What are the highest paying IT jobs in 2020?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Josh Rogers



What are the highest paying IT jobs in 2020?

The knowledge, experience, skills and training of the employee are very influential factors in their salary. The brighter you are, the more they will pay you. If you're looking for the best jobs, salary isn't the only part you need to focus on. Professional growth, satisfaction, respect, etc., are important. Also, different companies have different "higher" salaries. You cannot compare the salary of the chartered accountant in the IT division with that of the chartered accountant in the BFSI domain.

Speaking of the IT field, the past year has been a year of so many improvements. The IT sector is up 8% this year alone, compared to previous years with its revenue rapidly increasing to $ 167 million. So if you are looking for the highest paying jobs around you, this will come in handy. You will go through these graphical representations that include the pay scale, required skills, and top recruiters.

Institute of Higher Education in Bangalore

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As someone with 55 years of experience and having worked at seven different companies, six of them after age 48, I think I have seen it all and been to both ends of the interview table. There are many misconceptions about experienced IT workers, some of which are possibly relevant and some of which are pure myths.

  1. Corporate Culture - It is easier to hire someone newer to the workforce and integrate them into the corporate culture than someone who has been ingrained in a different corporate culture. There are fears, well founded or not, of culture clashes that could undermine the organ.
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As someone with 55 years of experience and having worked at seven different companies, six of them after age 48, I think I have seen it all and been to both ends of the interview table. There are many misconceptions about experienced IT workers, some of which are possibly relevant and some of which are pure myths.

  1. Corporate Culture - It is easier to hire someone newer to the workforce and integrate them into the corporate culture than someone who has been ingrained in a different corporate culture. There are fears, well founded or not, of culture clashes that could undermine the organization.
  2. Promote from within: Anyone who has been "in business" for more than 8 years will likely be in a senior position. Companies are more likely to promote from within, but can conduct interviews for high-level positions to get a benchmark comparison, with no intention of hiring any of the external candidates.
  3. Growth potential: If someone with a lot of experience is applying for an officer position, it is assumed that they have "peaked" in their skill level. There is a perception that they may be slow to learn if they have not advanced.
  4. Current knowledge: People are assumed, rightly or wrongly, not to have expanded their knowledge if they have worked on a system for the last decade or so. If the applicant's experience is in an older system or in a different system, you don't want to spend time and money getting a mid-level employee up to speed on your system, even if the applicant could make significant contributions in other areas.
  5. Older people are slower - Another myth, that older people cannot keep up in a dynamic environment, therefore they are not as productive as younger candidates.
  6. Older people do not take well the direction of younger bosses: another myth that reflects insecurity on the part of the boss. It's not always about you.
  7. Older workers have too high wage demands. We fired Fred last week so we wouldn't have to give him a raise. Why should we hire this guy, with the same experience?
  8. Can we trust someone who would accept a lower salary than at their last job? What is he hiding?
  9. He's overqualified - we can get someone to do the bare minimum for a lot less money.
  10. If he's that good, he'll have my job in a year. No thanks.

In my case, I had a hard time landing that second job after 24 years at the same company, one that made specialty products that were used only in a limited industry. Applying for vacant positions, like you do when leaving school, just didn't work out. What worked was reaching out to the managers of the company to ask them about their needs and find out what was important to them, and to share a little about what motivated me and what I was interested in doing in the next phase of my career. I also went back to school and got another degree, did workshops and seminars, and attended conferences that I could put on my resume. I landed an adjunct teaching position at a night school and used my contacts with former students to introduce myself to their employers. Networking in industry is very helpful. Getting known in the community helps. Recommendations are great - your reputation precedes you. Keeping an eye out for opportunities while you still have a job makes it a bit more desirable than if you lose your job and start looking. If a prospective employer sees you first as an energetic, enthusiastic, and productive partner, rather than a job seeker, it's a lot easier for him to forget all those myths about older workers and make a place for you in their organization.

