What are the highest paying financial jobs at Goldman Sachs?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Jacob Burton



What are the highest paying financial jobs at Goldman Sachs?

Goldman Sachs (GS) has always paid its employees well and they are paid better.

The average Goldman Sachs employee earns $ 367,564 a year, according to the company's most recent financial disclosures. It's actually a bit lower than last quarter, but a notable increase from the year before, when the average compensation per employee was $ 254,850.

Investment banking salaries are highly dependent on performance and experience, and bankers are higher up the ranks, earning more than those early in their careers. While analysts can make about $ 110,000 per year at investment banks, CEOs make much more, up to $ 20 million or more.

Source: Investopedia

I will be short and sweet.

My position: Managing Director Partner

Time served: I've been with Goldman for 17 years. I have been a partner for eight years.

Compensation: I've seen the good times and the bad. I used to take home a lot more money, but now I make 5-6 million dollars annually (including bonus), not a small amount of change, but when the market was roaring before the mortgage crisis, the take-home pay was much older.

My hours: I work about 55 hours a week. I have many others to do my hard work.

What I do? Ensuring that my unit continues to generate income for the company.

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I will be short and sweet.

My position: Managing Director Partner

Time served: I've been with Goldman for 17 years. I have been a partner for eight years.

Compensation: I've seen the good times and the bad. I used to take home a lot more money, but now I make 5-6 million dollars annually (including bonus), not a small amount of change, but when the market was roaring before the mortgage crisis, the take-home pay was much older.

My hours: I work about 55 hours a week. I have many others to do my hard work.

What I do? Make sure my unit continues to generate income for the business. I travel to find new businesses, work with my contacts, etc.

My life: I have a wife, two kids, I live in Greenwich, I have a couple of cars and bells and whistles.

Stress: stress is incredible. Money is great, but the mental and physical toll it takes on your body over the years is not (weight gain, gray hair, not being able to watch all my kids' soccer games, going to recitals, less time with the family, discussions at home, etc)

11/21/12 Edits below: Let me address some of the comments. I'm used to being in the hot seat, so people who want to criticize me for working at GS don't cut me off. I have contributed my experience and how I conduct myself. GS helps many companies (public and private), clients and countries in many facets, but that was not the point.

As for my hours, I currently work 55 hours a week. As he rose through the ranks, the norm was 60 to 80 hours a week.

Why am I still doing it? What keeps me motivated? I'm very good at what I do, at people, and I enjoy it. The people I work with keep me motivated. Without them I am nothing and daily they teach me new things for which I am grateful. I empower them to make decisions, lead by example, and surround them with people who don't adhere to the status quo.

I am preparing many of them to be leaders, whether in this organization or elsewhere, and I want them to surpass what I have done. It is exciting for me to watch them grow as many have been with me for several years.

Why am I not retiring? So can I stay home and argue with my wife? ... (sarcasm).

What will I do once I leave GS? Now I do philanthropic work, so when I leave the world of finance for good, I will spend all my time helping some non-profit organizations.

11/22/12 Edit: Chris Burkhard writing from his ass. We don't magically earn the 7-8 figure salaries that we put into our dues. What I do is not rocket science, but it requires skill, business acumen, and pedigree. Employees are educated, taught, mentored as they rise through the ranks.

Below is a rough rating system, there may be some nuances:

Analyst: canyon bottom. Must dedicate 3-4 years to move to next
Associate level - Must invest 3 years and typically have MBA
VP- Variable
SVP-Variable
Director-Variable
Managing Director-Variable
Partner (Managing Director Partner) - Cream of the Crop .

He asked himself the question: Would he continue to bank if he had to do it all over again?
I would still be banking if I had to do it all over again, but I wouldn't be staying as long as I have in space.

In general, banks use titles like "Vice President" very differently than companies do. In corporations, "vice president" often denotes one of the highest roles in the company; an individual in charge of major operating units with responsibility for delivering a large portion of the company's revenue.

In banks, "vice president" is a much less exclusive and lower-ranking designation. At Goldman Sachs, which is a relatively non-hierarchical place, there aren't many titles. The progression is:

Analyst, Associate, Vice President, General Director.

Internally, there is an end, more seni

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In general, banks use titles like "Vice President" very differently than companies do. In corporations, "vice president" often denotes one of the highest roles in the company; an individual in charge of major operating units with responsibility for delivering a large portion of the company's revenue.

