What are the biggest differences between working for Apple now and when Steve Jobs was CEO?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Memphis Workman



What are the biggest differences between working for Apple now and when Steve Jobs was CEO?

Steve Jobs created the company and has made it a success not once, but twice. He was a visionary while Tim Cook is a much more sophisticated and practical person, both of which have their own advantages.
When Jobs was in command, he controlled everything, literally. Jobs himself approved the designs (after rejecting dozens of them), he meddled with the team that made the interface and software and demanded to make them as simple as possible, he handled the ads and HR himself as well; he basically made the most of his 24 hours, in which he made people's lives miserable. Everyone who worked with Steve Jobs f

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Steve Jobs created the company and has made it a success not once, but twice. He was a visionary while Tim Cook is a much more sophisticated and practical person, both of which have their own advantages.
When Jobs was in charge, he controlled everything, literally. Jobs himself approved the designs (after rejecting dozens of them), he meddled with the team that made the interface and software and demanded to make them as simple as possible, he handled the ads and HR himself as well; he basically made the most of his 24 hours, in which he made people's lives miserable. Everyone who worked with Steve Jobs found him to be annoying, controlling, and abusive while working with him; but after a while the same people realized his genius. Steve Jobs had a binary thought: either something was brilliant and outstanding, or it was total crap; either a person was brilliant and cool, or a complete idiot. In this way, he severely criticized most people and their creations, and worshiped the ones he liked.

Tim Cook is a complete south pole north of Steve Jobs. He is calm, collected and never lets his feelings get the better of him. As a mature company, Apple needed a CEO like Cook, but it couldn't have done what Jobs did.

So Jobs and Cook are good at their own positions; But Steve Jobs was a visionary and soulful dreamer who believed he could, and he changed the world; and I'm sure Tim Cook would agree with this.

Disclaimer: I have not worked or worked for Apple, nor do I have any actual "inside" information.

An engineer working on Mac OSX Mountain Lion told me that under Tim Cook Apple has become more organized. He told me that Apple was very chaotic with Jobs while working on Lion and that the rush of the project led to a sub-par operating system (Tiger and Snow Leopard were much more stable). Apparently Apple's better organization gave engineers more time to actually work on Mountain Lion, which is why it's more streamlined than its predecessor.

With the change of roles and the removal of Apple executives, there seems to be more

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Disclaimer: I have not worked or worked for Apple, nor do I have any actual "inside" information.

An engineer working on Mac OSX Mountain Lion told me that under Tim Cook Apple has become more organized. He told me that Apple was very chaotic with Jobs while working on Lion and that the rush of the project led to a sub-par operating system (Tiger and Snow Leopard were much more stable). Apparently Apple's better organization gave engineers more time to actually work on Mountain Lion, which is why it's more streamlined than its predecessor.

With the reorganization of roles and the removal of Apple executives, it seems to be more organized and united. People who work at Apple seem to appreciate the changes.

Stock options should be worth much less ...

Given that someone pointed out that this needed improvement and apparently wants this explained, Apple is not performing as well as it had in equities. The stock price is falling month by month. So the options (such as stock options) that employees got are now worth less, in some cases far less than they were when Steve Jobs was CEO and introduced radically new products every year or two.

At the risk of seeming obvious, your CEO is not Steve Jobs! That fact in itself is challenging. Many came to the company due to its gravitational pull.

I don't know about how the organization works, but as a company, Apple's luster has faded as its dynamic sales and earnings growth and powerful stock rally have reversed.

Apple has nothing magical since Steve Jobs left, I watched Steve Jobs' first-generation iPad keynote and I feel like I want a first-generation iPad even as I have a third-generation iPad. The point is that the magic of Apple is gone with Steve Jobs

Tim Cook is now the CEO.

I assume you mean the period right after Steve Jobs became interim CEO in July 1997, after Gil Amelio overthrew http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E04E3D61339F933A25754C0A961958260
Steve Jobs was CEO of Pixar at the time, and "special advisor to the CEO of Apple" since December 1996. He only "officially" became CEO of Apple in January 2000.

The best stories I have read about this period (1997-98) are in Alan Deutschman's excellent biography, The Second Coming of Steve Jobs (2001). You may also want to check out this pretty good 1998 Newsweek article on all S decisions.