In the early 2000s, I was called in to screen applicants - in addition to reading their resumes, I also did an internet search, especially among forums and posts where most of us in that field hung out. Surprisingly, very few applicants had any kind of internet presence, which earned them no points. And they did not belong to any professional organization. All of which, to me, meant that even if they kept their heads down, focused on work, they weren't looking around to see what the trends were, what other people were doing, or taking advantage of the benefits of sharing within our specialty. Now, I'm not sure what impression my list of organizations and activities had on employers, since most of them weren't aware of it, but it can't hurt. By the way, we didn't hire any of the group I reviewed.

The 13 highest paid IT jobs in 2020

Tech professionals with the right set of qualifications have many options in today's job market. Whether you are an application architect or a data security analyst, salaries are increasing in many areas of technology due to the strong demand for highly skilled IT specialists.

Here's a look at some of the highest paying IT jobs, according to Robert Half Technology's 2020 Salary Guide:

1. Big data engineer

Companies need people who can transform large amounts of raw data into actionable information for strategy, decision-making.

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The 13 highest paid IT jobs in 2020

Tech professionals with the right set of qualifications have many options in today's job market. Whether you are an application architect or a data security analyst, salaries are increasing in many areas of technology due to the strong demand for highly skilled IT specialists.

Here's a look at some of the highest paying IT jobs, according to Robert Half Technology's 2020 Salary Guide:

1. Big data engineer

Businesses need people who can transform massive amounts of raw data into actionable information for strategy setting, decision-making, and innovation, and who pay well for people with these skills. The midpoint salary (or national median salary) for big data engineers is $ 163,250. These professionals often create the software and hardware architecture of a company, along with the systems that people need to work with the data. Big data engineers typically have a computer science degree and a background in math and databases.

See our big data engineer open jobs.

2. Mobile application developer

Just look at the apps on your phone or tablet and it's pretty easy to find out why mobile app developers are in demand. These IT professionals need experience developing applications for popular platforms, such as iOS and Android. They should also have experience coding with mobile frameworks and mobile development languages, as well as knowledge of web development languages. The midpoint salary for mobile app developers is $ 146,500.

See our open mobile app developer jobs.

3. Information systems security manager

Successful candidates for this hot job possess technical background in systems and network security, but they also have strong interpersonal and leadership skills. Analytical and problem-solving skills are key, as are excellent communication skills. Information systems security managers must also keep up with security trends and government regulations. Employers often request certifications such as Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) or CompTIA Security +. These IT professionals earn a median salary of $ 143,250.

See our open information systems security manager jobs.

4. Application architect

These tech professionals, who earn a median salary of $ 141,750, design the core parts of the applications, including the user interface, middleware, and infrastructure. In addition to strong technical skills, they need to be able to work well in teams and sometimes manage them. Excellent communication and planning skills are required for this job. It is one of the highest paying IT jobs because almost all companies want to improve existing applications or create new ones.

See our open application architect jobs.

5. Data architect

These technology professionals are responsible for the complicated processes essential to making strategic business decisions. They translate business requirements into database solutions and monitor data warehousing (data centers) and how data is organized. Ensuring the security of those databases is also part of the job. The midpoint salary for data architects is $ 141,250.

See our open data architect jobs.

6. Database administrator

Almost every company has some type of database, and these tech professionals maintain and support a company's database environment, helping companies use data more strategically to achieve their goals. . And they get a median salary of $ 133,500 to do it. Database administrators are especially needed in large organizations with large amounts of data to manage and must possess strong leadership and strategic planning skills.

See our open database administrator jobs.

7. Data security analyst

Data security analysts must have a thorough understanding of network and computer security, including firewall management, encryption technologies, and network protocols. The job also requires excellent communication and problem-solving skills and an understanding of trends in safety and government regulations. A professional certification, such as a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) designation, is beneficial. The midpoint salary for data security analysts is $ 129,000.

