What are the job prospects in Ireland after a master's degree in computer science for non-European students?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Harry Young



What are the job prospects in Ireland after a master's degree in computer science for non-European students?

Disclaimer | Long and informative read | Reading time: 6 minutes (approx.)

In fact, this is one of the most frequently asked questions on Quora / My LinkedIn Inbox.

I have been fortunate to be closely associated with both students and professionals in the domain of computer science. I have done extensive research on the Irish job market and made some fantastic connections during the period I lived in Ireland, which is why I am eligible to answer this question.

Let's look at this question and consider non-European students coming to Ireland in three categories.

Category A: newcomers, 0 to 1 year of age

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Disclaimer | Long and informative read | Reading time: 6 minutes (approx.)

In fact, this is one of the most frequently asked questions on Quora / My LinkedIn Inbox.

I have been fortunate to be closely associated with both students and professionals in the domain of computer science. I have done extensive research on the Irish job market and made some fantastic connections during the period I lived in Ireland, which is why I am eligible to answer this question.

Let's look at this question and consider non-European students coming to Ireland in three categories.

Category A: Newborns, 0–1 year of work experience.

Main motivations for doing MS:

  1. To obtain a master's degree after completing a bachelor's degree.
  2. Unable to get desired job after bachelor's degree, therefore, he seeks better job prospects.
  3. Peer pressure or impact on social media (assuming a luxurious lifestyle after moving abroad).
  4. You cannot move to the US or Canada, therefore look to Ireland as an option.

Job outlook after MS in Ireland:

  1. Sorry to burst the bubble but you have little chance of landing a full time IT job in Ireland as it is a skills based market and work experience is a huge factor.

Alternative solution:

  1. Graduate Programs: The best option for this category would be to enroll in graduate programs that are implemented by almost all technology companies, including Tech Big4 (Microsoft, Apple, Google, Facebook) and Consulting Big 4 (KPMG, Deloitte, EY, PWC) . Companies are looking for some basic skills for these positions. Getting in can be competitive but fairly easy due to the large number of graduate programs that are implemented each year.
  • When to request it: October-December | From March to June, MS programs generally begin in the month of September and students can begin to apply for these programs. Typically, the interview process takes 1-3 months and the job begins in September of the next year, when the MS program will be completed. These are like full-time jobs, but generally in lower positions and with less pay, but they involve a lot of preparation.

List of some graduate programs:

2) Internship Positions: Internship positions deployed in Ireland are low. Also, these positions will be competitive due to European candidates who want to enter the market and have a valid work authorization. Students can communicate with startups and help them solve any existing problems using their skill set.

My advice:

  • Before making the decision to do a master's degree with some work experience at least 3 years, during this time save money, decide what domain you need to further your career in IT, such as Development, Analytics, Networking, Security, etc.
  • Choose a course / program that suits your work experience or area of ​​interest. Don't listen to consultants for course selection or opt for fad courses like data science, etc. Review the course modules, understand if the course aligns with your interests. I have met people who used to hate math but ended up choosing MS. in data science because they thought he had better career prospects.
  • Get some certifications if you are in a domain like Cybersecurity, Project Management, Networking, it will help you compete with Category B.
  • Go to universities instead of colleges for general learning and development of the Net and build as many connections as possible.

Category B: 3 to 7 years of work experience.

Main motivations for doing MS:

  1. Saturation in career progression or Looking for a change of domain.
  2. Desire to settle abroad.
  3. You want to move abroad with your spouse, etc.
  4. You want to increase profits.

Job outlook after MS in Ireland:

  1. The chances of getting a job are high, especially for people with more than 5 years of work experience. Full-time roles are available in all major domains, in the books, full ICT jobs are included in critical skills in Ireland; However, if we are talking about real critical job domains lacking manpower, they would be DevOps, Networking, Cybersecurity Professionals, Automation Developers (RPA UI Path), Automation QA Engineers (Selenium), IT Professionals Cloud (AWS, Azure), Java developers, React-Native developers, Python experts, Project-Scrum Roles. I wouldn't rank data science under that due to the greater availability of people trained in this domain.