In banks, "vice president" is a much less exclusive and lower-ranking designation. At Goldman Sachs, which is a relatively non-hierarchical place, there aren't many titles. The progression is:

Analyst, Associate, Vice President, General Director.

Internally, there is a final, more senior, partner designation, but partners are known outside of the company only as managing directors (as are non-partner managing directors). Yes, it is a bit confusing.

Vice President (VP) is therefore one of the most versatile appointments within the firm. Employees with a strong performance record are typically eligible for promotion to vice president at approximately 5-6 years of careers. Each division of the firm runs its own selection process for vice president promotions. In some cases (generally in revenue-generating divisions) it is substantially based on time and tenure. In other divisions, the criteria may be a bit stricter.

In any case, a big part of the reason Goldman, specifically, has such a large number of vice presidents is that the next title is Managing Director. The criteria and selection process for the promotion of CEO are considerably more stringent and take into account not only the performance and track record of the candidate, but also the scope and impact of their role, etc. Candidates for the CEO promotion typically have responsibility for top global functions, or for a significant contribution to revenue. This means that the ranks of vice presidents range from relatively young employees of 26 or 27 years of age to those on the cusp of promoting MD, whose role and responsibilities are very considerable as described above.

Goldman is unusual in that most similar organizations have an additional degree level between VP and MD (usually 'Director' or similar). Surprisingly, prior to 1998, when Goldman first introduced the non-partner Managing Director designation, the only level above VP was Partner, which really expanded the VP population. (That said, the company was substantially smaller at the time in terms of overall headcount.)

The 1999 Goldman IPO

Being 'willing to move up' can be a stressful state for those involved. But consider how much I depended on this for a small group of senior vice presidents in 1998. I was there at the time, even though I was only out of college for a couple of years, so I was certainly just a bystander. But in 1997 or early 1998, partners at Goldman Sachs, at the time the last major private association on Wall Street, had chosen to take the company public. The plans progressed smoothly (after all, Goldman helps companies go public for a living) until the fall of 1998. At that time, the continuing effects of the 1997 Asian financial crisis and the Russian financial crisis of 1998 contributed to the failure of a major hedge fund. , Long Term Capital Management, which required a rescue from a bank consortium to contain more widespread consequences. However, this rocked the markets and caused equity values ​​to plummet. In this context, the Goldman partnership determined that conditions were not favorable for a successful IPO and delayed the offering until spring 1999.

Fast forward a few weeks from the LTCM crisis to the Goldman Sachs partner selection process of 1998, which occurred, then, as now, every two years. At the time, the 'Managing Director' designation was very new and consequently there were not that many yet. Today, it is extremely rare (though not yet impossible) to jump directly from VP to partner, but until the late 90's that was the only possible jump, as there was no other title between VP and partner.

Then, when entering the selection of partners in 1998, a group of aspiring vice-presidents knew that they faced 3 possible results of the nomination process: 1) being named partner; 2) be appointed managing director (not partner); or 3) not get a promotion and remain vice president.

Now, the stakes are high in a partnership promotion at any time, but in 1998 the question of whether or not you got the go-ahead to become a partner meant that you were going to be a partner when the company went public in the spring of 1999. or you ... you weren't there. And that was going to make a difference of tens of millions of dollars to you. In the long run, possibly even more.

Not long after that, I got to know some members of that 1998 class of partners quite well. They were great leaders, outstanding bearers of culture, and, in my opinion, great people and role models.

Vice Presidents and Executive Directors

Finally, there is an equivalent designation that the company uses outside of the United States. In many other regions where the company operates, the designation of "vice president" is foreign to local business culture and is therefore not widely recognized or understood. For this reason, when the company expanded outside the United States 25-30 years ago, it introduced the title of "Chief Executive Officer" to be exactly equivalent to the Vice President label used in the United States.

At various points in my time at the firm, I carried business cards that said "Vice President" and business cards that said "CEO." Personally I have always preferred the latter. But then again I'm British so I guess it makes sense.

I never worked at Goldman, but having worked at a bank, I can tell you that, like all other banks, Goldman will try to position the company to capture the most money.

I will define "enrichment" as the division that will generate the most money ... and that is like trying to predict the future.

