What are the different mistakes and errors in English?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by George Mason



What are the different mistakes and errors in English?

There are many common mistakes people make accidentally (for example, changing the possessive and plural forms and vice versa), but the biggest one that I have observed that even professional writers (including almost all journalists) make is the incorrect use of hyphens in Compound adjectives. .

It is such a common and almost ubiquitous mistake that it has become one of my favorites. It's even more annoying because the rule is so simple, logical, and intuitive. Use it correctly and your sentence will be read very clearly. Use it incorrectly (which most newspaper editors seem to prefer), and you'll end up without

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There are many common mistakes people make accidentally (for example, changing the possessive and plural forms and vice versa), but the biggest one that I have observed that even professional writers (including almost all journalists) make is the incorrect use of hyphens in Compound adjectives. .

It is such a common and almost ubiquitous mistake that it has become one of my favorites. It's even more annoying because the rule is so simple, logical, and intuitive. Use it correctly and your sentence will be read very clearly. Use it incorrectly (which most newspaper editors seem to prefer) and you'll end up with a very confusing sentence.

So this is the rule:

Generally, separate two or more words when they come before a noun that they modify and act as a single idea. This is called a compound adjective.

Examples:
an
avant-garde design of an off-campus apartment

When a compound adjective follows a noun, a hyphen is usually not necessary.

Example: the apartment is off campus.

However, some established compound adjectives are always separated by hyphens. Double check with a dictionary or online.

Example: the design is state of the art.

—Scripts | Scoring rules

There is a very similar rule regarding verbs, but most people have no problem adhering to it:

A hyphen is often required when forming original compound verbs for vivid writing, humor, or special situations.

Examples:
The lazy man made his way through life in video games.
Queen Victoria sat on the throne for six decades.

—Scripts | Scoring rules

And there is a nearly identical one for forming unusual compound nouns, which most writers also seem to understand most of the time, unless the compound noun is a hyphenated modification of another compound noun (e.g. anti-something-something , quasi-something-something, etc.).

It is only when compound adjectives are formed that most writers throw all logic and common sense out the window.

This is the most recent example I have come across (from the Vox article: Racial Demons Helping Explain Evangelical Support for Trump):

Only a small minority of Christians challenged the many brutal policies against Native Americans that went hand in hand with the settlement of North America.

Well, what is that bold phrase supposed to mean? Are you referring to Indian government policies that are anti-American? Are you referring to policies towards Indians that the author considers anti-American because they conflict with our national values?

In fact, the author was referring to the policies that were devised to persecute American Indians. So he should have written "brutal policies against American Indians." Because the adjective phrase is supposed to describe something that is opposed to American Indians, not something that is anti-American or opposed to Americans.

But this article is not the only one to make this mistake. It would be difficult to find a news article that correctly separates similar phrases. The only explanation I can think of is that news editors hate punctuation. It makes sense in print to leave commas where you can get away with keeping the character countdown. But it doesn't really make sense online unless it's more of an aesthetic preference. But even then, you shouldn't sacrifice clarity for aesthetics.

When I text my friends, I hardly ever say the phrase "I'm going to" or "I want to." It's almost instinct, but I use "I go", "I want", "coulda", "mighta", "issa", or the bigger one, "How are you?", Short for "how would you be", which is nonsense, and I use as "how are you going to finish?".

Grammatical errors in English are usually found by replacing "z" with "s", or by spelling words as they really sound. For example, "You realized you made a mistake" should be "You realized you made a mistake." "I hated losing" should be "I hated losing." I see that a lot.

FUN FACT: Autoco from Quora

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When I text my friends, I hardly ever say the phrase "I'm going to" or "I want to." It's almost instinct, but I use "I go", "I want", "coulda", "mighta", "issa", or the bigger one, "How are you?", Short for "how would you be", which is nonsense, and I use as "how are you going to finish?".