See our open data security analyst jobs.

8. Software engineer

The national median salary for software engineers is $ 125,750. They design and create engineering specifications for both applications and software, which means they are almost always in demand. Software engineers must have knowledge of information systems and usually a bachelor's degree in computer science or a related area. Specific knowledge of the programming language is required, as well as strong communication skills.

See our open software engineer jobs.

9. Wireless / Cloud Network Engineer

Wireless offices and mobile app development are just some of the reasons these professionals are in demand. Wireless / cloud network engineers must be experts in all aspects of networking technology and have experience in wireless equipment and standards, as well as WLAC design. Analytical and problem-solving skills are necessary for the job, and a certification as a Certified Wireless Network Professional (CWNP) is also valuable. The midpoint salary for wireless network engineers is $ 123,750.

See our open jobs for wireless network engineer / cloud engineer.

10. Data scientist

These IT professionals use their knowledge of statistics and modeling to make sense of complicated data from a variety of sources. To earn a median salary of $ 125,250, data scientists need business knowledge and communication skills, in addition to experience in statistics, mathematics, and computer science. Knowledge of programming languages ​​like Python or Java is often required for the job as well.

See our open data scientist jobs.

11. Senior web developer

They meet business requirements and develop specifications for web-based applications, making web properties appear consistent and attractive. They also provide technical assistance to web administrators and integrate front-end and back-end systems. Senior web developers generally require experience in developing PHP and Ruby on Rails sites and working with a variety of content management systems, as well as experience in front-end development. Senior web developers also need several years of web property management experience. The midpoint salary for senior web developers is $ 123,000.

See our senior web developer open jobs.

12. Site Reliability Engineer

Site reliability engineers monitor application performance and must have in-depth knowledge of the application and code. They can also write code like any software developer, essentially bridging the gap between development and operations in app production, which is why this position is one of the highest paying IT jobs, with a median national salary of $ 122,000. . They often work within technical support teams and help with support tickets or defects, as well as emergency support.

See our open site reliability engineer jobs.

13. Systems Engineer

Systems engineers maintain and support a company's technical infrastructure, including system hardware and software. When a system fails, they will debug and reconfigure that system, if necessary, making knowledge of the development process important to the job as well. Systems engineers must possess strong communication skills to translate technical information to non-technical users. The midpoint salary for systems engineers is $ 106,000.

See our open systems engineer jobs.

These are just a few of the highest paying IT jobs listed in Robert Half Technology's Salary Guide. Download the guide now to see starting salary ranges for 80+ tech jobs

1. Security administrator

As the head of system or network security, you will monitor server activity to make sure everything is running smoothly, as well as install and run support. These administrators often manage large projects and keep the network connection working well and securely. Security administrators are necessary for any major online business and require a lot of experience and good judgment when it comes to system access privileges and capabilities.

2. Programmer

As you probably know, there are all kinds of languages ​​that only a computer can understand. The programmers have a st

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1. Security administrator

As the head of system or network security, you will monitor server activity to make sure everything is running smoothly, as well as install and run support. These administrators often manage large projects and keep the network connection working well and securely. Security administrators are necessary for any major online business and require a lot of experience and good judgment when it comes to system access privileges and capabilities.

2. Programmer

As you probably know, there are all kinds of languages ​​that only a computer can understand. Programmers have a great knowledge of computer languages ​​such as C ++ and Javascript and can write software with them. They often work alongside systems analysts, software engineers, and web developers to create useful programs and video games.

3. Mechanical Engineer

If you are as creative as you are smart, you may want to investigate the field of mechanical engineering. Architects and contractors rely on mechanical engineers to make sure their plans are safe and logical through the use of computer programs. Engineers also maintain technology in a public environment, such as computers at traffic lights or ATMs.

