What are the chances that people over 40 will find jobs in Silicon Valley startups if they are not engineers?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Kamron Pratt



What are the chances that people over 40 will find jobs in Silicon Valley startups if they are not engineers?

The job market changes when you're in your 40s anywhere from Silicon Valley to New York. It's also not easy to get corporate jobs when you're over 40.

My experience is that medium-sized companies are usually the best option: they have some money; they care about results and need talent.

The key is to find a way to make your experience so valuable to them that they think it's a bargain - that means you have a proven skill (like business development) and you've worked hard to be a digital expert and knowledgeable about the competition in a specific domain. sector.

The only change I have seen is that it takes people

Keep reading

The job market changes when you're in your 40s anywhere from Silicon Valley to New York. It's also not easy to get corporate jobs when you're over 40.

My experience is that medium-sized companies are usually the best option: they have some money; they care about results and need talent.

The key is to find a way to make your experience so valuable to them that they think it's a bargain - that means you have a proven skill (like business development) and you've worked hard to be a digital expert and knowledgeable about the competition in a specific domain. sector.

The only change I've seen is that it takes people longer to find the right fit now, but there are jobs for you out there.

Good luck!

I would say that the question of not being an engineer is secondary to a much bigger problem. And that is, there is age discrimination and rampant elitism in the San Francisco Bay Area when it comes to jobs at highly visible tech companies. Your best bet is to look for companies that are growing, but are not necessarily a magnet for young job seekers and narcissists.

Also, I think there are those who would compare the current job market, locally and nationally, to that of the lifeboat scene in the movie "Titanic." That is, this is still an employer market, and until that changes, expect h

Keep reading

I would say that the question of not being an engineer is secondary to a much bigger problem. And that is, there is age discrimination and rampant elitism in the San Francisco Bay Area when it comes to jobs at highly visible tech companies. Your best bet is to look for companies that are growing, but are not necessarily a magnet for young job seekers and narcissists.

Also, I think there are those who would compare the current job market, locally and nationally, to that of the lifeboat scene in the movie "Titanic." I mean, this is still an employer market, and until that changes, expect you have to work twice as hard as someone in their 20s and 30s to make it work. Unless, of course, there is some kind of landmark legal case against the tech giants for primarily hiring professionals in their 20s and 30s.

Everything is down in Silicon Valley: eBay, Amazon, Google (if you want it again), Facebook, EA, Cisco, Adobe, Nvidia, Netflix, Apple, Intel, Hewlett-Packard, Yahoo !, Oracle, Atari, Pixar, PayPal (part of eBay), LinkedIn, Logitech, Sony, YouTube, Yelp, Siemens, Samsung, and best of all, Quora.

You have so many options in Silicon Valley. Unfortunately, I don't know all of your openings or positions, but with so many companies, you are sure to find something.

Silicon Valley is very expensive to live, your commute probably sucks, and your work can probably be done from anywhere.

I had a job in the bay area and the salary was pretty ridiculous. I was earning six figures and took the train to work (paid for by my employer). I had lunch at work (paid for by my employer) and had dinner two nights a week (again, paid for by my employer). That said, I had a ten to fifteen minute bike ride to a 30 minute express train, at best. If I missed that train, it would end up with a train ride of more than 50 minutes.

So right there, I spend more than 2 hours

Keep reading

Silicon Valley is very expensive to live, your commute probably sucks, and your work can probably be done from anywhere.

I had a job in the bay area and the salary was pretty ridiculous. I was earning six figures and took the train to work (paid for by my employer). I had lunch at work (paid for by my employer) and had dinner two nights a week (again, paid for by my employer). That said, I had a ten to fifteen minute bike ride to a 30 minute express train, at best. If I missed that train, it would end up with a train ride of more than 50 minutes.

So right there, I spend more than 2 hours a day traveling, and it turned out that this was actually much faster than driving by car. Now, I had a one-bedroom apartment that I was paying a measly $ 2,400 a month for, plus utilities and $ 150 a month for my car parking that I couldn't drive to work but needed. Now my apartment was really nice and I can't rightly complain about my lifestyle. That said, most of the people I worked with didn't live alone, if they were younger they had roommates, and if they were older they were married. Yes, if you are going to put four people in a 3 bedroom house (one person sleeps in the living room), you will pay less in rent. Oh, and his ride sucks too.

