dream job.

2. Exclusive referral hiring solution for companies where company employees and the hiring manager make use of their social network to bring in candidates.

3. Mobile application for Android and iOS for company employees to share their company jobs with them instantly anywhere and anytime.

Identified.com has received a lot of media attention lately as the rising star in the world of social recruiting and sourcing.

Okay, I'm a marketing intern for Identified.com. It may seem a bit biased, but the work and tools we have created for recruiters can definitely make life a lot easier and also provide them with disruptive techniques to find the best talent for their companies. .

New to Social Recruitment?
We have webinars that can help you get through the door in the social recruiting game!
-> http://employers.identified.com/webinar/social-recruitment-strategy/

GooodJob's cutting edge social recruiting platform (http://gooodjob.com/) provides organizations with an effective solution to low levels of engagement in employee referral programs. We offer an easy-to-use, yet sophisticated platform that companies can use to leverage employee social media and reach quality candidates, while motivating and rewarding employee efforts.

What else makes us innovative? We have something for every type of organization! Most recently, our free Facebook racing tab has been causing a sensation in the online community around the world. You can see the Onrec rev

Keep reading

GooodJob's cutting edge social recruiting platform (http://gooodjob.com/) provides organizations with an effective solution to low levels of engagement in employee referral programs. We offer an easy-to-use, yet sophisticated platform that companies can use to leverage employee social media and reach quality candidates, while motivating and rewarding employee efforts.

What else makes us innovative? We have something for every type of organization! Most recently, our free Facebook racing tab has been causing a sensation in the online community around the world. You can see the Onrec review here: http://www.onrec.com/news/launch/gooodjob-releases-free-facebook-career-tab

There are many exciting new recruiting companies out there. Talent search engines are all the rage. I'm looking forward to seeing more mobile recruiting products and my company is trying to make a dent in there with apps like InstaJob. Check it out at instajobapp.com

OnMyWay.com is the newest and best player I have ever seen in space.

For finding candidates and adding social information, the site really does a good job. They provide their profiles on the phone / email, which has been a great advantage for us.

I also used Talentbin for tech positions and it was very good, but lacking in detail.

I'll keep you informed

I'll tackle the recruiting part of the question:

Getting your company and your message heard among everyone else is the trickiest part of recruiting talent. The low cost of a LinkedIn Premium account, the increased use of web scraping tools that can find information, and an agency model that rewards quality over quantity, has led to an increase in the number of recruiting emails targeted at passive talents.

Engineers can receive 10-20 messages from recruiters every week, if not every day. I myself receive at least one or two messages a week, the last one was from a company that misspelled my name and

Keep reading

I'll tackle the recruiting part of the question:

Getting your company and your message heard among everyone else is the trickiest part of recruiting talent. The low cost of a LinkedIn Premium account, the increased use of web scraping tools that can find information, and an agency model that rewards quality over quantity, has led to an increase in the number of recruiting emails targeted at passive talents.

Engineers can receive 10-20 messages from recruiters every week, if not every day. I myself receive at least one or two messages a week, the last one was from a company that misspelled my name and offered me an entry-level position. Receiving messages as makes it less likely that you will open the next message. Now, many talented people just ignore every message that comes through, even if the role is something that fits their abilities and interests.

So how do you make your posts stand out? You need to create compelling messages that match the person's potential professional background and interests. A senior software engineer should receive an email for a senior, leader, or managerial role. Do not email a full-time employee an offer for a hiring position. Don't email a corporate sales executive about an inside sales position. And be sure to refer to a skill that the person has. (For example, don't email a marketing manager that references your skills with Marketo unless you know they have worked with Marketo.)

The next step is to try to identify what motivates your recipient or what would get them excited about a new role. The beauty of LinkedIn and the other social media platforms that contain information about potential employees is that there is a lot of it. If you gather the information, you can guess pretty well what kind of career change your prospect would consider.

Some examples:

  • An engineer who works with Java at his current company, but has a github account full of Go projects, is probably interested in working with new technology. Send him a message about this.
  • A marketing coordinator with a well-written lifestyle blog would likely be interested in a content marketing position.
  • An account manager who has been with your company for 5 years would probably be interested

It sounds corny, but putting yourself in your potential customer's shoes for 30 seconds and trying to understand what they might want to do next makes a huge difference. It added a human aspect to your message and increased the likelihood that it will stand out from the crowd of emails.

  1. Plan ahead
  2. Work backwards

Startups are not businesses. Being an employee of a startup is not like being an employee of a sustainable company. Founders tend not to operate as executives and have no human resources. For all these reasons and more, you need to think differently.