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I assume you mean the period right after Steve Jobs became interim CEO in July 1997, after Gil Amelio overthrew http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E04E3D61339F933A25754C0A961958260
Steve Jobs was CEO of Pixar at the time, and "special advisor to the CEO of Apple" since December 1996. He only "officially" became CEO of Apple in January 2000.

The best stories I have read about this period (1997-98) are in Alan Deutschman's excellent biography, The Second Coming of Steve Jobs (2001). You can also check out this pretty cool Newsweek article from 1998 on all the decisions Steve made when he got back: http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/1998/11/09/250834/index. htm

When Steve returned, he took several weeks to meet with everyone at the company and review all the departments and ongoing projects. He absorbed all this information and worked like crazy. Then came the drastic decisions:

  • installed many NeXT veterans in key positions (Phil Schiller for marketing, Jon Rubistein for hardware, Avie Tevanian and Bertrand Serlet for software, Nancy Heinen for legal ... just to name a few) and got rid of previous Apple managers
  • cut several projects, reducing them from 50 to less than a dozen. It was not easy. The story goes that basically all project managers and their teams had to defend their project to Steve, explain why it was critical to the future of the company. If he was not convinced, the project was immediately canceled and several people fired.
  • it changed the company's strategy across various domains, including distribution, licensing (it killed the clones), and of course marketing (Think Different campaign). Watch this internal video to get an idea of ​​how it was perceived within Apple: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jvwf-VOW8dg
  • he installed the culture of secrecy he had created in NeXT. He shot leakers and hung a sign in his WWII office, "Loose lips can sink ships." This culture has been maintained at Apple ever since, in my opinion it is one of its greatest strengths.


It is said (and understandably) that the atmosphere at Apple was tense at the time. The story of people who are afraid to get on the elevator with Steve Jobs because they might lose their job before leaving is from that period. Steve's presence could be felt everywhere on campus, he even banned pets and smoking, and hired Palo Alto caterer Il Fornaio to run the cafeteria ...

But overall, employees were also delighted that there was finally someone running the company with a clear vision at the top. As Mike Moritz said in a Bloomberg documentary, the Think Different campaign was not only aimed at consumers but also at Apple employees internally. It was Steve telling them: "Think differently from the competition, be Apple again."

The result came with the original iMac, introduced in May 1998, and the rest is history. Needless to say, being ruthless paid off.

Your question is quite broad. What did Steve do for Apple at what point?

You could venture back to the early days of the company when Woz and Jobs were going to HomeBrew and sharing what Woz had created, and Steve was thinking about how to put $ in their pockets.

You could move on to when Apple was on the ground ready to plunge into the abyss and Jobs, while at Pixar, was driven to think about resurrecting the company to greatness.

You could accelerate into the future and look at the iPod, iPhone, iPad and understand that Jobs was welcoming the world to the new way of working with technology in

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Your question is quite broad. What did Steve do for Apple at what point?

You could venture back to the early days of the company when Woz and Jobs were going to HomeBrew and sharing what Woz had created, and Steve was thinking about how to put $ in their pockets.

You could move on to when Apple was on the ground ready to plunge into the abyss and Jobs, while at Pixar, was driven to think about resurrecting the company to greatness.

You could speed into the future and look at the iPod, iPhone, iPad and understand that Jobs was welcoming the world to the new way of working with technology in a broad touch and swipe sense.

Steve Jobs envisioned a company that would do more than just create computers for the masses. He had an idea for a company that would create technology for the world that would allow users to quickly and easily complete tasks.

Jobs also had the ability to see greatness within themselves and inspire them to dig deeper and bring out their brilliance. There are times when he did it easily, and there were times when he drove people crazy with his approach, which could be perceived as INTENSE.

Jobs also had a great sense of understanding of design and how to easily improve things in simple but elegant ways by making changes or modifications to an existing design to make it work better.

Steve Jobs - Visionary, Marketer, Spokesperson, DemoGenius, Inspirational, and more.

Yes, Steve Jobs was an integral part of Apple and its success. Could Apple have existed without Steve Jobs? Yes. It existed. When he was alive, he shot up due to his energy and the emotion that surrounded him. Now, it is practically existing and still up to scratch, as true company innovation has not existed since October 5, 2011. Sadly.

Of course, this is all my perception of the person and friend known as Steve Jobs that I knew for 24 years.

Peace

Steve Jobs focused on innovation. Tim Cook focused on selling more iPhones. There is a big difference in ideology here. Steve Jobs would create what he wanted to create and believe in changing the world with his products, while Tim Cook is only reaping the benefits of Jobs' heritage. Today, Apple still connects iPhones and MacBooks with Jobs memory instead of Cook. Steve Jobs created products that were not on the market and were ahead of their time, while Tim Cook is simply m ...