Grammatical errors in English are usually found by replacing "z" with "s", or by spelling words as they really sound. For example, "You realized you made a mistake" should be "You realized you made a mistake." "I hated losing" should be "I hated losing." I see that a lot.

FUN FACT: Quora autocorrect doesn't recognize the word "positivity" as a word. I've spent a lot of time rewriting and googling the word to make sure I spell it correctly, but it keeps telling me it's misspelled.

I hear the phrase "you did well" quite often. This is grammatically incorrect depending on what you are describing. If you are describing the ethical nature of the person's work, "good" is correct. If you are describing how the object performed, the appropriate phrase is "did it well."

For plural nouns, use singular verbs. For singular nouns, use plural verbs. "He is" "They are" "United States is" "The nations are"

"Literally" goes the way of the word "heinous". "Egregious" used to mean excellent or competent. The word was then used with such sarcasm that it now means terrible or over-the-top. "Literally" originally meant "verbatim", but is now used more like "figuratively".

ESL speakers often miss your articles, which is normal and part of learning. Phrases like "don't be a liar", "what you say" or "look at me now" are common mistakes.

The Oxford comma is a long battle in the English language. Applying to a list of items, the Oxford comma in a list is to the right, above, here, and just to the left. Without the Oxford comma it would be fine, it's over, here and now it's gone. It's an open debate, so it's not really a bug, as long as it's consistent in whether you use it or not.


Written in twelve minutes, this answer is likely to contain several grammatical errors, demonstrating the complex nature of the English language.

Here's the most basic of mistakes, and most native English speakers get it wrong! Whenever you refer to yourself and another person who is the subject of a sentence, you start with "(that person's name) and me." However, when they are the object of prayer, you say "(that person's name) and me."

Example: Jim and I went to school. Jim and me were given the books at school.

Sometime in the 1960s, people said "Jim and me" as the subject of prayer and teachers would correct students. Students in the United States were taught to say "Jim and me." Then the over-cor began

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Here's the most basic of mistakes, and most native English speakers get it wrong! Whenever you refer to yourself and another person who is the subject of a sentence, you start with "(that person's name) and me." However, when they are the object of prayer, you say "(that person's name) and me."

Example: Jim and I went to school. Jim and me were given the books at school.

Sometime in the 1960s, people said "Jim and me" as the subject of prayer and teachers would correct students. Students in the United States were taught to say "Jim and me." Then the overcorrection began. Native English speakers now say, "They gave the books to Jim and me. This issue is just between Jim and me. They borrowed the books from Jim and me." (The latter makes me cringe !!) This bug has become so rampant that it has crossed the pond and I have actually heard it used incorrectly on British programming on PBS, for example, and have also heard it on shows outside of Australia. I blame what happened in America for this trend and it probably spread through our media. That 'It's rare to hear him speak correctly, But if you hear very polite people talking, you will hear them say, “They gave me and Jim the books. The issue is just between me and Jim. They borrowed Jim's book and mine. "

Please, please, inform your fellow English speakers about this error and help them correct it. It is so rampant and everyone thinks they are being scholarly when in reality they are making a huge, noisy mistake!

Here's a trick: take out the other person's name and end up with the correct pronoun:

I went to school. They gave me the books. They were my books.

It depends on what you mean by "grammar". Most people group all sorts of things under that label that, by linguists' standards, aren't really grammatical: misspellings, misplaced apostrophes, jargon, and so on. So I'll focus on three things that actually touch grammar a bit.

  1. "Who" versus "who": This confuses even the best of us, and people tend to overcorrect and use "who" whenever they aren't sure which one to use. In general, "who" is used when it is the object of a verb and "who" when it is the subject of a verb. Confusion often occurs in the question: "Who / who received the invitation?"
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It depends on what you mean by "grammar". Most people group all sorts of things under that label that, by linguists' standards, aren't really grammatical: misspellings, misplaced apostrophes, jargon, and so on. So I'll focus on three things that actually touch grammar a bit.