4. Software engineer

Technology is always evolving, so there is a great need for engineers who can help shape it. Software engineers use computer languages ​​to create programs that help consumers stay abreast of the latest developments, trends, and needs. These engineers are responsible for extensive testing of their programs and often rely on user feedback to improve all applications.

5. Web application developer

Ever wonder who made it possible to surf the web? Thanks to web developers, people all over the world have endless sites to browse when accessing the Internet. Developers use complex languages ​​and scripts to create websites and can work independently as freelancers or even help large companies maintain a functional online presence. They often work alongside designers to create the most aesthetically pleasing site possible.

How would a computer science degree limit this? Well, I'll get into that later.

First, let's clarify that we are talking about salary: the regular salary that you receive. I am going to include any aspect of regular pay (such as normal or guaranteed), so regular bonuses and stock options should be included. Bonuses, stock options, retirement plans, etc. are often referred to as deferred compensation (although there are people who argue about including annual bonuses, but the term will serve us well for our purposes).

If I had to get a job in Silicon Valley making, say, $ 120K salary and another $ 40K in deferred compensation

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How would a computer science degree limit this? Well, I'll get into that later.

First, let's clarify that we are talking about salary: the regular salary that you receive. I am going to include any aspect of regular pay (such as normal or guaranteed), so regular bonuses and stock options should be included. Bonuses, stock options, retirement plans, etc. are often referred to as deferred compensation (although there are people who argue about including annual bonuses, but the term will serve us well for our purposes).

If you were to get a job in Silicon Valley with, say, $ 120K in salary and another $ 40K in deferred compensation, you'd be on the higher end of what a recent graduate can earn, and you probably won't see double that. even in 10 years if you stay in software development. A master's degree and a high degree of specialization can add to this, but if you really want better money, you have to dedicate yourself to management. Managers make more money the higher they are on the ladder, all the way to C-level executives.

Are there doctors who earn more than $ 160K? Yes, but not most. The people I know who make the most money on software are not doctors. I know of some doctors who have salaries in excess of $ 200K, but have specific skill sets that are in high demand (such as AI or game visualization). You can earn this amount of money at the academy, but most don't. The highest paid academic position (and generally the highest paid person who is not a coach) is usually a college or university president, and at the best research universities, these salaries reach $ 1 million. A dean can earn $ 500,000. However, most university deans and presidents would laugh at this. Few earn this amount of money. From what i know

These high numbers are not typical salaries. The vast majority of software engineers start out with less than $ 100,000, and even in the middle of their careers, many are not making this amount of money. Part of this is because most people measure primarily by comparing dollar for dollar. You may be more interested in quality of life (QoL) and purchasing power parity (PPP). They are often measured at the national level, but the concepts apply to regions as well.

The highest wages in the field are found in four locations: New York City, the Bay Area, Seattle / Redmond, and Washington, DC. However, these are also the most expensive areas to live in the US The cost of living is very high, but even this is misleading, as house prices are absurdly high and other expenses that are not so absurd. they fail to balance this. When Seattle is the cheapest alternative, something is wrong.

A similar high-end starting salary in St. Louis would be closer to $ 85K salary and $ 15K in deferred compensation. That's about 60% of what that person could earn in Silicon Valley! Except it isn't. In St. Louis, $ 250K will provide you with a nice home in a nice neighborhood or suburb. Having higher income in Missouri is better than California because we have quite regressive taxes (this is not a political statement, it is just a technical term that says that higher income people pay less of their income in taxes, but generally pay more taxes in total dollars). However, the weather is nicer in the Bay Area (seriously, it is much better). That $ 250K mortgage in St. Louis is probably $ 1,600 / month (including insurance and taxes). That will allow you to share an apartment in Mountain View. Maybe.

