What are the common exaggerations employers say in a job interview?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Cayson Ingram



What are the common exaggerations employers say in a job interview?

Having been on both sides of the equation (as an employer and employee), and having hired over 30 people (some as a human resources manager for an Inc. 5000 company), I can tell you up front that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to this question. On the one hand, the framework assumes that the hiring manager will invariably exaggerate, when he may simply be using well-intentioned assumptions based on current company forecasts.

The best way to find out if your potential employer will keep its promises in the future is to study your past. If you know your history within a

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Having been on both sides of the equation (as an employer and employee), and having hired over 30 people (some as a human resources manager for an Inc. 5000 company), I can tell you up front that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to this question. On the one hand, the framework assumes that the hiring manager will invariably exaggerate, when he may simply be using well-intentioned assumptions based on current company forecasts.

The best way to find out if your potential employer will keep its promises in the future is to study your past. By knowing their history inside and out as part of your interview preparation, you will be able to see the offer and spot any variations from the norm. Does the employer project growth that is unrealistic, based on what he knows at this time? Has the employer kept its promises to employees in the past? What you consider "deliverable" or not will vary greatly according to your knowledge of the field and your predictive and analytical skills.

There are some perennial claims that employers use as a natural part of their marketing efforts to recruit and retain top talent. You will need to evaluate each situation differently. It would be quite difficult to compile a complete list of these common claims, or even the main ones. Studying some of the cognitive biases can be useful to analyze what is offered and where the employer is coming from: http://b.qr.ae/a95Bt9

(If you ever suspect that an employer is intentionally misleading you, then I don't see why you would want to work there.)

I include here three statements that come to mind, not by any means the top three, but a few that I have found helpful when considering deals:

1. "We are going to be the next X", where X is the main leader in his field. It's one thing if your employer is Pfizer and the plan is to outnumber major pharmaceutical companies Johnson & Johnson. It's another thing to say that your new startup will be the next Facebook. No one can imply that kind of certainty to predict what will be the next of anything. This is almost in line with a claim some companies make regarding their marketing: "Our work will go viral."

2. "It would come at the right time. We are going to work with XYZ" where XYZ represents a very impressive company, entity or customer. Unless there is a strong prior relationship with XYZ, a contract has already been executed, or the employer has a verifiable history of working with clients of the same caliber, you can privately discard this information in your mind so that it does not influence your decision. Employers in certain industries (such as entertainment) have been known to highlight otherwise tenuous connections to enhance their appeal. I've seen multi-million dollar deals that seemed set in stone crumble before my eyes ... only to find that the employer didn't have the basis to back the goal. Lesson: yes no

3. Claiming your compensation will increase in the future as long as your contribution level remains the same. Let's say the median salary for the value you will bring in the new position is $ 70,000, which the employer offers to start with. Let's say the promise is that in six months or a year you will earn double ($ 140,000) in the same position. Unless you're in sales or marketing, or working with a scalable, performance-based salary structure (hedge funds, investment banking, production, etc.), you're unlikely to get such a raise doing exactly what you were. hired for. How can you expect such a raise without an increase in the value it provides? There is almost always a salary cap on the minds of hiring managers, and as you start working, That limit can become difficult to overcome. Of course, you might get promoted, but any initial discussion about future compensation that doesn't make it to paper should be taken for what it is.

I say: research the employer's history thoroughly, make your own future employer projections using whatever information is available BEFORE you get to the interview (to avoid suggestion), examine the list of cognitive biases, trace the reasoning behind the claims, and promises to ask for more specificity where appropriate, and to dive into the interview in good faith and without the expectation of being misled by hype. And if so, you must be well equipped to handle it.

Here are a few that I experienced at a company I worked for:

"We lead our industry in technology," which explains why the brand name pens they gave me on day one didn't work and why each team of 6 was working on a different system that didn't work with each other and required a lot of work for a view consolidated.

"We're always available," so my boss was busy on the first day and for most of the week, and his assistant showed me, introduced me, and gave me suggestions on what I could get started on. I came in as vice president.

"We support creativity and independence, we are market l

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Here are a few that I experienced at a company I worked for:

"We lead our industry in technology," which explains why the brand name pens they gave me on day one didn't work and why each team of 6 was working on a different system that didn't work with each other and required a lot of work for a view consolidated.

"We're always available," so my boss was busy on the first day and for most of the week, and his assistant showed me, introduced me, and gave me suggestions on what I could get started on. I came in as vice president.

"We support creativity and independence, we are market leaders and innovators, and not micromanagers" - this was true; however, it meant that politics, warring cliques, and CEOs fighting turf wars were all too common.

"We encourage transparency and accountability" is also true, but not in the way that most would expect. The first two weeks I was there, I noticed people disappearing for a while and then reappearing throughout the day for what seemed like personal appointments (and it wasn't bonus or review time). Later I learned that they were being deposed; the person he had replaced was being investigated and charged (and ultimately convicted, if I remember correctly) for insider trading with information obtained at work. Transparency was very important, especially after the fact; and accountability manifested itself in a legal settling of accounts.

Nonetheless, that job turned out to be one of the most intellectually challenging and fulfilling I've ever had, working with people who are easily among the best, the brightest, and the most motivated I've ever worked with. (My boss's assistant, by the way, was smart, motivated, hardworking; she didn't have a college degree, had a daughter at 15, and felt extremely lucky to have a job. I was very lucky to work with her. She was the best ... and was promoted quickly, although not as far as it should have gone, due to that annoying degree).

Risk takers are like that. Sometimes they take risks and hire you. I went through a glove of six interviews for my second round for that job, which I didn't think I would get. He had the feeling that they weren't telling the whole truth, until the end.

But that's okay; sometimes you just have to make a leap of faith and let a few things slide. I met one of my best friends through that job. Quite impressive result in every way, even though they lied, a lot.

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