Do you want to buy a house? It will probably be a million dollars or more. Theoretically, owning property is the best way to build wealth in America. If your mortgage payment is roughly equal to your rent, the interest is tax deductible and, in theory, the money for the loan comes back to you when you sell. But you're going to need a couple hundred thousand dollars to think about making a down payment.

I went to school in Rochester, NY. A downtown luxury apartment within walking distance of my favorite coffee shop, a local food cooperative, and about a mile from the big farmers market or local grocery chain will cost less than $ 1500 a month and comes with a Free cable and gym membership. A 20% down payment on a 2000 square foot house in the suburbs will be $ 48,000 or about two years of rent on my cheap apartment (or one year on that house where four people lived). Oh, and if you're working remotely, your commute is literally the time it takes you to get to your home office, so you don't have to travel during peak hours.

Now, in theory, the amenities are worse, but that really depends on what you want. Sure, the best restaurants in Silicon Valley are probably more "nice" than those in Rochester, and San Francisco has better museums than Rochester. But we have the same movies and TV shows. We have the same internet. Heck, we have better bagels and pizza in New York (which is kind of a joke, but also a serious point about the food you're going to eat). The schools are basically fine (and if they aren't, the private schools are cheaper than in the bay area and you have more cash). The nightlife is fine, depending on what you want.

I'm talking about Rochester NY because it's where I went to college and I'm homesick. However, the thing is, I could easily have talked about an idyllic New England town, or a country house in Texas, or a million other places you could live because I happen to get paid a lot to do this job.

The other piece that you should really touch is economic inequality. When I first moved to the Bay Area, I looked at the apartment buildings. Many apartment complexes in Silicon Valley, especially the more urban ones, are designed to keep the right people in and the rest, well, out. The most… extreme of these was a building that took up an entire block. There was an inner courtyard that was completely hidden from the street. You couldn't see outside, the people there couldn't see inside. There was a pool, barbecue areas, garden furniture, the works. The apartments themselves were very nice, but they were all designed to keep you inside the building. There was basically nothing outside. The building was designed around the idea that it is not necessary to go outside. You take your car out of your fully enclosed garage in this apartment building, and you go somewhere that is not nearby to live, work, eat or whatever. When you're done, you go back to the bubble that this apartment building creates. Never mind that there is a homeless camp a few blocks away. You can relax in your semi-private pool. The poverty here is notorious and honestly it's very sad if you don't become numb to it. I'm not trying to put my discomfort at seeing a homeless person above the discomfort of the homeless person who is homeless, but if you gave me the option to leave the city I live in and just ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. You can relax in your semi-private pool. The poverty here is notorious and, honestly, it is very sad if you do not become insensitive to it. I'm not trying to put my discomfort at seeing a homeless person above the discomfort of the homeless person who is homeless, but if you gave me the option to leave the city I live in and just ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. You can relax in your semi-private pool. The poverty here is notorious and honestly it's very sad if you don't become numb to it. I'm not trying to put my discomfort at seeing a homeless person above the discomfort of the homeless person who is homeless, but if you gave me the option to leave the city I live in and just ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. I'm not trying to put my discomfort at seeing a homeless person above the discomfort of the homeless person who is homeless, but if you gave me the option to leave the city I live in and just ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. You can relax in your semi-private pool. The poverty here is notorious and honestly it's very sad if you don't become numb to it. I'm not trying to put my discomfort at seeing a homeless person above the discomfort of the homeless person who is homeless, but if you gave me the option to leave the city I live in and just ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. I'm not trying to put my discomfort at seeing a homeless person above the discomfort of the homeless person who is homeless, but if you gave me the option to leave the city I live in and just ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. You can relax in your semi-private pool. The poverty here is notorious and honestly it's very sad if you don't become numb to it. I'm not trying to put my discomfort at seeing a homeless person above the discomfort of the homeless person who is homeless, but if you gave me the option to leave the city I live in and just ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. but if you gave me the option to leave the city where I live and simply ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. You can relax in your semi-private pool. The poverty here is notorious and honestly it's very sad if you don't become numb to it. I'm not trying to put my discomfort at seeing a homeless person above the discomfort of the homeless person who is homeless, but if you gave me the option to leave the city I live in and just ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. but if you gave me the option to leave the city where I live and simply ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. You can relax in your semi-private pool. The poverty here is notorious and honestly it's very sad if you don't become numb to it. I'm not trying to put my discomfort at seeing a homeless person above the discomfort of the homeless person who is homeless, but if you gave me the option to leave the city I live in and just ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. I'm not trying to put my discomfort at seeing a homeless person above the discomfort of the homeless person who is homeless, but if you gave me the option to leave the city I live in and just ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it. I'm not trying to put my discomfort at seeing a homeless person above the discomfort of the homeless person who is homeless, but if you gave me the option to leave the city I live in and just ... not participate in this cycle? Yes, I would probably take it.