Okay, now let's talk about actual limits. Jobs that have really high incomes generally have variable bonuses and weird compensation deferral, so the numbers can vary a lot. Yet for several years, many C-level executives earn millions of dollars a year. Wall Street "Financiers" (This is often a fancy term for high-level executives who manage large amounts of money and / or large investment banking operations; used to refer to people who lend money to companies, but now it works very differently) you can make $ 10 million. Or $ 100 million. Or $ 1 million. It depends on your year and your employment contract. A couple of years ago, it was reported that Tim Cook made $ 378 million in 2011, but this was a misunderstanding: that was the total 2011 dollar value of your pay package, assuming it hit all the milestones, and spanned several years. As I understand,

Cook's bachelor's degree was in industrial engineering, not computer science. Most of the top earners have graduate degrees, and Cook has an MBA from Duke. Why would a CS degree keep you out of the best jobs? I know people who have degrees in computer science and now they are business executives, doctors, English teachers, lawyers ... you name it. Investment banking uses high-speed automated trading, and the people who write the algorithms (who usually have a Ph.D.) and who implement the software (who usually have an MS) make a lot of money (certainly up to $ 1 million, including bonuses. ), and I was once interviewed by a computer science teacher at one of the best schools who had retired for a few years to help start a hedge fund, So while it's not necessarily normal in investment banking culture, you can clearly climb high on that (or any other). ) industry with a degree in computer science.

Of course, none of these people are among the richest in the world; that is generally the product of a successful venture. This is how Gates, Ellison, Jobs, etc., made their money. No really smart person works for a living;). Seriously, most entrepreneurs leave after spending almost everything they had and have nothing to show for it. High risk, high reward (potential).

Here's a counter question: how much money do you need? There is no correct answer, but be careful: if your answer is "How much can I earn!" and he's trying to keep up with the Joneses, he's never going to win as much as someone else. Someone you know personally will earn you more money.

Good luck!

These are some jobs that became extinct during the 20th and 21st centuries.

1. Bowling pin setter

Image credits: shorpy.com

Bowling alley setters were young boys employed in bowling alleys to prepare pins for customers. (Image credits: wikimedia.org)

2. Human alarm clock

Image credits: laboiteverte.fr

Image credits: imgur.com

The callers were essentially alarm clocks - they were hired to ensure that people woke up on time for their own jobs. They used sticks, sticks, or pebbles to hit customers' windows and doors. (Image credits: laboiteverte.fr)

3. Ice cutter

Image credits: sharen

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These are some jobs that became extinct during the 20th and 21st centuries.

1. Bowling pin setter

Image credits: shorpy.com

Bowling alley setters were young boys employed in bowling alleys to prepare pins for customers. (Image credits: wikimedia.org)

2. Human alarm clock

Image credits: laboiteverte.fr

Image credits: imgur.com

The callers were essentially alarm clocks - they were hired to ensure that people woke up on time for their own jobs. They used sticks, sticks, or pebbles to hit customers' windows and doors. (Image credits: laboiteverte.fr)

3. Ice cutter

Image credits: sharenator.com

Before modern refrigeration techniques became mainstream, ice cutters cut ice in frozen lakes for people to use in their cellars and coolers. It was dangerous work that was often done under extreme conditions. (Image credits: sharenator.com)

4. Pre-radar listener for enemy aircraft

Image credits: retronaut.com

Before radar, troops used acoustic mirrors and listening devices like these to focus and detect the sound of approaching aircraft engines. (Image credits: retronaut.com)

5. Rat catcher

Image credits: retronaut.com

Image credits: retronaut.com

Rat catchers were used in Europe to control rat populations. They were at high risk for discomfort and infection, but they helped prevent them from spreading to the public. (Image credits: Michael von Graffenried)

6. Lamplighter

Image Credits: lamplighterswooster.com

Lanterns used long poles to turn on, turn off, and refuel streetlights, until electric lamps were introduced. (Image credits: blogs.democratandchronicle.com)

7. Registry Controller

Before the technology or infrastructure was available to transport logs by truck, log drivers would float and guide them downstream from logging sites to processing areas. (Image credits: wikipedia.org)