My advice:

  1. The Irish job market has a different hiring process, selection process and interview process so do your research well, the platforms to apply are unique too, Linkedin, in fact Irish jobs are great websites to search opportunities. Few companies work on the strategy of "being found", they do not publish many jobs, so the important thing is to increase the reach of your network and learn about these companies and apply on their career website. Please change your CV according to the Irish standard and keep it short, max 2 pages, don't forget to send a cover letter along with the application. Don't forget to strengthen your LinkedIn game.
  2. Do not make a decision based on salary, everything over 40K / year should be included in a very high tax bracket. For example, if Person A earns 45,000 Euros / year and Person B earns 60,000 Euros / year, the difference between the two in terms of monthly take-home income would be only 600 Euros / month. Therefore, look for a better job role and a better company work culture.
  3. Be prepared for rejections, an ideal app for an interview call ratio would be 50: 1, so prepare to wake up reading 5-6 rejection emails, which can be very emotionally draining, but it's a numbers game, how much? The more you apply, the better the chances of receiving a call.

Category C: 7+ years of work experience.

Main motivations for doing MS / MBA.

  1. Advance to managerial positions by doing an MBA or MS.
  2. To settle abroad with family and children.
  3. Breaking the monotonous work lifestyle and saturation caused by bad work ethics and culture.

Job outlook after MS in Ireland:

The chances of getting a job are quite high compared to the other two categories. Between 60 and 70% of job seekers in Ireland are Millennials, so there is considerably less competition in leadership and senior positions.

These positions will be highly paid, so the candidate must show good leadership and management qualities. Candidates must also have a rationale for pursuing a ready MS / MBA.

My advice:

  1. If your goal is just to find a job, try to apply directly from your home country, with so much experience and successful portfolios the chances of getting a job directly become very high.

The best way to apply abroad while in your home country would be to write your desired job title and location and start applying, make sure your CV is in country format and when asked if you are eligible to work / work authorization in the respective country legally, select 'No'. You can also filter by 'Remote locations'.

  1. Make sure your family / spouse / children visit the country on a tourist visa before asking them to move here with you. Only invest your time, efforts in paperwork if you like the place and want to stay here for a few years. Although it is a beautiful country, some may not like it.

Image credits: Me;)

I hope it is now clear for non-European students to understand the IT work scene in Ireland.

Thanks for reading, you can also read my other answers below:

Prashant Chauhan's answer to Why should Indians study in Ireland?

Prashant Chauhan's answer to What are the challenges facing Indian students in Ireland?

Prashant Chauhan's response to job prospects in Ireland after a master's degree in data science? I was planning for the United States and I was building my profile. I went to a counselor and expressed my concerns regarding h1b visa issues, so he suggested that applying in Ireland can be very fruitful for me.

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After seeing this question on my feed, I feel like I'm sitting in the past and nervously spamming all the other students / professionals with the same question. Here are some screenshots of it. So I can totally understand the curiosity that comes with the question.

I arrived in Dublin on August 15, 2018 (Yes, this date;)). His mixed feelings implies excitement and nervousness for the new student life that I will start after 4 years of work in the software industry. I joined Trinity College Dublin for the September 2018 batch for a one year masters course. I have mentioned in my previous an

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After seeing this question on my feed, I feel like I'm sitting in the past and nervously spamming all the other students / professionals with the same question. Here are some screenshots of it. So I can totally understand the curiosity that comes with the question.

I arrived in Dublin on August 15, 2018 (Yes, this date;)). His mixed feelings implies excitement and nervousness for the new student life that I will start after 4 years of work in the software industry. I joined Trinity College Dublin for the September 2018 batch for a one year masters course. I have mentioned in my previous answers the reason why I chose Ireland. To reiterate a few:

  • There are many technology companies present in Ireland that provide ample opportunities for someone with a background in computer engineering. Many high-tech companies like Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, and a good presence that help create many top-tier engineering jobs.
  • Ireland has the top leaders in the financial industry. There are around 70 finance companies that are based in Ireland. Many of them have a software department that hires many students. Top Financial Services Companies on Top1000.ie
  • Ireland is an immigration friendly country. Many come to study for a master's degree and end up getting a job.