Start by reading about what it means to be a startup.

I'm a fan of Steve Blank's definition that a startup is a temporary company looking for a business model.

Which means a few things:

  1. It won't last, as is
  2. It's very unpredictable
  3. Has no sustainable income
  4. It will probably fail.

In fact, I'm a bit of a detractor of

Keep reading
  1. Plan ahead
  2. Work backwards

Startups are not businesses. Being an employee of a startup is not like being an employee of a sustainable company. Founders tend not to operate as executives and have no human resources. For all these reasons and more, you need to think differently.

Start by reading about what it means to be a startup.

I'm a fan of Steve Blank's definition that a startup is a temporary company looking for a business model.

Which means a few things:

  1. It won't last, as is
  2. It's very unpredictable
  3. Has no sustainable income
  4. It will probably fail.

In fact, I'm a bit of a detractor of the idea that startups have jobs.

Many will disagree with me, and will even prove me wrong (showing "startups" that they are hiring), but I would refer to those points and argue that those things are no longer really startups or that it is not fair to call what they have "jobs. ".

We know what jobs mean, culturally. While they are not guaranteed, they are reasonably stable, pay, and offer benefits.

Startups cannot provide them.

So how do you approach working at a startup? (Investors hate when I share this notion, because they argue that the money invested is somehow more significant or better than your time / reputation / out-of-pocket expenses) ...

Consider working for a startup as an investor.

Will you give a refund?

You will pay less, if at all. You may not have benefits (although some help pay for health insurance before wages are paid). You'll change job descriptions while you're there. You will likely look for another job in 6 to 18 months. That works for a startup.

And that's a key phrase, if you want to work with startups, think of it like working * with * startups; it doesn't work for a startup.

Your job is you.

You take care of yourself and have a job "working with startups".

As in many. As in, something else next year.

This does not work for Dell or Deep Eddy Vodka.

I talk about it a lot, I wrote a little. Here's a shot.

How do you view the compensation arrangement? Is the * investment * worth it?

Money is only a small part and if that's your priority, you probably shouldn't work for startups (get a job at a company, even a company that calls itself * startup * if that makes everyone feel better) .

You should also consider:

  • Experience
  • Passion
  • Time used
  • Impact on your reputation
  • Future
  • Equity and property
  • Will that equity be worth anything? (Not likely)

That sounds like similar advice to someone considering a job, but it's not because those considerations matter A LOT more ... Keep in mind that salary, commitment, stability, and benefits are much less secure, so you should take advantage of the other things, even more. , for you.

Now, having done all that, how do you find startups looking for employees?

2. You have planned ahead now, haven't you?

You know that the company will probably fail. You have discovered what you need and expect.

He has also set his mind on what will come next, when that company pivots, fails or changes in such a way that he is on what happens.

That would mean ...

  • You have a well-developed LinkedIn profile (you're planning ahead to be someone who works with startups, right?)
  • You built the other appropriate channels for yourself.
    • Github if you are a developer
    • A website if you are a designer or marketer
    • Maybe a side business if you are on the financial or legal side of things

Knowing that the "job" probably won't last, I look forward to seeing you preparing for your future and skillfully using your skills to do so.

2. Now work backwards.

Go ahead, for a job, you are looking for job openings, contacting manager or HR, applying, etc. Yes?

So work backwards ...

  • Apply yourself. Get the job done and show you're perfect for it.
  • Communicate with the team
  • Explore working with them

That's pretty hard to explain without an example, so let's try one ...

MediaTech Ventures, my company, doesn't really "hire."

There are tons of work and opportunities, but we still think like a startup.

I can post a job and examine resumes and applications OR I can speak to the clearly passionate people who come to us.

Given what we do, someone who applies themselves would clearly be someone who is mentoring startups, producing podcasts for companies, helping big companies start up, or creating media communities.

You can do it right now.

That would be applying you in a meaningful way to our "start-up."

Then he would contact us. That is not difficult to do, we are on the Internet.

Over time, or as relevant (something you would discover), we get to know each other, maybe have coffee and explore the opportunity to work together.

Could you point out that we could….

Or could I mention that we really need help with ...

And boom.

Look, you "find" jobs with startups by applying yourself to the task and then finding the startups. Because it's the other way around, they don't look for you, they don't have the typical resources or stability to hire anyone. The teams we build, the teams that build startups, are teams of entrepreneurs who start by themselves; so do that.