I was talking to our attorney, Marcia, when the first cable arrived for $ 3 million. Then, about 30 minutes later, the second cable arrived for $ 3 million.

But to tell the truth, I was sweating until the money was in our bank account. We'd been through so much, and seen so many disappointments along the way, that I wasn't going to feel comfortable until the money was in our bank account.

Once the money was in our account, I felt safe.

That's the first dark secret of Silicon Valley startups: the round doesn't close until the money is in your account.

In fact, we raised $ 12 million, not $ 6 million. Receiving

Keep reading

I was talking to our attorney, Marcia, when the first cable arrived for $ 3 million. Then, about 30 minutes later, the second cable arrived for $ 3 million.

But to tell the truth, I was sweating until the money was in our bank account. We'd been through so much, and seen so many disappointments along the way, that I wasn't going to feel comfortable until the money was in our bank account.

Once the money was in our account, I felt safe.

That's the first dark secret of Silicon Valley startups: the round doesn't close until the money is in your account.

In fact, we raised $ 12 million, not $ 6 million. Receiving the other $ 6 million depended on us meeting specific milestones.

The milestones set by one of our investors were relatively straightforward to meet. All we had to do was "etch" four chips within 12 months of our operation (we completed milestones in 8 months).

However, that leads to the second dark secret of Silicon Valley startups: tranches are never a good thing for your startup.

There was language in the tranche that said something like "the money will be financed according to market conditions." In other words, what the investor was really saying was:

"We can decide, for whatever reason, to withhold the funds from you regardless of whether you fulfill your end of the bargain."

I'll tell you that he certainly started a fire under my ass. We were going to fulfill our end of the bargain as quickly as humanly possible because I didn't want anything worse to happen. If all else fails, return to dark secret number one: the round is not closed until the money is in your account.

That leads to the third dark secret of Silicon Valley startups: Your investors can drive you out regardless of how much property you have, as long as you need their money.

You think you're safe because your investors only own 20% of your company, you own 51%, and your employees and co-founders own the remaining 29%. You tell yourself that you cannot be eliminated.

And you are right, of course. But there's one thing you forgot: What happens when you need more money?

That is why you need to execute your plan well. And that is why you must act responsibly and positively. If you don't, investors can tell you that the terms of your next round of financing include your replacement. Ask Travis Kalanick if you don't believe me.

That leads to the dark secret room of Silicon Valley startups: Your next round of funding is no longer a given.

I remember telling our team after we closed our Serie A funding: “The worst is over. Round B will be much easier for us to close. "

The conventional wisdom used to be that getting your seed funding was the hardest round to close, and that your next round was a given. Sadly, that is no longer the case, and perhaps it never was. Check out this data from Crunchbase:

Your next round of funding is not a given. Remember that there is a limited amount of capital that investors have to spend. You are competing with other well-managed startups for that capital.

That leads to the fifth dark secret of Silicon Valley startups: The likelihood of a quick exit is pretty low.

In fact, you are likely to build your business longer than in the past. Plan that it will take seven to ten years, at least, to build your business. And that could be aggressive.

You need to make sure your team understands this too or you will have a disgruntled team.

That leads to the sixth dark secret of Silicon Valley startups: You're going to be working in the dark for a long, long time.