Brief details about my trip

As I already have experience in the software industry. I did not apply to any of the graduate programs that select students directly from the university. I started applying in April 2019. Having prior experience helped me put together a good CV and the addition of a master's degree helped make it look so much better.

I applied for some selective jobs in the software development field that I wanted to work on. Got 3 interviews on the site. I was able to delete 2 of those. I finally chose the Central Bank of Ireland because I wanted to work in the public sector.

Was it difficult to find a job?

I'd say it wasn't difficult. Continual preparation helped secure the job. But here I would like again to give more importance to the experience. Having experience especially in software development helped to get an interview / job.

Was a visa issued when applying for the job?

I felt that some company called me and when they found out that I have a student visa they would leave the call indicating some arbitrary reason. But I don't find them bad in any way as small businesses may not have enough resources / funds for the same. In my experience, medium and large scale companies never cared about the visa you have. They will take the interview and if you clarify it, other visa related issues will be resolved.

What would be the salary range I can expect?

This is a subjective question and many factors must be taken into account. I have answered something similar previously. Aman Ray's answer to How much salary can I expect after completing the Master of Science in Computer Science from University College Dublin / Trinity College Dublin?

My lot had around 35-40 students with different experiences and backgrounds. I can provide you with data that can give you perspective on the salaries that students received after graduating from the Master of Science in Computer Science.

The above salary is mentioned in euros.

This is the quick sheet that I have prepared based on my 2018 batch. I have made some minor changes to anonymize the data. The following are the conclusions that I can draw:

  • All large companies have a graduate program. Generally, the application begins in early September with the deadline until November. Dates may vary by company. In my experience, graduates in Ireland are in the range of 24,000 to 35,000. There may be some exceptions where a large tech company can offer more. But the average is around 30,000.
  • For experienced candidates, the salary range may vary based on position, year of experience, and knowledge of the domain. The data above shows that most graduate students with experience in the 2-4 range can earn a salary between 40,000 and 70,000.

This is specifically for Trinity College Dublin, but I can assume that UCD has a somewhat similar pattern. In addition, I am not concluding here that if you enter these courses you have the jobs insured. There are still students looking for work.

To conclude, I would say that the Master of Computer Science would open many new doors for you. Especially if you have experience on your side. Also, I have not yet considered the effect of COVID 19 in this Ireland which could be covered in a different answer.

It took him about 1 hour and 10 minutes to write this answer :) So if you find it useful, please vote for it. You will also find other related questions answered by me here Aman Ray

The job prospects of a non-EU student in Ireland after a Masters in Computer Science are a bit challenging than those of an EU candidate.

Most multinational IT companies like Google, IBM, Microsoft, Facebook recruit students regardless of their country of citizenship.

The problem arises if a company pays a non-EU student below € 30,000 per year, which is a minimum threshold set for work visa purposes. Generally, the companies mentioned above pay above the established threshold.

There is still a global demand in the CSE and IT sector, although the gap between supply and demand is gradually closing. Also at eroupe, the CSE and IT sector is listed as a skills shortage, so there is a good chance of get a job in this sector. EU policy mentions that the first preference at work should be given to EROUPIANS over others.

*** Read my answer regarding IRELAND, USA, UK, AUSTRALIA, GERMANY ... etc. You can get detailed information.

You should try Googling the topic, especially the companies in your area of ​​interest. Ask at the Irish Student Union. That's what I would do anyway.

A2A. I had come across this question and was going to answer it anyway, but getting an A2A is exciting.

Ireland is pretty much in the middle of the road when it comes to third tier costs. Unlike many European countries, it is not free, but the costs are not ridiculous like in the United States. The maximum that an institution can charge by law is € 3,000 per year. So for a 3-year course the maximum would be $ 9,000 and for a 4-year course it would be $ 12,000.