  1. "Who" versus "who": This confuses even the best of us, and people tend to overcorrect and use "who" whenever they aren't sure which one to use. In general, "who" is used when it is the object of a verb and "who" when it is the subject of a verb. Confusion often occurs in the question: "Who / who received the invitation?" "Did you give that invitation to who / whom?" The trick is to substitute "he" for "who" and "he" for "who." So it's "Who / he received the invitation?" and "Did you give him / her that invitation?"
  2. "Que yo" versus "que yo": this is a grammatical mess, actually, and it's the fault of the "what". "Than" can be a conjunction that joins two clauses ("She is messier than me") or a preposition ("She is messier than me"). In general, if it goes with “que yo”, add the verb after; if you drop the verb, use "yo".
  3. "Was" vs. "Were": The subjunctive. Bleh. The subjunctive is an English verb mode used to describe wishes, hypothetical situations, demands, suggestions, and conditions that are contrary to fact. If you are still with me, the form of most English subjunctive verbs is identical to the infinitive form: "He demanded that she leave the premises." The problem is that the subjunctive form of the verb "be" is not "be", but "were". (English!) Because "were" is also a past form of the verb "be", people often accidentally substitute "was". The general rule of thumb is this: if you are talking about something that is not real at the moment and you are using the verb "ser", you should probably use "were" and not "was":

There are many common mistakes we make when communicating in English.

  1. We usually say "Good night" at about 5 or 6 pm or so, when we are leaving someone and we are not going to meet him thereafter the same day and we will only see him the next day. Here the correct expression is "Good evening", even if the departure time is at 5 or 6 pm more or less because we are going to meet the person the next day only and there is a night in between. On the other hand we say "Good evening" if we meet a person at 8 or 9 pm or later. As good night is said only when we leave, good night must be said ev
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There are many common mistakes we make when communicating in English.

  1. We usually say “Good night” at about 5 or 6 pm or so, when we are leaving someone and we are not going to meet him thereafter the same day and we will only see him the next day. Here the correct expression is "Good evening", even if the departure time is at 5 or 6 pm more or less because we are going to meet the person the next day only and there is a night in between. On the other hand we say "Good evening" if we meet a person at 8 or 9 pm or later. As good night is said only when we leave, good night should be said even if it is 8, 9 or 10 at night, good night is said when we meet someone and good night when we go out to meet the next day, regardless of the clock time,
  2. A mistake is also made when using the article 'EL'. As a general rule, the article 'EL' should be used with the name of the nationality, but should not be used with the name of the language. Since the name of certain languages ​​and nationalities is the same, we made a mistake when using the article with both. Example:
  3. Wrong: French always likes to communicate in French
  4. Correct: French people always like to communicate in French
  5. The article 'THE' must be used with the first French, which is the name of a nationality, while "THE '" must not be used with the second French, which indicates the name of the French language.
  6. Another grammatical mistake we make is that we use 's' after numbers like dozen, hundred, thousand, year, etc. when a number is used before them.
  7. Wrong: A 10-year-old boy got lost in the market.
  8. Correct: A 10-year-old boy got lost in the market.
  9. We also make a mistake when using 's with non-living things, whereas it should be used with people only to indicate possessive sense.
  10. Incorrect: Someone broke the arm of this chair.
  11. Correct: Someone broke the arm of this chair.
  12. Incorrect: What is your brother's name?
  13. Correct: What is your brother's name?
  14. Another common mistake we make is the incorrect use of auxiliary verbs with nouns such as entries, calls, politics, etc. We generally use the plural verb after them, while the singular verb must be used after them.
  15. Incorrect: the court has issued a subpoena
  16. Correct: The court has issued a subpoena.
  17. Usually we also make mistakes when using "And" and "But", And as a conjunction joins two similar senses in a sentence, while Pero joins two opposite senses.
  18. Incorrect: I passed the exam and my brother failed.
  19. Correct: I passed the exam but my brother failed.
  20. Incorrect: Our team won the match but was also selected for the tournament at the national level.
  21. Correct: Our team won the match and was also selected for the tournament at the national level.
  22. Another common mistake we make is that we use 'NO' after 'UNLESS' and 'UNTIL'. Because A minus and Hasta already convey the negative meaning.
  23. Wrong: No one will believe you unless you do not amend your ways.
  24. Correct: No one will believe you unless you amend your ways.
  25. Incorrect: We waited for him until he came.
  26. Correct: We waited for it until it arrived.