If you're in the startup game for fame and glory, think again. The reality is that no one is going to care about you and your little startup.

But before you think that's a horrible thing, it's actually a very good thing. Why? Being anonymous helps a lot because inattention means less competition.

And even if you are successful, nobody cares because you are just another successful entrepreneur.

That leads to the seventh and final dark secret of Silicon Valley startups: The team you start with isn't the team you'll probably end up with.

Here's a terrifying statistic for you to think about: Over 50% of relationships with founders end in failure. In my case, two of my four co-founders lasted less than two years.

The camaraderie and fun of the first few days will only last so long. So the reality is that building a startup is really a marathon, not a sprint.

Some members of your team will be fine with that, but some members of your team will move on. Even though our turnover was low, making the people you care about leave was always a hit to the body.

For more, read:

The Nine Fundraising Facts You Need To Know - Brett J. Fox Are You Raising Money For Your Startup? So you need to know these nine facts before raising your next round of funding.

Many good answers to this question.
The H1B Visa program is definitely a big deal for most US born and raised software developers. Over 65% of us have been replaced by H1B Visa workers, just because companies are getting away with it. yours and the laws are not being enforced enough.
But, before the H1B Visa program grew into what it is today, I remember traveling to Silicon Valley 20 years ago and there were numerous Indian and Chinese software engineers in Silicon Valley. They were smart, hardworking, and always got the job done. Now that the H1B visa program has grown too big,

Keep reading

Many good answers to this question.
The H1B Visa program is definitely a big deal for most US born and raised software developers. Over 65% of us have been replaced by H1B Visa workers, just because companies are getting away with it. yours and the laws are not being enforced enough.
But, before the H1B Visa program grew into what it is today, I remember traveling to Silicon Valley 20 years ago and there were numerous Indian and Chinese software engineers in Silicon Valley. They were smart, hardworking, and always got the job done. Now that the H1B visa program has gotten too big, we have problems with large Indian companies abandoning H1B visa workers in almost all large US corporations; many times replacing older American workers. The American worker, myself included, was forced to train these H1B workers, who were our replacements. Do you think we could train them to do everything we learned over many years? Absolutely not. The end result is poor work, incompetence (not from lack of effort) and lack of direction on the part of management, who fear for their own work. Most H1B workers work hard, but after a while, when they see the attitude of management in American companies, they start to worry less about work. Who does not, given the conditions in which they are forced to work. Indian recruitment companies exploit them, making things even worse. It is not your fault. It's the fault of corporate CEOs, who care about getting a huge advantage by cutting expenses and propping up stocks for their investors. They do not care about the American worker, who lost his job, more than they care that workers with H1B Visa are exploited. cutting costs and propping up stocks for its investors. They do not care about the American worker, who lost his job, more than they care that workers with H1B Visa are exploited. cutting costs and propping up stocks for its investors. They do not care about the American worker, who lost his job, more than they care that workers with H1B Visa are exploited.
This is what I call American greed; just like the tv show. Many of these CEOs should be jailed for violating our laws regarding H1B visas. The law should be applied and amended to force companies to pay H1B workers directly, more than $ 200 per hour, if they really need H1B workers. I guarantee that there will be no worker shortage and H1B Visa worker applications would be close to zero. The H1B Visa program only enriched large corporations and decimated the American economy. Most of us American software developers in our 60s are out of work, at a time when we should get the most out of it and spend more, helping our economy. Instead, We no longer go out to eat, we do not buy anything, we lose our houses or we do not remodel them, and we do not spend money on imports from China. We will keep our Hondas and Toyotas for 12 years, instead of 4. Our children live with us, or we live with them, so fewer people are buying bigger houses. Our economy is decimated by more than 40%; Yet the jaw-waving experts on CNN tell us that we have low unemployment and that we are booming. Yet nearly 50% of Americans cannot afford basic living expenses, such as housing and food. Most Americans over the age of 60 have little or no savings. We will keep our Hondas and Toyotas for 12 years, instead of 4. Our children live with us, or we live with them, so fewer people are buying bigger houses. Our economy is decimated by more than 40%; Yet the jaw-waving experts on CNN tell us that we have low unemployment and that we are booming. Yet nearly 50% of Americans cannot afford basic living expenses, such as housing and food. Most Americans over the age of 60 have little or no savings. We will keep our Hondas and Toyotas for 12 years, instead of 4. Our children live with us, or we live with them, so fewer people are buying bigger houses. Our economy is decimated by more than 40%; Yet the jaw-waving experts on CNN tell us that we have low unemployment and that we are booming. Yet nearly 50% of Americans cannot afford basic living expenses, such as housing and food. Most Americans over the age of 60 have little or no savings. They tell us that we have a low level of unemployment and that we are booming. Yet nearly 50% of Americans cannot afford basic living expenses, such as housing and food. Most Americans over the age of 60 have little or no savings. They tell us that we have a low level of unemployment and that we are booming. Yet nearly 50% of Americans cannot afford basic living expenses, such as housing and food. Most Americans over the age of 60 have little or no savings.
Our nation's debt is out of control, but we have little means to pay it off. We can end up in a total collapse, except if we have superinflation all over so that the debt seems less, which I hope will happen.
In short, Indians may be dominating now, because of H1B, but I think a lot of Indians were working in Silicon Valley before the H1B Visa glut started 5-7 years ago.