These are the costs if you are not eligible for a grant. If you are eligible for a grant then you will not pay half or only have to pay half depending on

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A2A. I had come across this question and was going to answer it anyway, but getting an A2A is exciting.

Ireland is pretty much in the middle of the road when it comes to third tier costs. Unlike many European countries, it is not free, but the costs are not ridiculous like in the United States. The maximum that an institution can charge by law is € 3,000 per year. So for a 3-year course the maximum would be $ 9,000 and for a 4-year course it would be $ 12,000.

These are the costs if you are not eligible for a grant. If you are eligible for a grant, then you will not pay half or only have to pay half depending on the grant you get. You can check your eligibility online at SUSI.ie. This grant is resource tested - how much money you and your family make. Last year the cut-off point was € 52,000. It varies slightly from year to year.

Many people who get the grant also receive money for living expenses and tuition. I know from my cousins ​​that this is just over € 300 a month. Since you asked this anonymously, I can't say what your circumstances may be, but for my cousins ​​who live at home, this € 300 is enough to cover their travel expenses and other essential student expenses like vodka.

If it is not possible for you to commute, such as if you live too far from the university or if you are from a different country, then you will have accommodation costs. This is where the high cost comes into play. On-campus accommodation at Irish colleges and universities is limited and most students live in regular off-campus accommodation.

Now it depends on where you plan to attend college. For example, there is a housing crisis in Dublin and other cities (but to a lesser extent than Dublin) which makes finding accommodation very difficult and makes any available accommodation quite expensive due to high demand. I have known students who have spent months looking for accommodation before finding anything. And they were looking at months and months before the start of the student year.

So it really depends on where you come from and what your needs are. If you are Irish, I recommend commuting to keep costs to a minimum. If you're an American, it's definitely worth studying here, just make sure you start looking for accommodation early. If you are European, it is probably a place similar to your own country or a little more expensive. It really depends on you and why you want to study here. If you're from another place, I don't know. All the Erasmus students I have met here have been Americans or Europeans and I don't know what the costs are like anywhere else.

I came to Ireland as an international student, now I am a resident. It depends a lot on your financial situation. Most students live in overcrowded and overrated residences (there are alternatives depending on how much you can $ pend). Where it is? The minimum wage in Ireland is the highest in the euro zone, which means that things will cost you a little more than in other capitals like Paris (yes, Dublin is more expensive than Paris in general and according to some indexes, it is even more expensive than London, but remember. I'll have more money too). There are always job offers everywhere,

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I came to Ireland as an international student, now I am a resident. It depends a lot on your financial situation. Most students live in overcrowded and overrated residences (there are alternatives depending on how much you can $ pend). Where it is? The minimum wage in Ireland is the highest in the eurozone, which means that things will cost you a little more than in other capitals like Paris (yes, Dublin is more expensive than Paris in general and according to some indexes, it is even more expensive than London, but remember. I'll have more money too). There are always job openings everywhere, there are great apps for that, you can officially work 40 hours only during the summer, but hey, who said babysitting after your part-time job and school will land you in jail? The Irish are very laid back and, for example, they do not usually consider childhood illegal in winter. I was a babysitter for over a year and earned 12.50 an hour and all the children I was looking after were from my neighborhood. One told the other about that responsible Brazilian who lives there and boy, the Irish tend to have more than one child and they are extremely charming and polite. GENERALLY. That is not illegal at all, I was studying, working part-time in the morning in a government. Instance (€ 80 per day) then after school I would take care of the children…. Normally I made around € 150 a day from my two jobs. If you play fair and honest you can win a lot of money, especially if you are South American like me. 50 per hour and all the children I looked after were from my neighborhood. One was telling the other about that responsible Brazilian who lives there and boy, the Irish tend to have more than one child and they are extremely charming and polite. GENERALLY. That is not illegal at all, I was studying, working part-time in the morning in a government. Instance (€ 80 per day) then after school I would take care of the children…. I normally made around € 150 a day from my two jobs. If you play fair and honest you can win a lot of money, especially if you are South American like me. 50 per hour and all the children I looked after were from my neighborhood. One was telling the other about that responsible Brazilian who lives there and boy, the Irish tend to have more than one child and they are extremely charming and polite. GENERALLY. That is not illegal at all, I was studying, working part-time in the morning in a government. Instance (€ 80 per day) then after school I would take care of the children…. I normally made around € 150 a day from my two jobs. If you play fair and honest you can win a lot of money, especially if you are South American like me. working part-time in the morning in a government. Instance (€ 80 per day) then after school I would take care of the children…. I normally made around € 150 a day from my two jobs. If you play fair and honest you can win a lot of money, especially if you are South American like me. working part-time in the morning in a government. Instance (€ 80 per day) then after school I would take care of the children…. I normally made around € 150 a day from my two jobs. If you play fair and honest you can win a lot of money, especially if you are South American like me.