We also make a mistake when using the plural auxiliary verb where the sentence begins with 'Uno de'

Wrong: One of your friends was caught smoking.

Correct: One of your friends was caught smoking.

Typical mistakes made by upper-intermediate students of English as a Foreign Language are: -

  • Use the present simple when the continuum is needed (for example, "Wait, I think" instead of "Wait, I'm thinking").
  • Using the present perfect (or even the present simple) when the past simple would be better. "Yesterday I went shopping." (or even "Yesterday I went shopping") instead of "Yesterday I went shopping".
  • Forget basic articles / problems with articles. "(The or A) house is near (the or a) station." Here, one word is required from each given pair (or from possible additional alternatives).
  • Answering n
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Typical mistakes made by upper-intermediate students of English as a Foreign Language are: -

  • Use the present simple when the continuum is needed (for example, "Wait, I think" instead of "Wait, I'm thinking").
  • Using the present perfect (or even the present simple) when the past simple would be better. "Yesterday I went shopping." (or even "Yesterday I went shopping") instead of "Yesterday I went shopping".
  • Forget basic articles / problems with articles. "(The or A) house is near (the or a) station." Here, one word is required from each given pair (or from possible additional alternatives).
  • Answer negative “Yes / No” questions incorrectly. “There are no people living on the moon, right? - Yes, there aren't ". (It should be" No, there aren't ")
  • Question formation: "When do you go shopping?" - it should be "When do you go shopping?"
  • Using the simple present for the immediate future. "I'm hungry, I cook something." (could be "I'm going to cook something" or "I'm going to cook something").
  • Use "will" or "would" after "if": "I'll stay home tomorrow if it rains." - it should be "I'll stay home tomorrow if it rains."
  • Problems with basic liabilities: "Cheese is made (made) in many parts of the world."
  • Thinking that "anyone" has a negative meaning
  • Confusion with noun + noun, for example, between "garden flower" and "flower garden"

See my Quora post on how ESL learners can deal with grammar issues

  • Visit my Quora English Language Learning Center.

If you need feedback on your writing, or need lessons, homework or speaking practice, visit my website British English Language Consultancy.

In the unlikely event that my website is down for any reason, please email me at adrian.parr1966@gmail.com. None of my services depend on my website to function; my services are via email and, in many cases, also via Skype (or Google Hangouts, or landline).

New edition: -

  • The word "after" requires 2 pieces of information: the error marked below with an "X" is common for less advanced students.

… And after dinner, I went to bed. ✔︎

… And after dinner, I went to bed. ✔︎

… And after dinner, I went to bed. ✔︎

… And I went to bed after dinner. ✔︎

… And I went to bed after dinner. ✔︎

… And I went to bed after dinner. ✔︎

… And after I go to bed. X (This is incorrect, because the listener is waiting for the second data, for example "... and after I went to bed, there was a loud knock on the door" (✔︎))

__________________

... and then I went to bed. ✔︎

… And then I went to bed. ✔︎

Hello, I hope you find my answer useful. Here are some common grammar mistakes we make.

  • "They are" versus "His" versus "There"

"They're" is a contraction of "they are", "Their" is a possessive pronoun, while "There" refers to a place. Now you know the difference between the three. Next time just remember to use them wisely.

Correct use: they still live there, right? - No. Your house was sold last year.

  • You vs are

"Tu" is a possessive pronoun, while "Eres" is a contraction of "tú eres".