Let me explain:

  • During the 1980s, with the advent of the junk bond market, the areas that generated the most money were related to that. Companies were merged and eliminated using these instruments as financing. So the people who structured, sold, and traded these instruments
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I never worked at Goldman, but having worked at a bank, I can tell you that, like all other banks, Goldman will try to position the company to capture the most money.

I will define "enrichment" as the division that will generate the most money ... and that is like trying to predict the future.

Let me explain:

  • During the 1980s, with the advent of the junk bond market, the areas that generated the most money were related to that. Companies were merged and eliminated using these instruments as financing. So the people who structured, sold, and traded these instruments made the most money.
  • When that market died and there were many defaults, money began to flow back to the equity markets. People in the stock markets made more money compared to everyone else.
  • The late 1990s and early 2000s is when stock markets exploded with the advent of the Internet and technology companies. Anyone who worked in equities and technology made a fortune.
  • After technology exploded along with the introduction of automation in stocks, eliminating brokers and traders, stocks as a real money generating business slowed dramatically.
  • Then the money flowed into fixed income, commodities, and real estate. The Fed cut rates and these asset classes took off.

The point is, just by looking at this timeline you can see that the asset classes that took off were the sectors that had the most money flowing into them. The old saying applies here "A high tide lifts all ships here."

Find out where the money is going to flow and position yourself accordingly. These are my thoughts if I were to bet on the direction of the market:

  • A liquidation in the high-grade, high-yield markets. A specialist who knows how to restructure debt will be required.
  • At some point the student loan market will be addressed. Experts in this field and people who know how to tackle some of the pressing issues will be needed.
  • The subprime car market will also be crushed. Experts who can offer solutions will be in high demand.
  • A specialist in the oil and gas markets who knows how to value and sell these assets will be in demand.
  • Blockchain technology will be increasingly used in trade settlement. Specialists who know how to manipulate this software and apply it in the markets will do well here.
  • The demand for healthcare and on-demand medical services is poised for real reforms and should perform well for years to come.
  • Bond trading will need to be tackled once again by offering huge opportunities. Banks can no longer hold positions of decorum. At some point, new entities will once again play the role of intermediaries.

Goldman Sachs will do well in any market, but the key to making real money is figuring out where the real money flows are going.

There are several, but the most obvious are:
-they are still willing to take risks that other banks are no longer, despite the regulatory environment (for example, they have not withdrawn from commodities)
-the opposite of the above is that they were and they are much more disciplined about sourcing and allocating capital: the company's mantra is to "borrow more than you need for longer than you need," which enabled them to weather the crisis better than most, be opportunistic at that time and most importantly the higher cost of capital imposed the discipline of allocating for higher returns
- the revolving door of Goldma

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There are several, but the most obvious are:
-they are still willing to take risks that other banks are no longer, despite the regulatory environment (for example, they have not withdrawn from commodities)
-the opposite of the above is that they were and they are much more disciplined about sourcing and allocating capital: the company's mantra is to "borrow more than you need for longer than you need," which enabled them to weather the crisis better than most, be opportunistic at that time and most importantly the higher cost of capital enforced the discipline of allocating to obtain higher returns
-Goldman's revolving door and public service provide them with an alumni network unsurpassed in navigating the political landscape, which is not to say that alumni always favor them (e.g. Gary Gensler tried to be a CFTC director much tougher than the banks or the Republicans wanted it to be)
-GS people, even tradesmen, exude a quiet arrogance- ostentation is frowned upon, not only for public relations reasons, but also because most top management feels like you know you are the best, you don't have to to show it; Also, GS doesn't really want solo stars, and if you get too caught up in your own hype, they assume, because they get to choose from their hires, that you're replaceable; very few can be bigger than the company.
-the atmosphere is oppressive if you don't fit the mold; most of us who were there for acquisition never fit in well
-Goldman, unlike other banks, actually believes that it is a technology leader and that IT IS a core competence, rather than a business enabler; The reality I saw was very different, and their technological organization was as dysfunctional in many respects as that of other banks I have dealt with; I think it's partly due to the fact that technologists are on standby motivated by money rather than solving difficult problems, and the best money for technologists is working as quantitative strategists ("strategies") at the trading tables, in instead of building infrastructure.