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Obviously, I am not writing from personal experience.

This is a compilation of some posts that I have read over and over again to gain more in-depth information about Jobs' thought process. So far I haven't had much luck. But here are the points anyway.

Bob Borchers, one of Apple's product managers who worked on the first iPhone, said Jobs presented the team with a simple mission: to create the first phone that people would love so much they would never leave home without it.

He didn't mention anything about the type of apps and media that would run on the phone. Downloadable apps, advanced GPS capabilities, photos and videos

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Obviously, I am not writing from personal experience.

This is a compilation of some posts that I have read over and over again to gain more in-depth information about Jobs' thought process. So far I haven't had much luck. But here are the points anyway.

Bob Borchers, one of Apple's product managers who worked on the first iPhone, said Jobs presented the team with a simple mission: to create the first phone that people would love so much they would never leave home without it.

He didn't mention anything about the type of apps and media that would run on the phone. Downloadable applications, advanced GPS capabilities, photo and video capabilities, and voice integration were not part of the original mandate. They evolved as the team worked on the phone. And Jobs exercised his attention to detail and penchant for perfection every step of the way.

When Apple began discussing a partnership with AT&T, its first official wireless carrier, AT&T wanted to follow the standard practice of buying all Apple phones directly and then selling them to customers on its own.

Apple's product managers said no. They wanted to sell the iPhone and be able to speak directly to customers. Steve made it possible. That was a revolution in the industry. 1


Former Apple designer Mark Kawano shared that a common tip for designers was to take the stairs because if Jobs found them in an elevator, he would ask them what they were doing. So, one of two things would happen:

  1. I would hate it and they could be fired.
  2. He would love it, the details would catch his eye and the designer would lose every night, weekend and vacation on the project.

People who thrived at Apple welcomed that passion and loved the opportunity to work with Jobs. They were willing to give up their nights and weekends for the opportunity to learn from Jobs.

As for Kawano personally, he ran into Jobs once at the coffee shop and tried to get him to get in front of him in line, but Jobs didn't want to. "He was super demanding ... but when it came to other things, he wanted to be very democratic and be treated like everyone else." 2


In his response, Brett Bilbrey shared his experience:

We had to replace the external iSight camera which was a CCD imager, with an internal CMOS imager ... When it came time for Steve to compare the quality of our prototype to the existing external iSight Steve started asking me technical questions very detailed and specific. . I had the answers, but he kept digging deeper and deeper ... This was not the kind of question expected of a CEO of a large company. And Steve had his hand in EVERYTHING at Apple, from marketing to engineering.

I answered your question about the difference between the light gathering characteristics of the two technologies, and then realized that I had reached the limit of my knowledge. Had I pushed harder I probably wouldn't have had an answer for him ... I think he did very well dealing with technology, and I miss his 'teachable moments'. 3


The late Apple board member Bill Campbell also had a story to share. In the early 2000s, Jobs was splitting his time between Apple and Pixar. Since most of his days were spent at Apple, he had to figure out where his attention was needed very quickly.

So I was running sessions with all the different teams (the Cars team, the tech team, etc.) and there were dozens of people in each one. Then he would point to one person in each session and say: Tell me what is wrong with Pixar.

That person might say, "The design team is not open to the new technology we are building." Jobs would ask others if they agreed. Then I'd pick someone else and say: Tell me what works at Pixar.

Jobs would alternate between the two questions until he felt like he had an idea of ​​what was going on. 4


So I guess whether people enjoyed working with Jobs at Apple depends on what enjoyment means to them. If they appreciated the learning and attention to detail, they took the opportunity to learn from it with both hands.

If they didn't, he was a tyrant the world only came to know after reading Walter Isaacson's biography of him.

I would have loved to work with Steve and learn from him. But most likely he thinks I'm a jerk and not only fired me, but also the manager who hired me.

Thank you for reading. If I have made mistakes in the judgments, please leave a comment.

1 Former Apple Product Manager Relates How Jobs Motivated the First iPhone Team
2 4 Myths About Apple's Design, From a Former Apple Designer
3 Brett Bilbrey's Answer to How Steve Thrived Jobs in a technical field with a background?
4 Steve Jobs's secret to generating questions, heard in a cafe in San Francisco

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