Before 2005, the gap between supply and demand for professionals was much larger than current supply and demand. In fact, there are two reasons to fill this gap, one is the increase in the number of visas (US) and secondly, the demand has also reached a saturation level.
IN USA (Copying my answer): ----
1 ... Getting jobs after graduating from foreign universities is difficult. It depends on the economy and the unemployment rate of the country.
2 ..... If the unemployment rate in the US falls below 9, you will simply be fired from your job.
Most Indian students pursue higher education in the US to obtain a

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Before 2005, the gap between supply and demand for professionals was much larger than current supply and demand. In fact, there are two reasons to fill this gap, one is the increase in the number of visas (US) and secondly, the demand has also reached a saturation level.
IN USA (Copying my answer): ----
1 ... Getting jobs after graduating from foreign universities is difficult. It depends on the economy and the unemployment rate of the country.
2 ..... If the unemployment rate in the US falls below 9, you will simply be fired from your job.
Most Indian students go to higher education in the US to get a job. Although a master's education in the US is the best in the world, it is very expensive. Therefore, most students finance their education through loans. The only way to pay off those huge debts with less difficulty is to work in the United States. However, getting a job in the United States is not easy. First of all, you need to get the H1B work visa. There are many factors that influence the issuance of H1B visas. Not all students who complete their master's degree in the US receive job offers. But if you plan to continue living in the US, Master's degree will help you apply for H1B visa under Master's fee (20,000 visa only).

Most students look for employers to sponsor their H1B visa. But students must remember that this will restrict their options in an environment where it is already difficult to get a job. Also, many of the employers would choose not to deal with the US embassy until they feel that you are particularly worthy of a job. Apart from the large multinationals, there are very few companies that hire foreigners. Getting a job like new in the US is not an easy task.

On-Campus Placements: Most of you may be wondering about on-campus placements. In addition to all the immigration restrictions, the campus placement policy for international students makes it even more difficult to get a job. Most companies only hire US citizens and green card holders.

Optional Practical Training (OPT) - The US government grants only one window period (24 months for STEM) for you to find a job upon completion of your OPT. Since it is difficult to get a job within a certain time frame, most students opt for summer internships. But this is not easy either. It is very important for you to make good contacts and have a network. Unless you have established yourself with some important person in the industry, getting an internship or a job would be a challenge. If you don't get a job within the stipulated deadline, you have no choice but to return to your home country.

Consulting Jobs - Most students end up accepting consulting jobs. What they forget to note is that most of these jobs are contract-based IT jobs. This is definitely not worth all the investment and time spent in a foreign country.