Hey!

Government jobs generally bring you a fair amount of entry-level income as newer, around ₹ 20,000 when starting for clerk-level jobs and ₹ 30,000 when starting for officer-level jobs, but most jobs include an even higher level of income, such as: -

IFS

Indian foreign service officers are selected through civil service examinations conducted by the UPSC.

  • The starting salary is between $ 4,000 and $ 5,500.
  • They get wonderful accommodation in the best cities in the world.
  • Free education in international schools for your children.
  • Official luxury car
  • Maid
  • Free medical care
  • Free air tickets to travel to India

IPS / IAS

IAS and

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Hey!

Government jobs generally bring you a fair amount of entry-level income as newer, around ₹ 20,000 when starting for clerk-level jobs and ₹ 30,000 when starting for officer-level jobs, but most jobs include an even higher level of income, such as: -

IFS

Indian foreign service officers are selected through civil service examinations conducted by the UPSC.

  • The starting salary is between $ 4,000 and $ 5,500.
  • They get wonderful accommodation in the best cities in the world.
  • Free education in international schools for your children.
  • Official luxury car
  • Maid
  • Free medical care
  • Free air tickets to travel to India

IPS / IAS

IAS and IPS are the most requested government positions in our country. They work in different and diverse fields in parts of the country.

  • Entry level pay of almost Rs. 50,000 together with DA.
  • Large bungalows as houses in posh localities when posted as DM.
  • Official vehicle and driver.
  • In some states, security guards are also provided.
  • They get subsidized electricity.
  • They can obtain study permits for higher education in foreign universities with the sponsorship of the government.

Defense services

Defense services officials receive more salaries and benefits than their civilian counterparts. These jobs involve risk and adventure.

  • Entry-level salary in the rank of Lieutenant- Rs. 50,000-60,000 + DA
  • Good accommodation.
  • Uniform allowance
  • Free ration
  • Maintenance allowance
  • High Altitude Allowance
  • Transport allowance
  • Children's education grant
  • Pension after retirement

RBI GRADE B

When it comes to banking, none is a better employer than RBI. RBI Grade B is the best position to start a banking career.

  • Entry level salary: Rs. 67,000 (approx.) + DA
  • A 3 BHK condo in posh locations.
  • 180 liters of gasoline / year
  • Children's education grant
  • Every two years; Rs. 1 lakh allowance for excursions

Many other benefits such as Housekeeping Allowance, Newspaper Allowance, Laptop Allowance, Study License, etc. make RBI the best organization to work for.

Power supply

Engineers who do not like the corporate lifestyle often choose public sector companies. The most preferred way to get a job in power supply units is through GATE.

  • Salary available excluding all allowances - Rs. 52,000 (approx.) + DA
  • Company accommodation or HRA
  • Shift allowance (increases salary by Rs. 3000-4000)
  • Special compensation for plant-based location

Other subsidies include house maintenance, transportation subsidy, subsidized dining room, furniture subsidy, laptop subsidy, etc.

INDIAN FOREST SERVICES

Indian Forest service is the best job for those who want to escape city life, prefer to live in the lap of nature and enjoy pristine surroundings. Officers are supposed to work in the field of forestry and wildlife.

  • The entry level salary is Rs. 52,000 (approx.) + DA
  • Large well furnished home
  • An official vehicle and driver.
  • A house helper
  • Subsidized electricity

STATE SERVICE COMMISSION

Like UPSC it conducts examinations for Grade A positions: All Indian Services and Central Government Department. Similarly, each state conducts examinations for positions like SDM (Subdivisional Magistrate), DSP (Deputy Superintendent of Police), ETO (Excise and Tax Officer), Tehsildar, etc.

Salary in all states varies, but on average, your salary is between Rs. 35,000- 45,000. They are also given the rest of the incentives such as furnished house, official vehicle, driver, electricity subsidy, etc.

ASO IN THE MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

ASO in MEA is a B grade publication, and selection for this publication is made through the SSC CGL exam. The biggest incentive to work at MEA is overseas positions. For positions abroad, it is mandatory to pass the foreign language proficiency test. Salary and incentives

  • When abroad, the salary varies between Rs. 1.25- 1.8 lakhs
  • Government provided accommodation

THANK YOU for reading 🤟

I hope you have understood

Hello there,

There is no doubt that everyone knows that entering a prestigious firm like Goldman Sachs is very difficult and why it should not be. You get to work on some of the most interesting things in the world, you can walk to fame in those sparkling glass offices and enjoy the night breeze on Wall Street.