8. Switchboard operator

Image credits: wikipedia.org

Switchboard operators were an integral part of the operation of a telephone network before modern technology rendered them obsolete. They would connect long distance calls and do other things that are now done digitally. (Image credits: wikipedia.org)

9. Resurrectionist

Resurrectionists, or "body thieves," were hired in the 19th century to remove corpses from graves for universities to use as corpses. Corpses from legal means were rare and difficult to obtain, so universities had to resort to other means to obtain corpses for their students. (Image credits: paul-barford.blogspot.com)

10. Reader who entertained factory workers

Image credits: thecigarmaker.net

Generally speaking, a reader is simply someone who reads. However, they were often hired with pooled money from workers to read in large rooms full of manual laborers to keep them entertained. Some read union or left-wing publications to workers. (Image credits: cultura.elpais.com)

The following jobs will be extinguished in the next 10 to 20 years (some of them partially).

Let's take a quick look to see if your work is on the endangered species list.

1. Drivers

The world will always have some kind of driver, and we'll probably still be driving 10 years from now. But the writing is on the wall (The rise of automated cars will wipe out thousands of jobs beyond driving), and a lot of resources are being devoted to handing the wheel over to automation. Self-driving cars are just a few years away, and when the change happens, it won't just be our personal vehicles that will be autonomous. It's Uber vehicles, long-haul 18-wheelers, public buses, everything, really.

2. Farmers

Food at a farmers market | Stock images, photos, illustrations and videos - iStock

Not all farmers will disappear in 10 years, but as we have seen over the last two generations, their role will diminish. At one time, most Americans were farmers. Now, there are only 2 million (http://www.fb.org/newsroom/fastfacts/) in the entire country. And it is a field that is shrinking. Technology is making it easier for fewer people to produce more yields, and indoor farms and even lab-grown meats are likely to start to gain popularity. The new group of farmers might resemble scientists and biologists more than anything.

3. Postal workers

The number of postal workers is declining and there are many reasons for this. Private companies like UPS and FedEx are taking over some of the load. But like many other entries on this list, technology is the main culprit. Postmen can't deliver email to you, after all, and as mail system installations become more automated and technologically capable, fewer people will be needed to run them. Postal workers have been rated America's fastest disappearing job (10 rapidly disappearing jobs. Got one?)

.

4. Announcers

In an age when Edward R. Murrow and Walter Cronkite have been replaced by Wolf Blitzer and Brian Williams, many people have already labeled television journalism dead. Of course, this is another industry that will not completely disappear. But it is shrinking, which means that the few positions that exist will become even more competitive. And generally speaking, broadcast reporting is hard work that pays relatively little and requires long hours.

5. Jewelers

What can be blamed for the contraction of the American jewelry industry? Above all, it is due to globalization. There will always be local jewelers, but most jewelry manufacturing has moved overseas to contain costs. According to the statistics bureau, there aren't even that many jewelers left in the US, about 40,000 in 2014. And that number will drop 11% by 2024.

6. Fishermen

A fisherman falls apart. | Stock images, photos, illustrations and videos - iStock

Professional fishermen face threats to their work on all fronts. Technology is clearly improving, which means fewer people are required to run an operation. But imports of seafood from farms are becoming more popular and cheaper. You also have to take into account the issue of overfishing and the fact that climate change (How climate change and the water crisis could dry up your career) is having a huge effect on marine life and available fish stocks.

7. Printers and editors

Publishing and printing, at least in the old sense, is an endangered industry. Technology has brought it to the digital realm, and we have seen the consequences in the decline in the number of newspaper readers and the increase in e-books. We will always publish books and magazines, but people who have been trained in the old ways of producing them will probably be out of work in the near future.

8. Cashiers

For anyone who has been to a grocery store or a large supermarket chain, it is clear that the days of the cashier are numbered. ATMs, like many others, are slowly but surely being replaced by self-checkout kiosks. Amazon is taking this one step further by experimenting with stores that have no checkout lines at all (Amazon.com: Amazon Go). Most ATMs will take more than a decade to disappear, but they are on the list.