Hi, I'm Naresh Bojja. I am a digital marketer with 5 years of experience in this field.

If you ask someone what the tech capital of the world is, the first name you hear is silicon volley. Silicon Valley is home to major giant companies like Apple, Netflix, and uber. It still gives hope for startups and small businesses. The rise of Silicon Valley began in the 1970s with the semiconductor companies.

I want to mention a few startups that recently started in Silicon Valley.

  • Nuvia

NUVIA aims to achieve the next era of computing by reinventing silicon design to meet our demands.

Keep reading

Hi, I'm Naresh Bojja. I am a digital marketer with 5 years of experience in this field.

If you ask someone what the tech capital of the world is, the first name you hear is silicon volley. Silicon Valley is home to major giant companies like Apple, Netflix, and uber. It still gives hope for startups and small businesses. The rise of Silicon Valley began in the 1970s with the semiconductor companies.

I want to mention a few startups that recently started in Silicon Valley.

  • Nuvia

NUVIA aims to achieve the next era of computing by reinventing silicon design to meet the demands of users generating exponential amounts of data. The company's team has a laser focus on building processors that are energy efficient and can operate at levels that meet and exceed today's data demands.

  • To

Wing is a drone delivery platform and services company. You can order anything from online, coffee, tea, groceries, hardware tools, and pharmaceuticals. A drone will arrive at your door and make the delivery.

  • Productiv

Productive is an insight and analytical services company. This company manages its analysis and knowledge for the applications we use every day. Productive has tools that can compare your application with other applications and give us the reason where the problem is generated and how we can renew it.

  • He passed

Step is a mobile banking application that people can easily send money with applications.

  • Confluence

Confluera offers an autonomous detection and response platform that operates in real time to stop sophisticated cyberattacks. The platform automatically tracks malicious activity throughout the attack lifecycle to identify and stop attackers. Confluera continuously works during attacks to determine the proper context and avoid inconclusive correlations designed to divert the security protocol out of the way of hackers.

  • Dusty robotics

Dusty Robotics enables builders in the construction industry to access state-of-the-art robotic tools to make projects more efficient. Using building information modeling, Dusty Robotics deploys robots to make precise measurements of construction sites and terrain for construction teams to analyze. This leads to designs that are completed ten times faster than traditional methods and at a lower cost.

  • Hourly

Hourly enables finance and hiring managers to automate pay practices and save on workers' compensation costs from one convenient dashboard. The platform features powerful tools including automatic tax filing, mobile onboarding, time card syncing, and access to a trusted workers' compensation advisor, ensuring that businesses of all sizes can operate efficiently while keeping employees. employees at the top of their minds.

  • Bow

Arc created a platform where people can be interviewed for remote jobs. Arc eliminates the difficult process of hiring people and provides easy access to employers and employees.

You can receive all the alerts you have requested and interviews.

  • Emilio Health

Emilio's health focuses on medical services, he treats children who have behavior problems. This healthcare technology company creates clinics designed to allow specialists from multiple studies to support children, adolescents and adults, while Emilio Health's digital platform provides a streamlined process for scheduling, progress tracking and online. Therefore, it has both online and offline operations in Silicon Valley.