For the record, I am not affiliated with the following companies.

Let's take a second to digest the term first. "Social recruitment" is an oxymoron. The phenomenon of social media is supposed to connect people (candidates and hiring managers in this case) naturally, without any human facilitator, that is, the intervention of an intermediary. For example, I am connecting exceptionally well with my target audience here on Quora. Any company or marketer to promote my Quora posts? Here on Quora? See how ridiculous it sounds?

Connectifier - Recruiting Intelligence
I remember my awkward interview there a few years ago, a

Keep reading

For the record, I am not affiliated with the following companies.

Let's take a second to digest the term first. "Social recruitment" is an oxymoron. The phenomenon of social media is supposed to connect people (candidates and hiring managers in this case) naturally, without any human facilitator, that is, the intervention of an intermediary. For example, I am connecting exceptionally well with my target audience here on Quora. Any company or marketer to promote my Quora posts? Here on Quora? See how ridiculous it sounds?

Connectifier - Recruiting Intelligence
I remember my awkward interview there a few years ago, an introduction to the world of algorithmic puzzles from Google and Amazon.

  • AI (machine learning): check
  • ex-Googler technical leadership: check. It goes on and on. Taken literally from their website: "... our team relies on places like Google, Amazon, Stanford, Microsoft Research, NASA, Caltech, Carnegie Mellon, and Berkeley National Lab." I am flattered that they have noticed no one like me.
  • .Ai domain: I guess soon. Although their .com site is much more polished now.
  • $ 11.7 million raised according to Connectifier | crunchbase: awesome.
  • He went to LinkedIn: Bravo!

Connectifier is (was it - before it was acquired?) Trying to solve the same problem, as everyone else in that space: extracting and mapping bits and pieces from various sources, such as resume posting databases: (Dice, LinkedIn , etc.), general purpose social networks. networks, for example, Facebook and (hopefully) Quora, and professional communities like StackOverflow and GitHub.

There are many more relatively unknown skill ranking sources like geeks4geeeks, vying to be a part of those Machine Learning and Big Data searches. IMHO, why not save $ 11.7 million and use a trusted unbiased source like StackOverflow. But I will reserve my opinion on the vaporizer as Connectifier was not in Silicon Valley.

In any case, the goal is:

a) find candidates who don't want to be found (by recruiters)

b) classify them based on job requirements

Both of these tasks are getting exponentially more difficult every day due to the increasing number of (third world) resumes flooding IT hiring channels, along with the activity on social media from the same group of people struggling to get the job done. opportunity to get noticed. Posting most of the basic tutorials and semi-technical blog articles.

Bitvore
A few months after the Connectifier interview drama, I contacted another company, solving the same problem for a different market and from a different angle.

You can tell what I think about Connectifier. Bitvore is real. It opened my eyes to the disturbing current state of the most essential function of the Internet: search. Google has lost the battle with spammers. Most of whom are not even real writers, but robots that write infomercial content indistinguishable from real news and legitimate articles.

Ironic, huh? Half of VC-funded AI research is working to make those bots smarter, while the other half of AI startups are struggling to detect fake content. As I understand it, both technologies go hand in hand today. It's unclear whether smaller, more agile companies like Bitvore, much less Google, will win the war on spam.

The size of the data set is the problem in both cases. Connectifier and many other "AI" applications are completely unnecessary to do a simple StackOverflow search, as I pointed out earlier. Bitvore, which specializes in municipal bond research (at least when I interviewed them) could have created a unique place for legitimate sources to post that information and for investment professionals to consume it. In the ideal world.

Keep spammers out and (sorry I'm politically incorrect) BS third world resumes, that's it. Bring the IT job market back to its normal size, before a certain overcrowded country was annexed to it. The companies are still hiring from the same limited pool of qualified candidates. Software engineering is as difficult as medicine. The world did not see a recent exponential increase in capable physicians. No capable programmers. Only now it's impossible to find them among the cattle that flooded the resume posting and recruiting channels.

Don't analyze giant data sets that rival the NSA through Big Data algorithms. Reduce the size of the data set. StackOverflow is a bad solution for that. It is easy to defeat to get a high rank. For example, answering a million simple questions. Not to mention the questions and their answers can come from a group of scammers, malicious people with multiple accounts, or even bots.

And that still doesn't solve the problem of reaching the majority (or the only) qualified candidates: experts, who are not looking to be discovered by recruiters. Because no recruiter or even hiring manager can offer a penny on your current compensation. Not to mention any professional future. Everyone knows what Google and other top tech employers have to offer. It doesn't happen anywhere else.