And statistics are also plentiful on the web about what the average is. success rate in entering GS and other similar companies.

But I would like to highlight a few points here that I have seen with people in my circle associated with GS in full-time roles.

First of all, you need to decide what role or team one is like.

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Hello there,

There is no doubt that everyone knows that entering a prestigious firm like Goldman Sachs is very difficult and why it should not be. You get to work on some of the most interesting things in the world, you can walk to fame in those sparkling glass offices and enjoy the night breeze on Wall Street.

And statistics are also plentiful on the web about what the average is. success rate in entering GS and other similar companies.

But I would like to highlight a few points here that I have seen with people in my circle associated with GS in full-time roles.

First, one must decide what role or team to aspire to when joining Goldman. GS is simply not about investment banking and investment bankers do not trade on the floor as seen in the movies. There are many roles available within GS and one needs to understand what you want and where it fits in well. Some of the roles that I know of are:

  • Investment banking analyst
  • Negotiation at the main office
  • Equity analysis
  • Digital and IT

Let me tell you that each of them is equally difficult and you need to be on top of your game to pass. Having said that there are routes that are mainly mentioned below that people follow to enter GS, namely,

  • Placements on campus
  • References
  • Impress someone online or in real life you meet at GS with your achievements
  • Enter GS working for a vendor for which GS is a customer (fairly common in IT and consulting roles)

Now I would not go into the details of how the areas mentioned above work, but I would like to bring some important tips here related to work culture and its importance in passing GS interviews.

Let me tell you with 100% confidence that cultural fit is something Goldman is always looking for. I know people who gave 10 interviews and criticized them all with bright smiles on technicalities, but failed in the last round because they didn't fit the culture. And this makes sense and it also makes GS a hit because not everyone is a suitable culture for Goldman.

It is not a 9 to 5 job, it is not a job where you just have to work day after day and you do not care about people or what they care about, it is not a job where your weekends are always predictable. With all these points in mind, it is essential to understand whether one is the right fit or not. Because if you don't, no matter what, you won't get the offer and this could result in disappointments that essentially mean nothing. Rejection is a vain depression metric.

So for more luck in going through GS, keep up with what it does, get to know the industry, and most of all, get to know the culture of the company. Culture is often interpreted as a very broad term, so it would help you a bit here.

Check out WrkVibe once to get a feel for what the different culture metrics look like at Goldman Sachs and see where you can improve and if it's something you really want.

It may not be that difficult then, hope this helps!

There are several reasons, but the ones at the top of the list probably include:

  1. There is light at the end of the tunnel. The Analyst Program is a 2-3 year program, after which you are expected to go ahead and get another job or apply to business school. When you know there is an end in sight, it is easier to suffer the time you have left.
  2. Nobody wants to quit smoking. Most of these analysts are incredibly motivated Type A personalities with a proven track record of excellence in almost everything they do. They beat out hundreds of other candidates for the position and
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There are several reasons, but the ones at the top of the list probably include:

  1. There is light at the end of the tunnel. The Analyst Program is a 2-3 year program, after which you are expected to go ahead and get another job or apply to business school. When you know there is an end in sight, it is easier to suffer the time you have left.
  2. Nobody wants to quit smoking. Most of these analysts are incredibly motivated Type A personalities with a proven track record of excellence in almost everything they do. They beat out hundreds of other candidates for the job, and are some of the people least likely to quit early and walk away from something they committed to doing.
  3. The compensation is good. There is not much more to say about this. Given how hard he works and how little life he has outside of work, he ends up taking a good chunk of that salary. You don't even have time to spend money on cars, vacations, dinners, dates, etc.
  4. It is a means to an end, related to n. # 1. The doors that open for you once you complete the program are good, and there are more doors for the people who stay with it.
  5. Lack of interesting options / alternatives. When you work so hard, you don't really even have time to look for another job. Unless actively hired. Unfortunately, you really don't have the ability to disappear on a regular basis for an interview. It would be noticed and it would be risky.

No, if I compare it to running a startup.