9. Delivery

We have already included jobs, such as drivers and postal workers. Both jobs are aimed at one main function: delivering things. But we think adding "delivery" as its own category is justified. Millions of people deliver things professionally, whether it's pizzas, newspapers, or even people. And once again, the clock ticks on these jobs, potentially leaving tens of millions out of work.

10. Travel agents

If you're a fan of sites like Kayak, Priceline, or Hotwire, you're slowly killing off a long-established industry: travel agencies. Depending on how old you are, it is very possible that you have never turned to a travel agent. But at one point, these people were indispensable. These days, you can easily find a flight, a hotel, and a car from your phone, which is the main reason these jobs are headed for extinction.

11. Dispatchers

We talk about drivers and delivery, but what about the people telling those people where to go? They are in trouble too. We traditionally call these people dispatchers and their jobs are in grave jeopardy. The main reason is due to automation, like many other jobs in danger. Computers can route resources where they are needed as well as (if not better) than any human.

12. Telephone sellers

There was a time when he didn't want to answer his phone because he thought he might be a telemarketer. They still exist, but few of them are real flesh and blood humans. You may be familiar with robocalls. These days these calling bots are replacing telemarketers. They'll be able to make more calls in less time, all while eliminating the need for employers to pay people to do so.

13. Social media professionals

Social media has found its way into all facets of our lives. Think of it this way: If it happened and you didn't post it on Instagram, did it happen at all? With the advent of social media have come the social media experts and administrators. These jobs could exist in the future in some form. But social media is going nowhere, and it could be akin to being a "TV expert" or something similar for years to come. As the LottoLand report says, the skills associated with these jobs will be more common than specialized.

14. Manufacturing industry workers (this is a bit far in the future, but worth talking about)

Workers of a production plant | Volvo

We are seeing a decline in manufacturing at a rapid rate. It has also been going on for a while. This is one of the biggest problems facing the American economy. We just don't have or need armies of manufacturing workers like we used to. Factories have been automated and many other manufacturing jobs have moved to countries where labor is cheaper. These jobs will not return and, in all likelihood, will continue to disappear.

15. Sports officials and referees

We previously wrote (5 jobs we should happily hand over to robots) that the sports referee job would be more suitable for a robot or artificial intelligence. People make mistakes, after all, so why not put a robot in charge? Also, who are you going to argue with when you feel like the robot has made a bad decision? They are all sensors and circuits and it is not influenced by the crowd, opposing players or coaches. It's hard to say if we'll see a robot umpire anytime soon, but don't be surprised when Wall-E is throwing flags at the Super Bowl.

Voila - Now you know what are some of the jobs that are and will be extinct in the near future.

High paying jobs are too many. To find the best ones, it must be in accordance with your interests, skills, competence, and job requirements of a given employer. Here are some of the following:

  • Petroleum Engineer - Starting salary is $ 93,000. They are tasked with designing and developing procedures for the extraction of gas from its reservoirs that lie below the earth's surface. Regarding your degrees, you must have aptitude for mathematics and science, among other requirements.
  • Aerospace Engineer - An aerospace engineer earns an average salary of $ 59,400. Your main responsibility is to design new
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High paying jobs are too many. To find the best ones, it must be in accordance with your interests, skills, competence, and job requirements of a given employer. Here are some of the following:

  • Petroleum Engineer - Starting salary is $ 93,000. They are tasked with designing and developing procedures for the extraction of gas from its reservoirs that lie below the earth's surface. Regarding your degrees, you must have aptitude for mathematics and science, among other requirements.
  • Aerospace Engineer - An aerospace engineer earns an average salary of $ 59,400. His main responsibility is to design new technologies for defense systems, aviation and space exploration, as well as missile development.
  • Nuclear Engineer: Nuclear engineers possess creativity, precision, logic, and are lovers of numbers. The job description involves creative power plant design. When it comes to salary, the base salary for a nuclear engineer ranges from $ 63,900 and up, depending on several factors.
  • Applied Mathematician: The meridian salary for this profession is $ 56,400, but it can go up to $ 101,000. The primary responsibility of these highly trained professionals is to provide solutions to practical numerical problems.
  • Computer Hardware Engineer - They modify computers for various functions. The base salary for a computer engineer ranges from $ 58,000.