IRELAND (experience of one of my friends): ----
Ireland is voted one of the “friendliest” countries in the world. Good place to study with minimal tuition.

part time job: --- (during study)
Most part time jobs here in Dublin, Ireland require at least ONE YEAR of experience, be it a bartender or a cleaner or a waiter or whatever.
Part time jobs are really hard to come by here in Ireland for students.
Of course, you can get good jobs if you have recommendations and references from your friends who have already worked in that specific job or from someone in the same community.
Ireland is a small country unlike the United States. So the number of part-time jobs is very low.
****. The minimum wage here is € 8.65 per hour and students can legally work up to 20 hours a week and 40 hours a week during holidays.
**** The best part about applying to universities in Ireland is that you do NOT need a GRE score. Almost all major universities and courses do not require a GRE score, unlike the US, where a GRE score is required.
**** The minimum required score on the IELTS is 5, however it is recommended that you score at least 6.5 to be considered for a place at a reputable university.
**** A visa interview is not required.
**** If you are a brilliant student, you can also get a stipend (personal expenses) of € 750.00 per month in addition to any scholarships awarded.
**** The cost of living is too expensive.
JOBS: ---- (after degree)
Ireland is a small country, so opportunities are limited and in limited fields. Finance seems to be working very well. But again, it depends on your ability to network and get the job right too, as some do.
Considering the fact that Ireland is the hub and European headquarters of many IT companies such as Amazon, Vodafone, Apple, Microsoft, Intel and many more large companies, there are many opportunities for people in this stream.
The rest of the streams have very unpredictable labor markets and
preference is ideally given to a national candidate or an EU citizen, over a candidate outside the EEA.

My advice: --- before making any decision, pl. check, current visa policies # current political scene # new amendments # job availability # demand for that issue # future world # scholarships # part-time jobs # immigration rules #etc.

As in any job market, your ability to find a job would depend on your title, work experience, and additional skills that you can offer your prospective employer.
If you present yourself well and have more than the rest of the candidates, you will get the position. If you need a work permit, it is very difficult to get it because the rules are very strict, but if you do not need it, nothing prevents you from entering. The competition is usually fair.
A word of caution though: Ireland is a very 'interesting' place and while all the right noises are being made about equal opportunities and rights, it is

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As in any job market, your ability to find a job would depend on your title, work experience, and additional skills that you can offer your prospective employer.
If you present yourself well and have more than the rest of the candidates, you will get the position. If you need a work permit, it is very difficult to get it because the rules are very strict, but if you do not need it, nothing prevents you from entering. The competition is usually fair.
A word of caution though: Ireland is a very 'interesting' place and while all the right noises are being made about equal opportunities and rights, it is unlikely that you will ever feel at home if it is different from average. Irish person. It's all very subtle, but chances are you work much longer hours for much less pay and don't get support if you ever need it. This is based on my work experience in the local financial services industry. I have also spoken with several expats working in Dublin who seem to have had similar experiences.
If you allow a suggestion, London and the UK in general have a more vibrant and easy-going atmosphere.
society. Again, from personal experience, it is much easier to get in touch with people, they are much more open and friendly. Finding a job in the UK is also likely to be easier simply because the market is bigger.

Santosh. I have voted for two very complete and accurate answers, so you are well informed.

Therefore, I can give you some general advice.

  1. Most of the Irish third tier institutions are honorable, responsive, hardworking and trustworthy, and some of their faculty are leaders in their field.
  2. There has been a huge increase in students studying at the third level in Ireland.
  3. By definition, points and other entry systems suggest that these students have the ability to complete their studies successfully.
  4. Some third tier Irish institutions are increasingly erratic in rating.
  5. This may be due to excessive rapi
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Santosh. I have voted for two very complete and accurate answers, so you are well informed.

Therefore, I can give you some general advice.