I used to think that when I left Goldman, running my own company would be a piece of cake. It was far from it, and after 4 years and a lot of sweat, aches, and tears it's only now starting to come together, but I miss something that GS gave me that my startup didn't have when I started Oddup: a plethora of talent to trust and work with. .

Why is life at GS bad? I used to think it was difficult, always working, always checking my blackberry. The disappointment that the bonuses weren't amazing when I worked so hard for it, because the company had a bad year. Actually i

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No, if I compare it to running a startup.

I used to think that when I left Goldman, running my own company would be a piece of cake. It was far from it, and after 4 years and a lot of sweat, aches, and tears it's only now starting to come together, but I miss something that GS gave me that my startup didn't have when I started Oddup: a plethora of talent to trust and work with. .

Why is life at GS bad? I used to think it was difficult, always working, always checking my blackberry. The disappointment that the bonuses weren't amazing when I worked so hard for it, because the company had a bad year. They actually paid me well and the bonus was a luxury.

If I compare it to running a company, GS was a breath of fresh air and a breeze. When I took a vacation at GS, I had a vacation. When I looked at my bank balance each month, my salary would come in. When I called someone to help me, there was someone there. Running Oddup, Alluva, and Unicornhunt has taught me that the superior talent GS has is the reason he's not bad.

If life is bad for you at GS, then the simple answer is that you are probably performing poorly and will lose your job soon.

Before joining, you need to know three things:

1. It is difficult to join Goldman

The interview process is tedious. I went through 30 interviews, 3 times more than with any other institution. Anyone who interviews you can potentially veto your hiring. The competition is fierce. You need to prepare thoroughly.

2. It is difficult to work at Goldman

The work ethic is phenomenal. The people around you are smart. I was the dumbest on the trading floor and that made me grow enormously. The company will challenge and pressure you, but it will be the best investment for you and your skills.

3. It's hard to leave Goldm

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Before joining, you need to know three things:

1. It is difficult to join Goldman

The interview process is tedious. I went through 30 interviews, 3 times more than with any other institution. Anyone who interviews you can potentially veto your hiring. The competition is fierce. You need to prepare thoroughly.

2. It is difficult to work at Goldman

The work ethic is phenomenal. The people around you are smart. I was the dumbest on the trading floor and that made me grow enormously. The company will challenge and pressure you, but it will be the best investment for you and your skills.

3. It's hard to leave Goldman

I left Goldman for Morgan Stanley in 2009. It took me 3 days to resign, as they made it very tough for me to go. I eventually left as it was the best decision for me at the time, but they invested a lot of time and energy in trying to convince me to stay.

In terms of advice once you join, please check my answer to a similar question: Rafael Sarandeses's answer to What are some useful tips for someone who is starting work at Goldman Sachs?

Going anonymous here for obvious reasons.

The answers here are somewhat ridiculous. I worked at Goldman, and now work at Google. The comments around pay here are really inaccurate.

At Goldman, they will always pay top dollar for top talent. Including front office and back office (please save the back office/front office arguments if any for another thread).

In theory, you could very realistically earn 500K + in your 30s. It is common knowledge within the firm that all US-based physicians receive a base salary of 500,000.

Now, the following calculations are based on the fact that it has a very high performance.

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Go anonymous here for obvious reasons.

The answers here are somewhat ridiculous. I worked at Goldman and now I work at Google. The comments about the payment here are really inaccurate.

At Goldman, they will always pay the best price for the best talent. Including front office and back office (please save the back office / front office arguments if any for another thread).

In theory, you could very realistically earn 500K + in your 30s. It is common knowledge within the firm that all US-based physicians receive a base salary of 500,000.

Now the following calculations are based on the fact that you’re a very high performer. If you’re not performing, I think its fair to say, you don’t deserve to draw a salary that is several standard deviations away from the average American family household wage. Please tailor your expectation as such.

Assumptions for GS Tech employees:

You graduate college at 22

You spend 3.5 years as an analyst - A0, A1, A2, A3 (50k - 100k)

2 years as an associate - Associate, Senior Associate (100k - 150k)

5 years as a VP - Team Lead, Department Manager, Group Manager (150k - 500k)

Managing Director (500k +)

These figures are not including bonus. Granted… the bonus figure isn’t going to be as high as your counterparts in sales and trading.

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