Correct use: you are beautiful in your own way.

  • "Es" versus "Su"

This one tends to confuse

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Hello, I hope you find my answer useful. Here are some common grammar mistakes we make.

  • "They are" versus "His" versus "There"

"They're" is a contraction of "they are", "Their" is a possessive pronoun, while "There" refers to a place. Now you know the difference between the three. Next time just remember to use them wisely.

Correct use: they still live there, right? - No. Your house was sold last year.

  • You vs are

"Tu" is a possessive pronoun, while "Eres" is a contraction of "tú eres".

Correct use: you are beautiful in your own way.

  • "Es" versus "Su"

This one tends to confuse even the best writers. Many people stumble because "es" has an "after," which usually means something is possessive, as in, "I stayed at Linda's house last night." But in this case, it is actually a contraction of "is".

In other words, we use "its" as the possessive pronoun and "it's" for the shortened version of "it is".

Correct use 1: It is raining.

Correct use 2: The dog bit the bone.

  • "So" versus "what"

"Than" is a conjunction that is used mainly to make comparisons. "Then" is primarily an adverb that is used to place actions in time.

Correct use 1: I play soccer better than him.

Correct use 2: We prepare dinner and then eat it.

  • "De" versus "Have"

It is true that many of us often say "should", which sounds quite like a shortened version of "should of". But sadly, "should of" does not exist in correct English. The correct one is "should have".

Correct usage: I should have done my homework on Sunday (or should have done my homework on Sunday).

  • "Affect" vs. "effect"

"Affect" is a verb used when talking about the act of changing. If you are talking about the change itself, you should use "effect".

Correct Use 1: That movie had a great effect on me.

Correct use 2: That movie affected me a lot.

  • "Two" vs. "Too Much" vs. "Until"

"Two" is a number.

"Also" is synonymous with "also".

"For" is a preposition. It is used to express movement, although often not literally, towards a person, place or thing.

Correct use 1: I sent the mail to my teacher.

Correct use 2: She is also vegan.

  • "Who" versus "Who"

"Who" refers to the subject of a sentence and "who" refers to the object of the verb or preposition.

Correct use 1: Who ate my sandwich?

Correct use 2: Who should I ask?

Source: 8 of the most common grammar mistakes we make

The most common ones I've noticed lately:

Write phrasal verbs as a word

Teachers are reminded to pick up their children at 1:00 pm tomorrow.

In this sentence, collect is the correct use. A phrasal verb is a verb plus a preposition. It is two words. The to is a clue that what follows is an infinitive, or the basic form of a verb.

The confusion comes from pickup being a word when used as an adjective or noun:

The boys played a game of basketball until dark. (Adjective)

The Mariners traded for Shed Long. That is a good pickup for them! (Noun)

So remember:

Phrasal verb - two words

Adjec

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The most common ones I've noticed lately:

Write phrasal verbs as a word

Teachers are reminded to pick up their children at 1:00 pm tomorrow.

In this sentence, collect is the correct use. A phrasal verb is a verb plus a preposition. It is two words. The to is a clue that what follows is an infinitive, or the basic form of a verb.

The confusion comes from pickup being a word when used as an adjective or noun:

The boys played a game of basketball until dark. (Adjective)

The Mariners traded for Shed Long. That is a good pickup for them! (Noun)

So remember:

Phrasal verb - two words

Adjective / Noun - one word

Other examples of incorrect use of phrasal verb:

After work, I go to the gym to exercise.

The teacher said that we can make up work from the days we were sick.

I hope your Jeep doesn't break down again.

Trump closed the government.

Use an apostrophe to pluralize words.

I'm not sure how this became a trend, but using an apostrophe before an S makes the word possessive. There are some exceptions to when the 's is appropriate for a plural noun, but it is rarely appropriate.

His two dogs are always mean to me.

There is no reason to show possession in this sentence. Dogs is the plural form of the word. Stay with it.