The jobs mentioned above allow you to enjoy the life of a jet-set without any complexity.

Engineering is one of the most important and sought after professions today. An additional specialization in some of the latest technologies, such as artificial intelligence, blockchain, machine learning, and IoT, will further enhance the job prospects for students. In an era where students are witnessing fierce competition in the industry, only those educational institutions that provide a curriculum focused on solving the persistent challenges of the 21st century will prosper and be able to provide lucrative placements for their students. Students must possess all the skills that will make them

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Engineering is one of the most important and sought after professions today. An additional specialization in some of the latest technologies, such as artificial intelligence, blockchain, machine learning, and IoT, will further enhance the job prospects for students. In an era where students are witnessing fierce competition in the industry, only those educational institutions that provide a curriculum focused on solving the persistent challenges of the 21st century will prosper and be able to provide lucrative placements for their students. Students must possess all the skills that will prepare them for the future.

One of the educational institutions that offers this type of upgrade on its regular B. Tech. The course is the University of Petroleum and Energy Studies (UPES). They call it 'Engineering Plus' and it helps students arm themselves with future-ready skills that not only improve their employability prospects, but also give them the opportunity to develop their business acumen with a diploma in business administration. It is a great strategy to get future engineers to fit the requirements of the industry. Today, more than ever, the world needs qualified engineers who are fully prepared to solve complex problems in a multicultural context. Only when they meet these requirements will they be able to obtain attractive salary packages.

  1. Chief Financial Officer - £ 112,666
  2. Vice President of Sales: £ 109,278
  3. Vice President of Engineering - £ 108,623
  4. Orthodontist - £ 99,010
  5. Dermatologist - £ 93,282
  6. Director of Product Management - £ 92,692
  7. Neonatologist - £ 92,003
  8. Rheumatologist - £ 91,724
  9. Ophthalmologist - £ 91,704
  10. Catering Director - £ 91,578
  11. Nephrologist - £ 91,521
  12. Plastic Surgeon - £ 90,922
  13. Senior Director - £ 90,059
  14. Pediatrician - £ 89,723
  15. Anesthesiologist - £ 89,501
  16. Managing Director - £ 88,101
  17. Unit Manager - £ 86,727
  18. Vice President of Finance - £ 86,517
  19. Tax Director - £ 85,742
  20. Construction Director - £ 85,148

If someone could really answer that question accurately, they probably wouldn't share the information.

The demand for a good or service can change if those goods or services become obsolete due to new goods or new services that do not yet exist.

There are likely to be people who prefer what they are used to achieving by focusing on getting those people to buy your product or service.

While others will opt for the newer product or service that they once paid you or the company you work for to provide in exchange for a profit for you if you are self-employed or your business, so the

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If someone could really answer that question accurately, they probably wouldn't share the information.

The demand for a good or service can change if those goods or services become obsolete due to new goods or new services that do not yet exist.

There are likely to be people who prefer what they are used to achieving by focusing on getting those people to buy your product or service.

While others will opt for the newer product or service that they where once paying you or the company you work for to provide in exchange for a profit for you if you are self employed or your company so they can continue to pay you for the part you play in providing the product or service they are selling.

CIO,CTO,CDO, CDS, any other C level roles. More normal level jobs, I’d say very strong developers, data scientists, solution architects in consulting, and any managers in IT consulting do very well.

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