Suppose some system analyzed your Facebook and Twitter posts and compared them to technology acronyms that consider you "technical." Whats Next? You still won't take a pay cut when the recruiter calls you.

Suppose someone runs a clever "social" marketing campaign showing the workplace of some company. You apply, find out it's a (significant) pay cut, and blacklist the company.

The 17-year-long corporate assault on middle-class wages isn't HR's fault, but don't add insult to injury. Medieval alchemy did not turn lead into gold. You also can't magically cover salary cuts of over $ 20K with beer dispensers in the office kitchen and the mythical "work-life balance." Sorry for the recruiters caught in the middle of that bullshit. Just pay more.

So here comes my first disruptive idea for social and other recruiting. How about commission-free (50% +)? A non-profit “cooperative” run by candidates and for candidates. 50% more in the candidate's pocket. I would have considered quitting my hated corporate job for that in the past. Social networks are perfect for that. Viral marketing. Community outreach. A place to vent and connect with your underpaid and oppressed brothers and sisters. Volunteers are welcome, but there are no paid intermediaries.

Some are probably thinking that there is a lot of room in that 50%. If I do, it will be zero. The question of principles. The only way to really be on the side of the candidate. Anything else, even a penny you take, is a lie.

I'm going to do it. Not only. And I welcome unlikely competition. It won't be in Silicon Valley. A typical startup today is founded by money, not people. Every investor requires paying customers. None in this case. Your paying clients, greedy employers, are the only reason you can't persuade good candidates, usually already employees, to work for your client. What are my expenses to run such a cooperative website? $ 20 / month. You don't need "paying customers". Do you have the balls to do something like that? Hit me

No need to run complex algorithms to extract unique candidates on social media - spotting lies, ranking achievements, and still losing a ton of talent - smart college students with no formal experience and capable engineers without MIT or Google credentials. Don't look for them. Let them come to you willingly. Let them know of a single place of trust, a single community that is unconditionally on their side, but more importantly, they will find jobs that pay 50% more.

That's only half the solution to curing the IT job market. I plan to eliminate the embarrassing 3-4x pay gap between top tech employers like Google and outsourced corporate IT. It is simply a matter of technology. 90% of IT projects fail due to severe (management) incompetence. 99 out of 100 engineers are just ballast for intermediaries to charge commissions. Get rid of those 99 and pay the remaining $ 400K like Google does. I bet some Google employees would be curious.

Number of employees 100 times less. There are no stupid middle managers to manage hundreds of code monkeys and write illiterate job descriptions for recruiters. No predatory recruiters. Just tight mini-Google everywhere, staffed with experts.

I know how to achieve 100x efficiency in my field: business software. It is not an exact science. Even if I chose a more conservative estimate of 10, commonly referred to as a "10x programmer," it still covers Google salaries. It is doable. And you can start small. There is no need to take IBM and Oracle out of business immediately. Let them enjoy your market share (which is continually shrinking) while doing something great. A small "gated community" of experts with complementary skills, for example sales and development. Operating outside the corporate world powered by Wall-Street and Silicon Valley powered by VC. Helping customers, blue chips and vaporware startups, they can't help.

You can learn a lot from years of hunting and hiring.

My grandfather owned a hunting and fishing lodge in Northern Ontario. And as you can imagine, I spent a lot of time "up north" as a kid.

He was an excellent businessman, but he was an even better hunter. His patient and precise approach to duck hunting meant that he almost always got the birds he wanted. Spending time with him blindly taught me some invaluable lessons that I have learned since then.

I have used those lessons throughout my career when I needed to "hunt down" great employees. You name it, CEOs, CFOs, COOs, I've hired them. TO

Keep reading

You can learn a lot from years of hunting and hiring.

My grandfather owned a hunting and fishing lodge in Northern Ontario. And as you can imagine, I spent a lot of time "up north" as a kid.

He was an excellent businessman, but he was an even better hunter. His patient and precise approach to duck hunting meant that he almost always got the birds he wanted. Spending time with him blindly taught me some invaluable lessons that I have learned since then.

I have used those lessons throughout my career when I needed to "hunt down" great employees. You name it, CEOs, CFOs, COOs, I've hired them. And I am based on the same principles that I learned to hunt ducks.

Know what you are looking for

When it comes to hiring, you need to know exactly what type of candidate you want. List all the traits that candidate would have. Do they need a certain number of years of experience? Should they be willing to travel? Do they have an MBA or other graduate degree?