The Smiths are coming to visit.

This sentence also has no reason to prove possession. Now if the Smiths' dogs came to visit, you'd need the apostrophe.

Be careful with your p's and q's.

Well, this is one of the exceptions. The apostrophe helps the reader see that the first letter should be seen as a word, with the s forming each plural. Most stylebooks agree to use the apostrophe here because the words are in lowercase. Skipping it can lead to misunderstandings or incorrect pronunciations.

He has two MBAs: one in marketing and one in finance.

This should be MBA. There is no confusion to avoid here. Leaving the apostrophe aside will not lead to any misunderstanding.

First ... second ... that is, there is only "first ... of ALL". "Second of all" is used all the time and is incorrect.

Most Americans cannot use the past tense of "lie down (lie down)" correctly. "I lay down there" or "I lay down there" are heard all the time and are incorrect. (I was lying / lying there). "Place" is transitive and requires an object (I was just laying bricks).

"A number of people." "Amount" is used incorrectly in place of "multiple people" all the time. That is, if you can count individually (people) use "number"; if not (flour) use “amount”.

"Infer" is commonly confused f

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First ... second ... that is, there is only "first ... of ALL". "Second of all" is used all the time and is incorrect.

Most Americans cannot use the past tense of "lie down (lie down)" correctly. "I lay down there" or "I lay down there" are heard all the time and are incorrect. (I was lying / lying there). "Place" is transitive and requires an object (I was just laying bricks).

"A number of people." "Amount" is used incorrectly in place of "multiple people" all the time. That is, if you can count individually (people) use "number"; if not (flour) use “amount”.

"Inferir" se confunde comúnmente con "implicar". "¿Estás infiriendo que estoy equivocado?"

"Ojalá lo hubiera hecho" se escucha todo el tiempo y es incorrecto. “Ojalá lo hubiera hecho”.

”It is important that he takes the right decision” is incorrect. It should be “it is important that he take the right decision” (subjunctive). This is now almost always used incorrectly.

”It’s me that has been wronged” is indeed completely wrong. It should be “it is I who have been wronged”.

I’ll stop there..

Some nouns are used only as singular. They have no plural forms.Luggage, Furniture, Information, News, Paper, Poetry, Machinery, Bread, Soap, Advice, Scenery, etc., No need to add suffixes such as S or ES at the end of the root word. have received some information.It is incorrect to use Informations.Would you mind looking after my luggage for a while.Some nouns are in plural form but they are used as singular forms like Economics, Civics, Physics, Politics, Athletics, Mathematics, Mumps , Bil ...

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There are so many options here. I'm not sure how I would quantify and categorize grammar errors.

Technically, ending a sentence with a preposition is wrong. This practice is so common that we often ignore it now. I'm standing outside during a fire alarm (false alarm!) Writing this. One of my students was on her phone calling someone. "Where are you?" Yuck! I made fun of my brother a few years ago for something similar. He responded with, "Where are you, bitch?" Touch. This error is so common now that we rarely notice it.

We often have subject-verb agreement errors or moments when the pronoun

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There are so many options here. I'm not sure how I would quantify and categorize grammar errors.

Technically, ending a sentence with a preposition is wrong. This practice is so common that we often ignore it now. I'm standing outside during a fire alarm (false alarm!) Writing this. One of my students was on her phone calling someone. "Where are you?" Yuck! I made fun of my brother a few years ago for something similar. He responded with, "Where are you, bitch?" Touch. This error is so common now that we rarely notice it.

We often have subject verb agreement errors or times when the pronoun and antecedent do not agree. This is usually when the subject is a bit complicated by appositives, infinitives, prepositional phrases, etc. “One of these students who want to go to the store and bought some milk is/are going to pay for all of this,” can really trouble people.

One thing which is really bothering me? Typos. So many people cannot seem to write an upper-case “I” or put spaces after punctuation (placing it before, instead).

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