I think I answered the question in detail if you find it informative, please vote in favor.

Thanks.

You shouldn't work at a startup if you think the work you're doing today is worth a market compensation salary. If you want to bet your paycheck every month, put it in red and spin the wheel. The odds are so much better.

You shouldn't work at a startup if you want a steady job. Most startups last around a year. Some startups that last more than a year have to switch to a new business model and need radically different types of staff for the new model. So you leave.

Don't work at a startup if you're a bit cynical about the founder's open talk about changing the world and

Keep reading

You shouldn't work at a startup if you think the work you're doing today is worth a market compensation salary. If you want to bet your paycheck every month, put it in red and spin the wheel. The odds are so much better.

You shouldn't work at a startup if you want a steady job. Most startups last around a year. Some startups that last more than a year have to switch to a new business model and need radically different types of staff for the new model. So you leave.

Don't work at a startup if you're a bit cynical about the founder's open talk about changing the world and getting rich in the process. If you want to drink the kool-aid, there are many sects that are looking for new members.

Forget about startups if you want to learn your trade. Startups hire young people because they are idealistic and gullible. Work at a great company now to get good experience and guidance. Develop a niche skill. Then compare your resume. You will get better stock options.

When you're older and more experienced, know more about the industry, and have enough money saved to safely risk a few months of pay, then look for startups. The best ones will think you're cool. Most likely, the rest will not like you, because you are harder to fool than bright young faces just out of school. This is how you know you were right.

It's about the density of people working on problems in the technology field. There are. Many. technology people. here. It's actually quite surprising how much it feels like a one-industry city.

(Obviously, it's not really a one-industry city ... but it is a city dominated by a particular industry. Like Washington DC, it is dominated by the public sector, although most people do other things.)

Some examples of how this can be "advantageous":

  • Most of the people I know work socially in the tech field. Many of them are potential clients or employees of compan
Keep reading

It's about the density of people working on problems in the technology field. There are. Many. technology people. here. It's actually quite surprising how much it feels like a one-industry city.

(Obviously, it's not really a one-industry city ... but it is a city dominated by a particular industry. Like Washington DC, it is dominated by the public sector, although most people do other things.)

Some examples of how this can be "advantageous":

  • Most of the people I know work socially in the tech field. Many of them are potential clients or employees of companies I work with.
  • If I read about a company or founder who is doing something interesting in technology, there is a 50/50 chance that they are less than 40 miles from where I am sitting right now. I can hunt people very easily.
  • Similarly, people can find it very easily (if you want them to find it).
  • Salespeople and business development professionals can walk to Starbucks to host an in-person business meeting or discuss a deal.
  • Two very influential sources of cheap, young and smart labor (Cal and Stanford) are here, with dozens of other universities in the area producing talent that is almost as good.
  • Due to networks like LinkedIn that overlap on the social fabric of the area, I can see common connections between myself and just about anyone I'd like to meet. Usually those common connections also live in the area. It just makes things easier than if you had to perform the same task but from a distance.


The community here is self-perpetuating. Because there is such a density of people in our industry here, more people are coming. Because more people come, more people stay. In general, a lot is happening.

This is not to say that these benefits are "exclusive" or permanent. Perhaps another part of the United States is the "Silicon Valley of 2050." But right now, the concentration of tech minds here is quite unique.

Also, the weather is nice.

The real Silicon Valley is even more absurd in many ways. Here are some examples I can think of. This may contain some spoilers.

1. Peter Gregory's marine rig at the end of season 1 is basically http://seasteading.org

2. The opening sequence for season 2 shows Yahoo's big purple bus and a group of protesters. My co-workers were on the purple bus that a protester threw up on: http: //recode.net/2014/04/02/splashy-tactics-tech-shuttle-protestor-vomits-on-yahoo-bus/. They called and said they were missing a meeting because a guy got on and stuck a finger down his throat and def

Keep reading

The real Silicon Valley is even more absurd in many ways. Here are some examples I can think of. This may contain some spoilers.