Create your list and always keep it in mind. You need to understand who you are looking for before you start, otherwise you may end up with someone who does not meet your requirements.

When Grandpa set out to hunt, he knew he wanted to. I would be happy to bring Mallard Ducks, Blue Winged Teals, and Wood Ducks back to the lodge.

Don't shoot all the ducks you see.

Know what to ignore

Grandpa didn't just know which ducks he wanted. He also knew which ducks he didn't want. For example, I would never shoot fish ducks because they are famous for their terrible taste.

You also need to know what you don't want in a candidate.

I know of a CEO who gave the keynote speech at a COO training seminar, simply because he wanted to find a COO. He ended up dismissing almost everyone at the convention because they were late for the training seminar. He didn't want someone to ignore the training, and he stuck with it, even when it meant getting rid of a lot of qualified candidates.

Knowing what you don't want in a candidate is so important when looking for the right hire.

Don't be afraid to leave with nothing

There were days in the duck blind where we didn't fire a single shot. As a 14 year old boy who loved to shoot, that was torture for me. But it taught me the value of patience. My grandfather said he would rather go without a single duck than go with a bad one.

When hiring, don't pick a candidate you don't like because you're desperate for someone.

I had to put this lesson into practice multiple times. I was once involved in a company that was looking for a fearless COO who could transition a company through tough times. A director and I narrowed 150 resumes down to 16 final candidates. Then we flew to Boston to interview them.

After multiple interviews with each candidate, none of us could identify a candidate who surprised us. This was a tremendously important hire and there was a lot of pressure on us to do it, but we had to trust our instincts.

We fly home empty handed.

Remember, it is always better to walk away with nothing than to walk away with the wrong candidate.

Preparation is key

Sometimes we could afford to go home empty-handed because there was no rush. There would always be another day. We didn't have to get a duck.

But many companies are in the opposite situation. They only hire when a gap appears. At that time, patience is no longer possible. They need someone now.

To avoid this, plan for your hiring needs for at least one year. Why? Because fighting to hire someone is a surefire way to land the wrong candidate. Filling in the gaps as they open leads to compromises, snap decisions, and less-than-ideal hires.

You put yourself in a situation where grandpa's advice no longer works. You have to go home with a duck if there is nothing else to eat.

Have a plan in place for low growth, medium growth, and hyper growth so that you are prepared for any situation.

I will always remember those hunting trips fondly for my grandfather, because the lessons I learned have helped me recruit some fantastic employees over the years. Hopefully, they will do the same for you.

I have no experience with the locations you mentioned, but what we are doing is most likely still applicable.

When I recruit people for a new or early stage company, I apply the following rules:

  • Hire for attitude and integration, train for skills - Today's business is all about teamwork, so you need a person who adds value to your team and creates a synergy effect (when the team performs better than only a sum of individual performances); it is much easier (although not as easy as I would like) to train someone to learn what you are doing than to change their personality and their work
Keep reading

I have no experience with the locations you mentioned, but what we are doing is most likely still applicable.

When I recruit people for a new or early stage company, I apply the following rules:

  • Hiring for attitude and integration, training for skills - Today's business is about teamwork, so you need a person who adds value to your team and creates a synergy effect (when the team performs better than only a sum of individual performances); It is much easier (although not as easy as I would like) to train someone to learn what you are doing than to change their personality and work attitude, and what you definitely do not want is someone who breaks your team spirit. Hire great attitude and great skills, but these types of people are real unicorns and you won't find them easily.
  • Explore your personal contacts - the best people I have ever hired are either my personal acquaintances or people referred to me by friend's or colleagues; don't forget your college/high-school friends, even the ones you haven't found great during your studies, people evolve, you can be surprised how positive changes they make
  • An awesome engineer/salesman can be worth 10 mediocre - if you are a start-up that aims at delivering high-end products you cannot afford low-quality people to join you and you need to have an eye for it; bad guy at important place in your business can inflict serious damage and even ruin your start-up; my answer on the following questions might be handy as well: Matt Kurleto's answer to Should an early-stage start-up ever hire junior engineers?
  • Don't be afraid to outsource - you need to hire people that are key players in your core business, side-competences are often better to outsource; you can learn more about how can you benefit from this concept, where I've shown some arguments for outsourcing MVP development by a software-house: Matt Kurleto's answer to For a first venture, is it better to start a custom software development company or is it better to build a software product of your own?

Of I can help you in anyway with this challenge don't hesitate to contact.

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