  1. Most of the Irish third tier institutions are honorable, responsive, hardworking and trustworthy, and some of their faculty are leaders in their field.
  2. There has been a huge increase in students studying at the third level in Ireland.
  3. By definition, points and other entry systems suggest that these students have the ability to complete their studies successfully.
  4. Some third tier Irish institutions are increasingly erratic in rating.
  5. This may be due to too rapid expansion, too much workload or too much specialization, or that Universities Prime's focus is on publications rather than students or, in a case I'm familiar with, the four.
  6. Third-level marking systems around the world are subjective, not objective.
  7. They follow the spaces assigned in a normal curve instead of the target value of the academic subject of what you will write.
  8. Grading criteria are set to mimic the normal curve, not ability and good academic work.
  9. In English, this means that each year, no more than 5% earn first-class honors. A fixed percentage receives a more average honors grade, a fixed percentage receives a pass, and a fixed percentage does not pass.
  10. They have a word limit and a chapter structure.
  11. Einstein presented his doctoral thesis.
  12. In a page.
  13. You were asked to resubmit it in more detail.
  14. He sent again.
  15. He added "The end".
  16. He accompanied it with a short note saying that his article contained five valuable scientific findings previously unknown to man. Did. Step.
  17. The problem with this academic and elitist nonsense is that classes come to class with different abilities each year.
  18. Please don't upset this elite by appealing to their marks.
  19. Appeals fail. Regardless of the merit.
  20. Before signing up, ask about the failure rate. Ask about the success rate of the failed appeal. Please don't hold your breath.
  21. Above all, ask if resubmission dates are set if items are "failed".
  22. When you enroll, you enroll four other fellow students in a study group.
  23. Select these carefully to cover the five most important topics in your course.
  24. Each task can then be assigned to your subject matter expert, who will produce a one-page summary of the task that covers but does not elaborate on the main points. This saves everyone the time of digging into the boundaries (Google) to identify the elements of the task.
  25. Each subject matter expert produces quarter-page main points of 12 test questions asked in the previous four years.
  26. Teachers, like I used to be, continually complain that it is only possible to ask 12 or 14 questions on a topic and it is possible to cover 10 to 12 of them in the academic time available.
  27. This means that predicting three or four questions this year is easy. The three or four that were requested last year are unlikely to be repeated unless they are central parts of the course.
  28. In fact, many tests repeat two or three questions each year.
  29. There is nothing wrong with this.
  30. There is nothing wrong with this because it must be examined in the central parts of your course.
  31. The first day you sit down in class and your teacher asks "any questions," you ask, "What are the core parts of this course?"
  32. If you have more than one lecturer on a topic, you must identify who projects your lectures the most on the exam.
  33. So, organize your entire class to get the last five-year exams as early as possible in the academic year. These are available online at some institutions.
  34. The main academic requirement is that the work produced is your own work. This is fair. Plagiarism is unfair.
  35. Typically, the testing factories you go to to buy a preliminary job are notoriously of low or no quality and will almost certainly fail you.
  36. Ireland is a good and safe place to live and study and the level of education in Ireland is ranked in the top twenty in the world.
  37. Third-tier institutions typically have college grades between 100 and 500.
  38. Your desperation to climb higher could be at your expense and at the cost of your teachers' high standards.
  39. Your fellow students will be friendly and helpful. There is no competitiveness.
  40. I always kept in mind the difficulties encountered by students whose first language was not English, but I don't know how widespread this is.
  41. I retired from lecturing seven years ago and am not familiar with current policies, if any, to assist those whose first language is not English.
  42. Before enrolling, check the institution's attendance policy if English is not your first language.

It does not work in the same way as in Australia, New Zealand, or Canada. In Ireland, just because you graduated from a university / college in Ireland, you are not eligible for an equivalent of a PR. First, there is no public relations in Ireland. What people consider equivalent is a Stamp4 visa with no work restriction. To be eligible for Stamp4, you must have held a work permit for Ireland (2 years for the critical work permit and 3 or 4 years for the general work permit). Then in the third or fifth year, when you have been on the work permit, you renew your visa and get a stamp4. After a few years on a stamp

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It does not work in the same way as in Australia, New Zealand, or Canada. In Ireland, just because you graduated from a university / college in Ireland, you are not eligible for an equivalent of a PR. First, there is no public relations in Ireland. What people consider equivalent is a Stamp4 visa with no work restriction. To be eligible for Stamp4, you must have held a work permit for Ireland (2 years for the critical work permit and 3 or 4 years for the general work permit). Then in the third or fifth year, when you have been on the work permit, you renew your visa and get a stamp4. After a few years with a stamp4, you can apply for Irish citizenship or get a stamp5 or a longer valid visa.

Simply put, there are no public relations shortcuts in Ireland. Actually, there is no public relations concept in Ireland.

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