1. Peter Gregory's marine rig at the end of season 1 is basically http://seasteading.org

2. The opening sequence for season 2 shows Yahoo's big purple bus and a group of protesters. My co-workers were on the purple bus that a protester threw up on: http: //recode.net/2014/04/02/splashy-tactics-tech-shuttle-protestor-vomits-on-yahoo-bus/. They called and said they were missing a meeting because a guy got on, stuck a finger down his throat and desecrated the bus. We thought it was ridiculous, but funny in hindsight.

3. Season 1 opening where children's rock screams at scattered applause and people who don't care. That happened at Yahoo with a band. There was scattered applause and the band began to mock the audience because people were more interested in the ice cream stand.

4. Rest and dress - very real. It takes a while for the acquirer to shoot the breaks and tables, so some people spend a lot of time in the gym or foosball tables.

5. Richard's friend saying his startup is doing great and then asking for a job because his startup is dying is also very realistic. Every startup founder has to say that his startup is doing very well until the end. Employees are usually the last to know. I've seen really sudden business closures. This isn't that much fun in real life and it's actually super terrible for the founding team, but it happens and then the glorious press releases are fun to read in hindsight.

A footnote: Aviato - don't mix this with Aviate because the Aviate guys are really good and none of them are like Erlich.

Anyway, I think the show captures the vibe of this place pretty well. The gender imbalance is pretty correct, but the show could have a bit more Asian engineers to be more realistic.

In addition to the good feedback on seniors when it comes to investing and advising, it's also worth remembering that a generation ago Silicon Valley was all about silicon; Google, Facebook, and Yahoo didn't exist, and the interesting places to work back then were semiconductor companies. With training, experience, and skills in the hardware and semiconductor industry, many of the brilliant people who graduated a generation ago are still in Silicon Valley working or leading some of the world's largest technology companies.

Today, Silicon Valley could be associated with software and the beginning of the Internet.

Keep reading

In addition to the good feedback on seniors when it comes to investing and advising, it's also worth remembering that a generation ago Silicon Valley was all about silicon; Google, Facebook, and Yahoo didn't exist, and the interesting places to work back then were semiconductor companies. With training, experience, and skills in the hardware and semiconductor industry, many of the brilliant people who graduated a generation ago are still in Silicon Valley working or leading some of the world's largest technology companies.

Today, Silicon Valley could be associated with the software and internet startups of 20-somethings in Palo Alto and Mountain View; But you don't have to look further east than Sunnyvale, Santa Clara, and San Jose to see the stalwarts - and most employers - of Silicon Valley: companies like Intel, Cisco, Sun, AMD, LSI, National Semiconductors, IBM, and much others. Many people have built their careers at companies like these, along with Oracle and Hewlett-Packard, and are happy to remain in excellent engineering and leadership positions at the end of their careers at companies that have shaped the technology industry such as we know it.

The job scene in Silicon Valley has less relevance to your own job search. Ultimately, it's all about the supply and demand for the particular skill set you possess. While Silicon Valley can be a great place to work for an engineer, at the same time it can be a difficult place for other specialties.

If you are having trouble getting interviews, try the following:

1. Apply to smaller / less popular companies. Everyone and their aunt want to work on Google / Facebook / Twitter etc, but there are many other companies in the area that still need to hire.

2. Consider applying for entry-level jobs at

Keep reading

The job scene in Silicon Valley has less relevance to your own job search. Ultimately, it's all about the supply and demand for the particular skill set you possess. While Silicon Valley can be a great place to work for an engineer, at the same time it can be a difficult place for other specialties.

If you are having trouble getting interviews, try the following:

1. Apply to smaller / less popular companies. Everyone and their aunt want to work on Google / Facebook / Twitter etc, but there are many other companies in the area that still need to hire.

2. Consider applying for entry-level jobs in areas that are similar to the area in which you want a job. We all want jobs that use our experience and pay a great salary. But the second option of a job in which we need to learn new things and consequently accept a short-term pay cut is not so bad (compared to no job).

3. Make sure your resume is professional, honest, and contains no spelling errors, etc. (I know this is really basic, but nothing is worse than someone applying for a job with a poorly formatted, misspelled resume.)

Good luck.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.